California Ban on the Word ‘Alien’ Hailed on Univision

California is hitting one home run after another on behalf of its teeming population of unauthorized immigrants. Or at least that’s the way it’s seen on the nation’s top Spanish-language television network, Univision.

Univision anchor Jorge Ramos hailed the Golden State’s latest move - eliminating the word ‘alien’ from state labor laws - as fresh evidence that California is virtually the undisputed “most friendly state for immigrants.”

Network correspondent Luis Megid noted the new law follows on the heels of a series of others, including those that make deportations more difficult (sanctuary city policies), driver’s licenses, health care benefits and student financial aid to various categories of unauthorized immigrants in the country.

No wonder that all of the above, coupled with the state’s most recent minimum wage hike, makes unauthorized immigrants like Marco Chan, who was interviewed by Megid, enthuse about how much he “likes it here in California” and how he now doesn’t feel “persecuted.”

With regard to the new law striking the word “alien” from state labor laws, Megid neglected to include the perspective of anyone opposed to the move, much less anyone opposed to the overall trend highlighted in the report.

Instead, viewers were solely treated to the politically correct perspective of the author of the legislation, state senator Tony Mendoza.

SEN. TONY MENDOZA (D-CA): Eliminating that word, we are sending the message that the United States is a country of immigrants.

LUIS MEGID, CORRESPONDENT: To the author of the law, the word is offensive.

SEN. TONY MENDOZA (D-CA): Because it is unnecessary, offensive and denigrating to our community.

Both Ramos and Megid framed the story in a way that effectively echoed Mendoza’s remarks, saying “promoters of the measure consider the term to be unfairly scornful against those who contribute to the country’s economy and immigrant tradition” and that “for some time now, in its daily use, ‘alien’ has taken on a negative connotation very close to that of the controversial term ‘illegal immigrant.’”

Underscoring his approval of it all, Megid concluded by saying “without the possibility of immigration reform on the horizon, at least this state has decided not to wait.”

The relevant portions of the referenced national news program appear below:

Noticiero Univisión 8/11/2015 6:30 PM

JORGE RAMOS, ANCHOR: California has once again showed itself to probably be the most friendly state for immigrants. It just passed a law to eliminate the word "alien" or foreigner from its labor codes. The promoters of the measure consider the term to be unfairly scornful against those who contribute to the country’s economy and immigrant tradition.

...

LUIS MEGID, CORRESPONDENT: ...the state’s government, which believes in the power of words, just eliminated by law a term in the labor code that, for those who were not born here, can almost be offensive. In the English dictionary, "alien" simply means "someone who belongs to another country" but for some time now, in its daily use, "alien" has taken on  a negative connotation very close to that of the controversial term "illegal immigrant."

SEN. TONY MENDOZA (D-CA): Eliminating that word, we are sending the message that the United States is a country of immigrants.

LUIS MEGID, CORRESPONDENT: To the author of the law, the word is offensive.

SEN. TONY MENDOZA (D-CA): Because it is unnecessary, offensive and denigrating to our community.

LUIS MEGID, CORRESPONDENT: On its own, the measure that eliminates the use of the word "alien" is a small gesture, but put in context, it is one of various measures which, taken together, have significantly changed the relationship California has with its immigrant community, especially with those without papers. Little by little, the state has been allowing "dreamers" to obtain financial aid, it has given driver’s licenses to the undocumented, it has made deportations more difficult and uses public funds to provide health care to [undocumented] children.

MARCO CHAN, UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRANT:...I like it here in California, and even more so now that they helped us with the salary.

LUIS MEGID, CORRESPONDENT: Marcos Chan, one of three million undocumented people in California, says here he doesn’t feel persecuted. Pro-immigrant groups affirm that California is doing what Washington could not achieve...without the possibility of immigration reform on the horizon, at least this state has decided not to wait.

MRC Latino Immigration Hispanic Media Univision Jorge Ramos

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