Tim Graham

Tim Graham's picture
Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

LifeSiteNews reported the Episcopal church in the diocese of Washington DC quickly passed a resolution to stop using "gendered language for God" at the Diocese's 123rd Convention. The resolution stated: “If revision of the Book of Common Prayer is authorized, to utilize expansive language for God from the rich sources of feminine, masculine, and non-binary imagery for God found in Scripture and tradition and, when possible, to avoid the use of gendered pronouns for God.” Somehow The Washington Post missed this vote for an "expansion" of God.


Soopermexican at The Right Scoop arrived first at the latest example of Jim Acosta banging a can against Team Trump on Tuesday night for describing some "Dreamers" as too lazy to apply for DACA status to prevent them from deportation. Chief of staff John Kelly told The Washington Post some were "too lazy to get off their asses." This sounds designed to get Acosta's goat. 


President Trump heard someone yell “treason” in the audience at a speech in Cinncinati as he mentioned the Democratic pouting at the State of the Union address. “Somebody said, treasonous,” he mused. “I mean, yeah, I guess, why not?” The media outrage was summarized by CNN analyst Jeffrey Toobin : “It is so grotesque! It is so appalling...I just wonder what the cost is, in terms of the future of our civic discourse!” We should just start laughing at the press. What hypocrites.


While the Super Bowl had no hint of a national-anthem protest, liberals still found something to be angry about – “cultural appropriation” of two famous black men. Washington Post reporting intern Sonia Rao began: “In 2018, we heard Martin Luther King Jr speak and saw Prince perform during the Supreme Bowl....Both instances sparked immediate backlash online.” NPR implied that somehow you can't find Martin Luther King speeches except in Dodge commercials.


Comedians of the #Resistance, applying their talents to derail President Trump, were the subject of a Washington Post story on Monday, but it’s almost impossible for liberals to identify this as liberal. Instead, a headline about liberal American University in northwest DC suggested "'Comedian in residence’ furthers study of humor’s role in social change.” Electing Trump could certainly qualify as “social change,” but the term is liberal code for “social justice,” that is liberal victory.


CNN.com posted an article by its reporters Dan Merica and Eric Bradner headlined "How #MeToo could knock the Clintons off the 2018 map." Their own history of dealing with allegations of sexual harassment and assault could haunt Democrats in the midterms. I tweeted it and said "Will this make CNN's airwaves?" A quick search suggests....No. 


Former CNN host Piers Morgan just gained an interview with President Trump for his current gig on ITV's Good Morning Britain. But someone thought Morgan was too soft on the president. Morgan launched a blistering on the BBC after it aired a 'homophobic' cartoon depicting the British journalist with his nose up President Trump's naked rump, with the presidential pants down to his knees.


Political insiders who subscribe to former New York Times and Politico reporter Mike Allen's morning e-mail newsletter -- Axios AM -- might realize it's not really a "newsletter." It's more like a "Talking Points Memo," and the talking points are reliably Democratic in tone. Allen's Friday edition previewed the Nunes memo release under the headline "1 Big Thing: The memo's price." Team Axios found anonymous White House aides who think the president is screwing up, who "recognize their could be a high cost" to Trump's decision to allow the memo's release.


On NPR’s All Things Considered on Friday night, anchor Mary Louise Kelly dismissed the whole thing as a “strange episode” where the Republicans, “the party of law and order, [was] attacking the bureau charged with enforcing law and order in this country.” Somehow, it’s not a “strange episode” that NPR is sticking up for the integrity of the FBI, when just days ago, they were reminding listeners of the leftist view: the FBI used to be a horrible violator of civil liberties when J. Edgar Hoover was in charge, with COINTELPRO investigations targeting radical leftists.


PolitiFact demonstrated its usual imbalance of aggression in its State of the Union speech coverage. President Trump’s speech drew twelve different articles with factual evaluations (seven of them False or Mostly False), while the Democratic response by Rep. Joe Kennedy III drew one evaluation – “Mostly True.” They didn't find any factual whoppers in Kennedy's address, like we're about to "slash our safety net."


Even before President Trump gave his first State of the Union, the Left was complaining that he was going to look “presidential.” They still can’t accept that he is president, and gets to give presidential speeches. But Trump took that opportunity and fully exploited it. The Democrats sitting in the chamber weren’t conceding a thing. Leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer scowled throughout. 


The train crash involving Republican members of Congress headed to a meeting at the Greenbrier resort in West Virginia was not a laughing matter, with one fatality. But CNN failed to report a tweet from one of its contributors, Democratic/socialist strategist Jonathan Tasini. He boasts about being a "CNN talking head" on his Twitter page. “Wow, btwn train full of Goopers hitting truck and this [Trey Gowdy's retirement announcement], God is working hard today to clean up the stink," he wrote.


If the State of the Union speech is an occasion for national unity, the New York Times editorial board took a few baby steps toward admitting the state of the union is strong right now. They didn't want to give all the credit to the president, but suggested his claims of national strength were true. 


President Trump’s first State of the Union address is a fine occasion to imagine how close we came to President Hillary Rodham Clinton. Imagine Hillary actually campaigned in the Midwest instead of Arizona and won closely contested Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. (Imagine the exact same congressional results.) Then imagine the dramatic difference in tone in our “news” media and entertainment elites as she prepared to deliver her first report to the nation.


The front page of Sunday’s Los Angeles Times looked like a perfect example of curated liberal bias. The dominant story on the top left was an outraged editorial from columnist Steve Lopez, on homelessness in the city. “CEASELESS CRISIS,” it screamed. Another story on homelessness sat on its right. Below, there was a gushy feature on an openly gay Olympic skier, and another gushy feature on Stormy Daniels, a porn star who allegedly had an affair with Donald Trump ten years ago. 


On Sunday, NPR host Michel Martin interviewed Maroon 5 keyboardist P.J. Morton on his solo record and a song that “caught my ear” called “Religion.” The lyrics included: “I don't think I like your religion. Don't always make the best decisions. Not saying you don't have good intentions. I know that you are only human.” Of course, this song was about evangelicals and Donald Trump, and somehow, Trump and his fans were comparable to religious backers of slavery.


Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan unleashed a personal attack on Fox News host Howard Kurtz in a Sunday book review at the most transparent “Pot, meet kettle” level of criticism. She attacked Kurtz as an insincere creature of Fox News, and as a tool of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway. Carlson’s opener is laughable, claiming there is no such thing as the media warring on President Trump. It's a "false premise" and Kurtz "knows it's not true."


Americans were used to stories about how Barack Obama drew standing ovations in every country he visited. So it was a bit surprising to see this Jerusalem Post headline: “Pence Speech Rife with Biblical References Rocks the Knesset….VP Pence’s Biblical speech to Knesset met with multiple standing ovations.” The New York Times spin was dramatically different. They couldn't even mention the ovations on that day, only the Pence visit being boycotted by Arab Christians.


Ian Schwartz at Real Clear Politics found hot talk about President Trump being a racist insect on the debut of the new Van Jones show on CNN Saturday night. Jones asked the rapper Jay-Z about the allegation that Trump talked about immigrants from "s---hole countries" (and Jones said the word again on CNN). Jay-Z called that not only "hurtful," but "misinformed," because "these places have beautiful people and beautiful everything."


The Hollywood Left flew to Utah for the Sundance Film Festival (and its homegrown Women’s March) with a small item of regret on its agenda. Just last year, they had put on their pink knit hats and marched for women’s rights with one of the most visible figures at Sundance...Harvey Weinstein.  How to handle this embarrassment? National Public Radio ran a short “Harvey who?” soundbite from Sundance founder Robert Redford.