Oh, Suddenly MSNBC Is Concerned With Executive Overreach?

Suddenly, the journalists at MSNBC are concerned with executive overreach. Liberal reporters didn’t care much during the Obama years, but now that Donald Trump has declared a national emergency, MSNBC is concerned.

Reporting on news that Democrats will try and stop it, correspondent Garrett Haake goaded, “How many Republicans come out and get on this resolution? After as much Republicans have talked about executive overreach in the Obama presidency, how will they react now? When this thing moves over to the Senate, that's the same question we're seeing one more time there.” 

 

 

Where were MSNBC journalists during Obama’s questionable executive moves? 

Haake continued, “There have been about half a dozen, maybe ten Republican senators who have spoken out about the President's action here on this national emergency. Will they put their votes where their mouths on and vote with Democrats to say they don't think it's appropriate?” 

Talking to a former Democratic Congresswoman, MSNBC Live co-host Craig Melvin suddenly discovered “too much authority” in a President could be a problem: 

I want to bring into the conversation former congresswoman Donna Edwards. She just wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post that's quite timely. The headlines, it's time for Congress to take back its power. It's worth noting, I think, that this is not an entirely new phenomenon. You could make the argument that Congress ceded far too much authority a long time ago to the executive branch. 

Convenient the timing of when these philosophical revelations happen for journalists? 

MSNBC Live
2/22/19
11:21

CRAIG MELVIN: Breaking news on this Friday. House Democrats just introduced a plan to terminate President Trump's emergency declaration along the southern border before it ever takes effect or reaches a courtroom. It is the latest challenge that pits Democrats in the house against the president of the United States in the battle for power. Who holds that power, who checks that power, who has the backing of the majority of the American people? MSNBC's Garrett Haake live for us on Capitol Hill right now. He is following this breaking story. It’s all moving pretty fast. Bring us up to speed on where we are right now, sir. 

GARRETT HAAKE: Craig, House Democrats are going to move fast here. They introduced this legislation or this resolution, I should say, this morning. They're going to work it through the rules committee. On Monday, they're going to bring it to the floor on Tuesday. They want to get this thing passed through the House and over to the Senate side as quickly as possible. Now, we know this will pass the House. It's already been introduced with enough cosponsors that if not a single other person signs on, it will pass the House. Right now, it only has one Republican signed on. That will be a big thing to watch on Tuesday. How many Republicans come out and get on this resolution, After as much Republicans have talked about executive overreach in the Obama presidency, how will they react now? When this thing moves over to the Senate, that's the same question we're seeing one more time there. 

There have been about half a dozen, maybe ten Republican senators who have spoken out about the President's action here on this national emergency. Will they put their votes where their mouths on and vote with Democrats to say they don't think it's appropriate? Now if this passes both houses, it goes to the President's desk where he will veto it. Can this garner enough support to override a presidential veto? That will be really tough. And I think we'll know the answer to that on Tuesday. Can Democrats in the House where they have the majority bring enough Republicans over that they could maybe threaten a veto proof majority? If they can't do it in the House, they won't be able to do it in the Senate. But even if this thing just passes both houses and goes to the president, it would require President Trump to use his veto pen for the very first time, a major fracture in the Republican Party and would send a pretty strong message to the country about where everyone stands on this wall emergency measure. 
...

MELVIN: I want to bring into the conversation former congresswoman Donna Edwards. She just wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post that's quite timely. The headlines, it's time for Congress to take back its power. It's worth noting, I think, that this is not an entirely new phenomenon. You could make the argument that Congress ceded far too much authority a long time ago to the executive branch. 

 

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