Maria Hinojosa: Public Media 'Bends Over Backward' Not to Appear 'Too Progressive'

Turns out that what we see and hear on NPR, PBS, etc. is an intentionally toned-down version of just how liberal they really are. Makes you wonder what they'd be like if they let their true progressive flags fly: a live feed of Cuban government TV, with occasional features from Venezuelan Public Broadcasting?

On MSNBC's AM Joy today, Maria Hinojosa said:

"The government supports the Corporation for Public Broadcasting that supports public media, which is independent. Although oftentimes kind of bends over backward to show that they're not too progressive, precisely because they don't want to be caught on that charge."

Anyone regularly subjected to public media knows that it leans—way—left. As an example, our Tim Graham recently caught a PBS Newshour segment in which the two talking heads agreed that the incoming Dem House class—which includes the likes of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez—is actually made up of "moderates," and is indeed "pretty conservative." As Graham noted:

"So ends a typical PBS NewsHour 'debate,' where no one is invited to say anything contradictory about Nancy Pelosi being ultraliberal or anything about Democrats tilting too far to the left."

Of course, by saying that public media bends over backward so as not to "be caught," Hinojosa in effect admits the obvious: that the public media, supported with taxpayer dollars, is a left-wing operation. And so it tries—and fails—to deceive the public about its political identity.

Hinojosa also claimed: "I don't work for NPR. I don't work for PBS. I represent myself here."

Odd, considering that NPR describes Hinojosa this way:

"The anchor and executive producer of the long-running weekly NPR show Latino USA . . . anchor of the Emmy Award-winning talk show Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One from WGBH [a PBS member TV station] . . . Previously, a Senior Correspondent for NOW on PBS, and currently, a rotating anchor for Need to Know [a PBS show.]" 

Maybe Hinojosa is now some sort of independent contractor with PBS. But—directly or indirectly—she is getting her share of public funding. For her to claim that public media bends over backward to be fair would be hilarious—were it not so outrageously untrue.

 

Media Bias Debate PBS News Hour MSNBC AM Joy Radio NPR Maria Hinojosa

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