Tim Graham

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Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the forthcoming book Unmasked: Big Media's War Against Trump as well as the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

So much for "inclusion." Vogue has posted a new interview with five female presidential candidates by New York Times reporter/feminist Amy Chozick. Marianne Williamson is missing -- Chozick didn't interview her, and she wasn't at the Annie Liebovitz photo shoot. Even the headline wasn't inclusive: "Madam President? Five Candidates on What It Will Take to Shatter the Most Stubborn Glass Ceiling."



Stephanie Wilkinson, the Virginia restaurant owner that threw Sarah Huckabee Sanders and her friends out of her restaurant, is taking another turn writing a #Resistance article for The Washington Post, this time sticking up for a server in a Chicago eatery allegedly spitting on the president's son, Eric Trump.  Wilkinson boasted there are "new rules" and "restaurants are now part of the soundstage for our ongoing national spectacle." In the Trump era, "it’s not okay to ask employees, partners or management to clock out of their consciences when they clock in to work."



On Sunday's Reliable Sources, CNN host Brian Stelter aired a four-minute fraction of his 22-minute podcast interview with author and advice columnist E. Jean Carroll, who alleges Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in a department store dressing room at some point in 1995 or 1996. He left out this preachy moment from the very end: "It is always a great time to reevaluate  and talk about the relationships between men and women, and power of men in this society. And it does seem like the Trump presidency is one long class about the patriarchy."



Planned Parenthood handed out their annual Media Excellence Awards last week. They used to be called "Maggie Awards," after their founder Margaret Sanger. They proclaimed "We are so thankful for their fearless and honest reporting about what is at risk when people are denied one of their most fundamental human rights — their access to health care." But some of these don't award "excellence" -- they award fake news in defense of Planned Parenthood.



USA Today TV critic Kelly Lawler was less than impressed at the latest "docudrama" trashing the life and legacy of Fox News creator Roger Ailes on Friday. She said it "will likely have Fox talking heads discussing a 'liberal media bias'  (or liberal Hollywood, take your pick). But as much as Voice will anger many Fox News lovers, it isn't necessarily more than a shlock horror show for the haters." 



The Pew Research Center reported Thursday on its latest poll, which found Republicans don't trust the "independent fact checking" groups. They described it this way: "As fact-checking organizations are increasingly being tapped to fight against misinformation, Republicans appear to have serious concerns about the fairness of these groups. Democrats, on the other hand, mostly think they are fair to all sides." Seventy percent of Republicans said fact-checkers tend to favor one side, compared with 29 percent of Democrats.



One reason many Americans don’t trust those “fact checker” websites is because to know them is to see right through their incessant liberal worldview. These impartial arbiters of truth routinely defend Democrats as being “Mostly True” on everything, while savaging Republicans as just the opposite. It's not just Trump, mind you. It's Cruz, and Santorum, and Gingrich, and pretty much anyone who challenges liberal orthodoxy. So it was maddening that NBC News put its “fact checker” Jane Timm on the first Democrat debate, who then proclaimed on their “NBC News Now” live-stream that “we had a pretty clean debate.”



The huge journalism museum called the Newseum is closing in December at its current location in the center of Washington, but it's going out in the usual liberal style: with a new exhibit paying tribute to Jon Stewart's 16-year fake-news tenure on The Daily Show on Comedy Central. In Friday's Washington Post, feature writer Rudi Greenberg touted all the (liberal) excitement:



Axios reported that CNN media correspondent and Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter has begun a book about "Fox News in the age of President Trump, and Trump in the age of Fox." The publisher is One Signal, an imprint of Simon and Schuster. The publisher says the book will go "behind the scenes of a TV network and a White House merging in unprecedented fashion."



Washington Post political reporter Amber Phillips jetted right past objectivity on Wednesday and ranted about the lack of outrage over author E. Jean Carroll's allegations of sexual assault by Donald Trump in a dressing room from the mid-1990s. In the cover story of Thursday's edition of the Post's free tabloid Express, the headline was this: "Last week, E. Jean Carroll became the 16th woman to accuse Donald Trump of sexual misconduct. And Washington shrugged."



In Wednesday's USA Today, Ari Fleischer, the first press secretary for President George W. Bush, offered a list of tough questions the NBC/MSNBC/Telemundo moderators could ask the Democrats. The headline in the paper was "Ask Democrats tough questions about culture and economics. Put them on the spot." 



On June 21, New York magazine published a shocking cover story, an excerpt from the new book by author and advice columnist E. Jean Carroll, titled What Do We Need Men For? Carroll described suffering a sexual assault in a Bergdorf Goodman department store dressing room. The alleged assailant is named Donald Trump. When did this occur? She vaguely guesses it “has to be in the fall of 1995 or the spring of 1996” because of what they were wearing. 



For decades, Carl Cameron was a top political reporter for Fox News. But now he says he left because "right-wing hosts drowned out straight journalism with partisan misinformation." He said this in a promotional video for a new partisan left-wing website called Front Page Live, which hopes to be the "antidote" to the Drudge Report. "What’s a former Fox guy doing here on Front Page Live partnering with progressives? Well, it’s about facts, not partisanship."



On the PBS NewsHour on Friday night, liberal analyst Mark Shields and "conservative" analyst David Brooks aggressively agreed with each other, as usual -- this time, in defending Democrat front-runner Joe Biden after he brought up working with segregationist Democrats in the 1970s to get work done. Brooks, a New York Times columnist, compared segregationists to "homophobes," which is highly offensive if it's used to describe social conservatives and orthodox religious people. Shields shamed Biden's Democrat opponents as purists who would make a minority party.



The Washington Post put the December beheading of two young female Scandinavian hikers in Morocco on the front page with this strange headline: "In 2 brutal killings for Islam, a weapon for the far right." Doesn't that devalue the victims? Can the Post imagine this headline? "In brutal killing of columnist Khashoggi, a weapon for The Washington Post."



Adam Kredo at the Washington Free Beacon reported Congressman Jack Bergmann, a Republican from Michigan, wrote a letter to the congressional radio and television gallery demanding "the immediate suspension of press credentials" for Al-Jazeera, which is a press arm of the government of Qatar.



Oberlin College in Ohio has devolved into one of academe’s most infamous examples of political correctness. Now Oberlin’s administration is being punished in a very significant way for a very significant offense, and it’s about time. It has taken political correctness to an abusive extreme. The Wall Street Journal opinion section headline summed it up: “Oberlin Pays for Smearing the Town Grocer.” They have been ordered to pay $44 million in damages to Gibson’s Food Market and Bakery.



The Washington Post issued a Planned Parenthood press release on Thursday, badly disguised as a "news article." Ariana Eunjung Cha's dispatch was loaded with PP boilerplate. The Trump team has a "gag rule" that hurts the "women's health care provider" and "endangers the health of millions of women." Millions of babies are not to be considered. 



The Washington Free Beacon reported two fact-manglings at the scene of MSNBC on Wednesday. Reporter Vaughn Hillyard weirdly claimed President Trump didn't mention abortion in his re-election campaign launch in Orlando on Tuesday night. MSNBC host Kasie Hunt claimed Biden was courting controversy with kind words about segregationist Republicans. They were southern Democrats. 



Naturally, the liberal media is sending its "fact checkers" to undercut President Trump's big rally announcing his re-election campaign in Orlando on Tuesday night. Washington Post Salvador Rizzo touted their Trump-obsessing database of more than 10,000 "false or misleading statements" and warned there were "False statements about special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation."