CNN/Al Gore Propaganda: Climate a Matter of ‘Right and Wrong’ Like Civil Rights

The highlight of CNN’s primetime lineup Tuesday was  The Climate Crisis town hall where they teamed up with former Vice President and climate alarmist Al Gore to push his propaganda. “Consensus in the scientific community is clear. Sea levels are rising. The oceans are warming,” moderator Anderson Cooper declared as he started the program. The event became even more ridiculous when Gore equated getting people to believe him was like the Civil Rights movement, in that “it's just really a question of right and wrong.”

Gore’s shameful self-aggrandizing came after Cooper teed him up to push for more U.S. resources to be diverted to solar energy. “You know, you talk about solar, why does the U.S. only get about 1 percent of its electricity right now from solar,” he asked. Progress was slow, according to gore, but a tipping point was to happen very soon.

The former Vice President then smeared those skeptical of his radical and wrong predictions by equating them to racists that opposed the Civil Rights movement. “When I was a boy growing up a lot of the time in the south, I remember when the Civil Rights movement was gaining momentum,” he recalled. “I'll tell you the resistance to Civil Rights laws was just as fierce if not more so than the resistance to solving is the climate crisis.”

“Ultimately, we crossed a political tipping point and people realized oh, it's just really a question of right and wrong,” Gore added without a peep from Cooper.

Out of the nine average Americans who were selected to pose questions to Gore, only two of them offered any kind of push back to his claims. One questioned the morality of actively seeking to put coal miners out of work, while the other dried up Gore’s assertion of rising sea levels.

James Eskridge was the mayor of Tangier Island, an island that has been in the process of being reclaimed by the ocean. But Mayor Eskridge knows it’s not the rising water levels behind it:

I've been working the Chesapeake Bay for 50-plus years and I have a crab-house business out on the water. And the water level is the same as it was when the place was built in 1970. I'm not a scientist, but I'm a keen observer and if sea level rise is occurring, why am I not seeing signs of it?

Being the highfalutin elitist that he was, Gore scoffed at the Mayor’s statement, asking: “What do you think the erosion is due to, Mayor?” Eskridge explained that wave action and storms were responsible for the erosion that “has been going on since Captain John Smith discovered the island and named it.”

“And if I see sea level rise occurring, I'll shout it from the housetop,” Eskridge joked. “I mean, we don't have the land to give up, but I'm just not seeing it.”

Clearly fed up with the conversation, Gore seemed to lament about having to dumb down what he was saying to convince simple people:

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Well, arguments about science aren't necessarily going to be of any comfort to you.

Yeah. Okay. Well, one of the challenges of this issue is taking what the -- what the scientists say and translating it into terms that are believable to people where they can see the consequences in their own lives. And I get that and I try every day to figure out ways to do that.

There was no mention by Cooper of Gore’s hypocrisy of living an extravagant life style where he got to prance around the globe on a polluting private jet while living in a home with a $30,000 utility bill. But Cooper did allow him to twist a claim he once made to suit recent events.

“Probably the single-most criticized scene in that movie was an animated sequence showing that sea level rise plus the storm surge would bring ocean water into the 9/11 Memorial site where the Twin Towers were and people said that's ridiculous,” he said as he noted how “Super-storm” Sandy did just that.

But Gore’s prediction was not that a storm would flood the site, but that rising sea levels would reclaim the site and permanently reshape the coast line of Manhattan, and much of the United States, by 2014. And since we’re talking about Gore’s wrong predictions, let’s talk about what he had said about hurricanes.

According to Gore’s movie, Americans should be afraid because nearly every future hurricane was going to be another Katrina and was going to reach category four and five in strength nearly every time. But according to NOAA’s own data, since 2010 the U.S. had only been hit by six hurricanes with the strongest one being a category two. In fact, the last time the U.S. experienced a stronger hurricane was back in 2005 when Hurricane Wilma made landfall.

Of course, there was no mention of any of that since CNN was more than happy to aid Gore in his endeavor to push climate change propaganda and alarmism.

Transcript below:

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CNN
The Climate Change Crisis
August 1, 2017
9:00:35 PM Eastern

ANDERSON COOPER: We're here for a special CNN town hall on the climate crisis with former Vice President Al Gore. I'm Anderson cooper. I want to welcome our viewers watching in the United States and watching around the world. Consensus in the scientific community is clear. Sea levels are rising. The oceans are warming. But there's not a consensus, at least among politicians here, what to do about it. Now, 11 years after the release of a film "An Inconvenient Truth,” Vice President Al Gore is out with a new film, "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power."

9:23:48 PM Eastern

MAYOR JAMES ESKRIDGE: Vice President Gore, Mr. Cooper, I'm a commercial crabber and I've been working the Chesapeake Bay for 50-plus years and I have a crab-house business out on the water. And the water level is the same as it was when the place was built in 1970. I'm not a scientist, but I'm a keen observer and if sea level rise is occurring, why am I not seeing signs of it? I mean, our island is disappearing, but it's because of erosion and not sea level rise, and unless we get a sea-wall, we will lose our island, but back to the question, why am I not seeing signs of the sea level rise?

AL GORE: What do you think the erosion is due to, Mayor?

ESKRIDGE: Wave action. Storms.

GORE: Has that increased any?

ESKRIDGE: Not really. I mean –

GORE: So you're losing the island even though the waves haven't increased?

ESKRIDGE: Yes. This erosion has been going on since Captain John Smith discovered the island and named it.

GORE: Well –

ESKRIDGE: It's got to our doorstep now and we focus on it more.

GORE: Well, arguments about science aren't necessarily going to be of any comfort to you and I'm sorry for what you're going through and your neighbors on Tangier Island. I read about you in the paper. There was an article in The Washington Post I believe after President Trump called you up. Won't necessarily do you any good for me to tell you the scientists do say that the sea level is rising in the Chesapeake Bay and you’ve lost about two-thirds of your island already over a longer period of time and the forecast for the future is another two feet of -- what would another -- if there was another two feet of sea level rise, what would that mean for Tangier Island?

ESKRIDGE: Tangier island, our elevation is only about four foot above sea level.

GORE: Yeah.

ESKRIDGE: And if I see sea level rise occurring, I'll shout it from the housetop.

GORE: Okay.

ESKRIDGE: I mean, we don't have the land to give up, but I'm just not seeing it.

GORE: Yeah. Okay. Well, one of the challenges of this issue is taking what the -- what the scientists say and translating it into terms that are believable to people where they can see the consequences in their own lives. And I get that and I try every day to figure out ways to do that.

9:31 14 PM Eastern

GORE: And the predictions of the climate scientists in the past have, unfortunately, come true. When the first movie came out, you referred to it, one of the-- probably the single-most criticized scene in that movie was an animated sequence showing that sea level rise plus the storm surge would bring ocean water into the 9/11 Memorial site where the Twin Towers were and people said that's ridiculous. But when super-storm Sandy hit, sure enough, years before it was predicted to occur, the ocean water flooded into that site.

9:49:31 PM Eastern

COOPER: You know, you talk about solar, why does the U.S. only get about 1 percent of its electricity right now from solar? I mean, if it's so great?

GORE: Well, it's increasing rapidly, and the big change in the cost reduction has come just in the last few years, and where technology particularly is concerned, also politics sometimes, there was a great economist who died a few years ago, Rudy Dornbush, and he said this. He said, "Things take longer to happen than you think they will, but then they happen much faster than you thought they could."

And we've seen that with all these technological advances like the smartphones and so forth. We've seen it in politics also. When I was a boy growing up a lot of the time in the south, I remember when the Civil Rights movement was gaining momentum. I'll tell you the resistance to Civil Rights laws was just as fierce if not more so than the resistance to solving is the climate crisis. Ultimately, we crossed a political tipping point and people realized oh, it's just really a question of right and wrong. Take the gay rights revolution.

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