Tim Graham

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Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the new book Unmasked: Big Media's War Against Trump as well as the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001 and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

A journalist getting assigned to a second-tier presidential candidate should probably be upset at the assignment, as far as their career aspirations go. But CNN reporter Rebecca Buck -- who had turns at BuzzFeed and the Washington Examiner -- concluded her term as Team Zucker's embed assigned to Cory Booker's campaign with a flourish of superlatives in a 15-part Twitter thread. He's morally earnest! He's loving! He made people cry! He's like Oprah! 



At the end of the 3 pm hour on MSNBC, Ali Velshi brought on Michael Kirk, the executive producer of the long-running (left-spinning) PBS documentary series Frontline. Velshi highlighted a video clip focusing on Sarah Palin as an avatar of division in the Obama years...and never mentioned that in 2013, MSNBC afternoon host Martin Bashir resigned in disgrace after insisting she should literally be force-fed human feces. So who again was divisive in the Obama years? 



CNN Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter organized a panel on Sunday to address a letter posted on CNN.com by 13 former press secretaries -- nine of them with Clinton or Obama, and three of them paid CNN analysts -- demanding regular briefings at the White House, State Department, and Pentagon. But Stelter really hated the White House response:



One of the routine ways the "independent fact checkers" demonstrate a liberal bias is by leaping to attack conservatives for making a rhetorical flourish on cable news. On Tuesday, PolitiFact threw a Pants On Fire" verdict at former U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley for saying no government is protesting the killing of Iranian teerrorist mastermind Qasem Soleimani, only Democrats are "mourning the loss of Soleimani."



It took until September of 2018 -- 31 years into her House career -- for Time magazine to devote a cover story to Nancy Pelosi, and it was a doozy.  Now Molly Ball is coddling Pelosi again in a second cover story. She "outmaneuevered Trump on policy," racked up "landmark court victories" against Trump's executive branch, and impeached Trump. Time even offered a gushy publicity video, complete with musical soundtrack.



Ricky Gervais, the perpetually snarky British comedian, set social media on fire after he mocked arrogant Hollywood in his opening monologue as host of the Golden Globe Awards. “You’re in no position to lecture the public -- about anything. You know nothing about the real world. Most of you spent less time in school than Greta Thunberg.” Everything that followed only underlined his point about celebrities being educated.



Paul Bedard at the Washington Examiner reported former NBC anchor Tom Brokaw gave an interview to NBC's NFL sideline reporter Michele Tafoya for the magazine Artful Living and complained "I think the most extraordinarily powerful tool and the most destructive development in modern life is the current media." What? He suddenly hates the media? Listen closer. He doesn't like social media, and how there's no fact-checking.



One of the most annoying long-term trends in media labeling is using the words "conservative" or "right-wing" to describe not only American conservatives, but the worst tyrants abroad, from Soviet communists to now Iranian terrorists. NPR anchor Mary Louise Kelly interviewed a spokesman for a "right-wing news agency with close ties to Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard force, or IRGC."



The Washington Post is so exquisitely sensitive to mockery of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that an unflattering image of her became a small scandal. Their headline was "Rep. Stefanik tweets altered photo of Pelosi in GOP fundraising appeal".



Susan Rice is best known as the top Obama adviser who lied on five different network talk shows in 2012, claiming the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi was caused by a YouTube video. But MSNBC put Rice on the air shortly after President Trump's speech about Iran on Wednesday as a "fact checker."



In the wake of Qasem Soleamani's death, CNN host Brian Stelter insisted patriotism is defined by tough questions. There’s nothing wrong with skeptical questions. But why is it impossible to celebrate blowing up the man responsible for the deaths of untold thousands, including over 600 Americans? And why do they so often fail to muster that same sort of skeptical questioning for the tyrants and thugs opposing American interests? Theirs is a long, sordid history of offering unchallenged platforms and even buttery sympathy to our enemies.



Washington Post "Fact Checker" Glenn Kessler was one of many liberal pundits tapped by the Columbia Journalism Review to assess the challenges of Campaign 2020. Kessler found it "incredibly depressing" that Trump never seems to change his misleading ways after being flagged 15,000 times by the Post.



On Sunday's Reliable Sources, host Brian Stelter began the show with a passionate commentary about how "patriotism" demands skeptical questions about the government. But which government? Erin Burnett's softballs to Iran didn't exactly evoke a feeling of patriotism. Shouldn't all governments get skeptical questions, not just ours? 



One of the worst tendencies of American media is boasting about how independent they are, and then granting the most obsequious access to our worst tyrannical enemies. CNN boss Jeff Zucker calls Fox News "state-run TV," then acts like state-run TV for our enemies in Iran. On Friday night, Erin Burnett threw softballs at Iran's representative to the UN that she would never toss at Trump administration officials.



The latest test of the "independent fact-checkers" just unfolded in a Joe Biden interview with Peter Doocy of Fox News in Dubuque, Iowa. It's cut, and dried. Biden is on record opposing Obama's decision to take out Osama bin Laden in 2011. But now he's claiming he never did. It's an easy "Pants on Fire" for PolitiFact. It's Four Pinocchios for The Washington Post. 



In his newsletter, CNN's Brian Stelter touted how Mike Allen of Axios was slamming the media. For what? "The media rarely treats Sanders, 78, with the seriousness warranted by his sustained popularity and fundraising."



Hollywood loves taking apart conservatives. So when presented with the idea of men in the highest reaches of the conservative media sexually harassing women at the office, it was manna from heaven. You’ll not find a ripped-from-the-headlines TV dramatization of Harvey Weinstein's predations. There's no hellish-office movie on the sexual abuses of Matt Lauer at NBC, or Charlie Rose at CBS. There is only Bombshell, a fictionalized account of the hostile sexist atmosphere at Fox News.



Graham Piro at the Washington Free Beacon relayed inane CNN comparisons of Iranian terrorist mastermind Qassem Soleimani with the French Foreign Legion and French president Charles de Gaulle on Thursday night's Anderson Cooper 360. Mark Levin called Cooper "frighteningly stupid."



A Canadian website reports the Reuters wire service was forced to retract a false story on the Texas church shooter. The fake news was picked up by The New York Times and Canada's National Post. The incorrect Reuters article read: “The gunman who opened fire in a Texas church on Sunday, killing two before dying from gunshot wounds, owned a shooting range and had taught its parishioners how to shoot, the Texas Attorney General said on Monday.” In reality, the man who shot the church shooter is the owner of a shooting range. 



Eddie Scarry at the Washington Examiner makes a great point about how The Washington Post blustered on Christmas Day about how Alexander Vindman was "falsely" brutalized by Trump. In the telling of Post reporters (and Russiagate enthusiasts) Greg Miller and Greg Jaffe, "An entire roster of public servants has been disparaged, bullied and in some cases banished for standing in Trump’s path as he sought to pressure Ukraine for political favors, or for testifying about his conduct afterward."