Colbert: Handmaid's Tale 'Part Of The Vocabulary Of Resistance'

In 2016, the pink hat seen around the world was used by feminists as a symbol of “resistance” to protest the inauguration of the duly elected President Trump. Now, the latest virtue-signaling garb of the feminist movement is a red robe and white hat derived from the popular show, The Handmaid’s Tale. It is difficult to miss the slew of pro-abortion activists donning the trendy ensemble outside of the Supreme Court and state legislatures around the country. Members of the media elite zealously jump at the opportunity to give airtime to the outfit, including late night host Stephen Colbert.

On The Late Show Saturday night, Colbert was salivating while discussing the rise in women taking to the streets in the costume. “The red cloak and the white bonnet has become a symbol -- I've got a photograph here -- it's become part of the vocabulary of resistance to some of the sort of backward-looking changes happening, especially women's rights.”

 


The “backward-looking changes” Colbert was referring to include the “heartbeat bills” being passed by numerous states to protect the sanctity of life.

In a statement that seemed to go over the heads of the audience members as well as Colbert himself, Moss lauded: “I think it's pretty unusual that there's an image of something that just immediately communicates, you know, what side that person's on and what they stand for.” Is Elizabeth Moss aware of what a Make America Great Again hat is?

To Colbert, the advancement of rights for women still in the womb, is setting back women's progress in society.

Click expand to read the full transcript below:

The Late Show with Steven Colbert

06/07/19

12:00 a.m. Eastern

STEVEN COLBERT: You started "Handmaid's Tale" in 2016 before the election. Now, now not only in some ways did it seem prescient, but the red cloak and the white bonnet has become a symbol-- I've got a photograph here-- it's become part of the vocabulary of resistance to some of the sort of backward-looking changes happening, especially women's rights. Does that feel, as a star and as a producer of this show, does it feel surreal to you to see that actually out in the world being-- being used seriously?

ELIZABETH MOSS: It does. It does feel-- it feels surreal. It's my work outfit. It's like your suit. It's what I wear when I go to work. When I see it used in what I think is a very beautiful way and a very important way, I'm proud. And I'm proud to put it on myself, you know. I think it's pretty unusual that there's an image of something that just immediately communicates, you know, what side that person's on and what they stand for. And I'm-- I'm proud of those women.

NBDaily Feminism Late Show Celebrities Steven Colbert
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