Corinne Weaver

Corinne Weaver's picture
Contributing Writer


Corinne Weaver works as a senior analyst for the Media Research Center. As the Joe and Betty Anderlik Fellow, her coverage on tech censorship, media bias, and pro-life issues have been cited by many in the conservative movement. Corinne’s work has been featured in Fox News, the Guardian, LifeSiteNews, and the Federalist. Before her current position, Corinne graduated from Christendom College with bachelor’s degrees in English and History.

 

Latest from Corinne Weaver

Liberals should not have been so quick to change the rules for politicians online. When a federal judge declared that President Trump, as a politician, couldn’t block his Twitter followers, the ruling applied to other politicians as well. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) is being sued by former Brooklyn Assemblyman Dov Hikind for blocking him on Twitter.



Facebook may just have admitted the harm that fact-checking does to content. In a new blog post written by Facebook’s Vice President of Global Affairs Nick Clegg, the social media platform announced that it was not going to fact-check politicians during the 2020 election. “We don’t believe,” he wrote, “that it’s an appropriate role for us to referee political debates and prevent a politician’s speech from reaching its audience and being subject to public debate and scrutiny.”



Twitter has joined Team Greta. Avi Yemini, an activist who worked with Brexit journalist Tommy Robinson, was suspended from Twitter for “violating rules on platform manipulation and spam.” This retaliation came immediately after he tweeted at Greta Thunberg about her incendiary speech at the UN.

 



ISIS terrorists are posting videos and tweets and mixing propaganda in with tweets about the protests going on in Egypt. BBC journalist Abdirahim Saeed tweeted that “Isis fan boys/ bots are flooding the main Egypt protest hashtags.” As of September 23, videos watermarked with the black Isis flag were still popping up under the hashtag #ميدان_التحرير, which is Arabic for Tahrir Square. 



The general consensus among Americans is that Big Tech companies should be broken up for violating antitrust behavior. In a poll from YouGov and the thinktank Data for Progress, 60 percent of Republicans agreed that tech companies should be broken up and regulated. The poll, which was first reported by Vox, asked the opinions of 1,280 potential voters. Overall, YouGov found that seven out of ten people were in favor of breaking up Big Tech companies.



A podcast interview with CNN’s executive Vice President Andrew Morse revealed three crucial facts about CNN’s outlook on the forms of media. Morse told Variety’s Strictly Business podcast that CNN.com does not rely on President Trump for web traffic. He also said that the digital media that criticized CNN is no longer around. Finally, he slammed Facebook and Apple for being “media companies,” and for “letting down audiences.”



The media is hyping the Global Climate Strike, especially in the United States, where 800 marches were planned. Tech companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and Wikipedia have large bodies of employees who are going on strike. But are these people in touch with what Americans care about? Google Trends tweeted “In the last few weeks, we’ve been exploring how people search for the environment.



Note to lefty special interests: Pick on the Big Tech companies. They’re pushovers.  Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced at the National Press Club on September 19 that he was making massive changes to Amazon in order to fight climate change. More than 1,500 Amazon employees pledged to walk out on strike on September 20 as part of the Global Climate Strike along with other tech employees from Google and Microsoft.



Another academic study has determined that certain common phrases used on Twitter are “aggressive” or “bullying.”



In the digital country that Facebook is building, with currency, a population of 2.38 billion, and a corporate oligarchy, a new Oversight Board will act as a sort of Supreme Court. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced on September 17 that Facebook had released its charter and plan for the Independent Oversight Board. Zuckerberg wrote that the board will “protect free expression for our community.”

 



Tech companies censor users when they break the terms of service. But what happens to tech companies when they break the law? According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Twitter’s new advertising campaign in the city breaks San Francisco’s laws.



 Fact-checkers have been given an enormous amount of authority over what news stays and what cannot be allowed to flourish on Facebook. Pro-life organization Live Action found this out the hard way last week, after the platform was fact-checked by abortionists and Facebook threatened to limit the page’s outreach. Although Facebook stepped back from that decision after Senators Josh Hawley (R-MI) and Ted Cruz (R-TX) sent a letter to the company, the fact-checkers have not backed down.



Fox News apparently does not meet the standards for Facebook’s idea of journalism. Facebook’s newest feature, the News Tab, hasn’t even debuted and already it shows signs of biased against conservatives.

 



Facebook relies on the analysis of fact checkers to determine whether it should limit or boost media outlets. This backfires when the fact checkers are being investigated. 



Big Tech companies like Facebook and YouTube would like users to believe Wikipedia is the ultimate objective source of information. But a recent hack proves that contention false. On conservative organization PragerU’s Wikipedia page, the logo was changed to a more vulgar claim.



Another investigation into big tech’s business practices has been launched, this time from the states. 50 attorneys general and 48 states announced a probe into Google on September 9 for practices that “may have led to anticompetitive behavior that harms consumers.”



Microsoft President Brad Smith is one of Big Tech’s biggest advocates for censorship online.  Wouldn’t it be great if he brought that can-do attitude to the government? In an interview with Time Magazine, Smith told Romesh Ratnesar that he was not going to “rule out” a career in the government.



Another academic study about disinformation and election security has been released, this time from New York University. True to form, the research blames all facets of the right as sources of “domestic disinformation.” “Disinformation and the 2020 Election,” written by Paul M. Barrett of the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights, warned of the dangers of “disinformation” during the upcoming 2020 election.



Twitter has taken a side in favor of the killing of the unborn. David Daleiden, the undercover journalist for the Center for Medical Progress, reported that the organization had 19 tweets blocked on Twitter, at the advice of Planned Parenthood. Daleiden and Sandra Merritt face 15 felony charges for an invasion of privacy after releasing 14 videos showing the sale of aborted baby parts within Planned Parenthood in 2015.



Another member of the intellectual dark web has jumped into the world of tech development to circumvent censorship. Dave Rubin, host of the popular podcast and YouTube show The Rubin Report, announced on September 3 that he was launching a beta for his new tech company. In addition, it was also announced Tuesday that his show would be joining The Blaze TV.