NBC: GOP Broke 'Truce' With Obama By Vowing ObamaCare Repeal Vote

On Thursday's NBC Today, White House correspondent Chris Jansing blamed Republicans for upsetting the supposed conciliatory mood in Washington following Tuesday's GOP midterm wave: "Well, what looked to be at least a temporary truce between President Obama and Congress lasted less than 24 hours. Republican leaders now say the focus of the new Congress will be to repeal the President's signature accomplishment, ObamaCare. That after the President struck an optimistic tone in his post-election press conference."

She portrayed Obama as peacemaker: "He didn't promise any changes to his style or his staff, but he said he got the voters' message and pledged to compromise across the aisle after a new breed of Republican helped the GOP take control of the Senate."

It wasn't until near the end of the report that Jansing made any mention of Obama's inflammatory agenda: "The President also said he'll bypass Congress with an executive order on immigration reform." A soundbite played of the President laughably asserting: "But what I'm not going to do is just wait. I think it's fair to say that I've shown a lot of patience and have tried to work on a bipartisan basis as much as possible and I'm going to keep on doing so."

Jansing noted that "Republicans say that could poison the well for other deals," but she quickly tried softened Obama's hardline stance: "...the President suggested they just might work things out over a drink." A clip ran of the President joking: "I would enjoy having some Kentucky bourbon with Mitch McConnell."

Wrapping up the segment, Jansing declared: "And the Republicans say they're going to fix Congress, which would be a change, the last couple of sessions, as you know, Matt, have been the least productive in history."

Here is a full transcript of the November 6 report:

7:07 AM ET

MATT LAUER: Let's turn to politics now and the fallout from that Republican rout in the midterm elections. President Obama is now suggesting it could lead to a new wave of compromise in Washington. But, with the general election just two years away, is that possible? NBC's senior White House correspondent Chris Jansing has more on that. Hi, Chris, good morning.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: President's Mixed Message; Vows To Move Ahead On Immigration Despite GOP Win]

CHRIS JANSING: Good morning, Matt. Well, what looked to be at least a temporary truce between President Obama and Congress lasted less than 24 hours. Republican leaders now say the focus of the new Congress will be to repeal the President's signature accomplishment, ObamaCare. That after the President struck an optimistic tone in his post-election press conference.

For more than an hour, President Obama talked about what had been a crushing defeat for the Democrats, though he didn't put it that way.

BARACK OBAMA: The resounding message, not just of this election, but basically the last several, is get stuff done.

JANSING: Four years ago, he'd been more colorful after another bruising midterm.

OBAMA: Now, I'm not recommending for every future president that they take a shellacking like I did last night.

JANSING: This year, he didn't promise any changes to his style or his staff, but he said he got the voters' message and pledged to compromise across the aisle after a new breed of Republican helped the GOP take control of the Senate.

JONI ERNST: We are going to make 'em squeal!

OBAMA: As president, they rightly hold me accountable to do more to make it work properly.

JANSING: On Friday, he'll meet with congressional leaders at the White House, looking for issues to agree on. That will include Mitch McConnell, who said on Wednesday he expects to be elected majority leader.

MITCH MCCONNELL: When the American public choose divided government, I don't think it means they don't want us to do anything. I think it means they want us to look for areas of agreement.

JANSING: Some areas of agreement could include a plan to fix crumbling roads and bridges, as well as corporate tax reform. But the President also said he'll bypass Congress with an executive order on immigration reform.

OBAMA: But what I'm not going to do is just wait. I think it's fair to say that I've shown a lot of patience and have tried to work on a bipartisan basis as much as possible and I'm going to keep on doing so.

JANSING: Republicans say that could poison the well for other deals, but the President suggested they just might work things out over a drink.

OBAMA: I would enjoy having some Kentucky bourbon with Mitch McConnell.

JANSING: Well, no Kentucky bourbon summit is on the books, but this morning, the White House is planning for that big meeting with congressional leaders tomorrow. And the Republicans say they're going to fix Congress, which would be a change, the last couple of sessions, as you know, Matt, have been the least productive in history.

LAUER: Alright, Chris Jansing at the White House. Chris, thanks very much.

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