Vogue on Women’s March: New Abortion T-Shirts Could Rival Pussy Hats

Celebrating the destruction of lives in abortion is the perfect fashion statement for the upcoming Women’s March, according to Vogue.

On Wednesday, Vogue magazine published a piece announcing new Women’s March gear. “This T-Shirt Makes a Subtle Statement About Reproductive Rights, Just in Time for the Women’s March,” wrote fashion news writer Emily Farra. Reproductive rights, meaning abortion.

The already sold out striped shirts read in large letters the year “1973,” the year the Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade, the case that legalized abortion in America. The tee was created by fashion designer Nikki Kule in partnership with Prinkshop (cause-based fashion) to benefit the National Institute for Reproductive Health (NIRH), which aims to “normalize women’s decisions about abortion.”

Except for that, some things shouldn’t be normalized: like ending the life of another.

But 30% of the proceeds from the $118 tee goes to NIRH, which won it Vogue’s full support.

“Wherever you are in the country (or the world!), show your support with the Kule x Prinkshop tees, available at kule.com and prinkshop.com now,” advertised Farra.

“You might see women marching in head-to-toe black, though the color most associated with the Women’s March is hot pink, thanks in part to the pussy hat,” she added. “But you can expect to see a lot of bold stripes in the crowds, too” with these shirts.

Especially since those signature pink pussy hats, complete with cat ears, are out of style according to Phoebe Hopps, founder and president of Women's March Michigan.

“It doesn’t sit well with a group of people that feel that the pink pussyhats are either vulgar or they are upset that they might not include trans women or nonbinary women or maybe women whose (genitals) are not pink,” she recently told the Detriot Free Press.

But these shirts could be the perfect replacement, even though Farra anticipated that 1973 would prove confusing for some Americans.

“While many people will immediately know why it’s stamped across your shirt, it will spark a conversation if they don’t,” she hyped.

To those “slogan-tee naysayers out there,” Farra cited NIRH president Andrea Miller.

“Fashion is about making a statement and showing who you are, and in this moment, everything is political,” she quoted Miller as saying. “Right now, we’re seeing all of these attacks on women’s rights—women being denied affordable access to contraception, or being denied access to health care and insurance.”

Prinkshop designer Pamela Bell added in the story, “For us, what better way to show that you care about something than wearing it on your chest?”

Abortion tees wouldn’t be surprising at this year’s Women’s March later this month – considering that, from the beginning, they’ve excluded pro-life women.


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Abortion
Katie Yoder's picture