Corinne Weaver

Corinne Weaver's picture
Contributing Writer


Corinne Weaver works as a senior analyst for the Media Research Center. As the Joe and Betty Anderlik Fellow, her coverage on tech censorship, media bias, and pro-life issues have been cited by many in the conservative movement. Corinne’s work has been featured in Fox News, the Guardian, LifeSiteNews, and the Federalist. Before her current position, Corinne graduated from Christendom College with bachelor’s degrees in English and History.

 

Latest from Corinne Weaver

Apps collect data about their users. What happens when a foreign government owns that data? The U.S. military did not want to find out. According to an NBC News report, the Defense Information Systems Agency advised employees to avoid using the app, TikTok, which is owned by the Chinese regulated company ByteDance.



The 2020 election is going to be fought online and the left has decided to create its own fact-check unit. The Democratic National Committee started a “counter-disinformation unit” to “serve[] as a knowledge base and intelligence unit” for the party.



Facebook announced a new policy to label state-funded media on its platform. Qatar-backed outlet Al Jazeera has a problem with that. In a letter sent by the media outlet’s lawyers to Facebook’s Vice President Jennifer Gillian Newstead and Head of Global Policy Management Monika Bickert, Al Jazeera wrote that Facebook’s policy would cause “substantial and irreparable harm” to its reputation.



Ex-founder of Wikipedia Larry Sanger’s Twitter followers reported that they couldn’t see the tweets he had put out about a social media strike. “Who wants me to organize mass tryouts of decentralized social media networks?” Sanger tweeted on Dec. 2.



“Journalists play a critical role in our society: keep the world honest and balanced. They are true servants of the people,” said Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a tweet from 2015. But it seems only certain kinds of journalists “play a critical role” on Twitter. Fox News host Pete Hegseth was censored by Twitter, apparently for posting a tweet that showed a screenshot of the manifesto said to have been written by Pensacola shooter Mohammed Alshamrani.



One of the four constitutional scholars who testified at the impeachment hearings on Dec. 3 played an instrumental role in the building of Facebook’s Oversight Board. Noah Feldman, professor at Harvard Law School and director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law, testified at the House Judiciary Committee’s public hearing.

 



YouTube defines itself as an “open video platform,” where videos that don’t break the rules are free to flourish. But a new blog from the company contradicts its own statement. “The Fours Rs of Responsibility, Part 2” detailed the 30 changes YouTube made to its algorithms in the last year in order to promote what it labelled “authoritative news” and to demote “borderline content.”



Big Tech CEOs for Apple, Google, Microsoft, and other companies signed an agreement with a labor union leader stating that they would uphold the standards set by the Paris Agreement. The United States government, under President Trump, pulled out of the Paris Agreement in 2017, the only country to do so. The statement signed by 78 CEOs said, “[M]any of us came together to rally behind the US’ participation in the Paris Agreement. We came to say we are still in.”



Project Veritas reported that its account on Twitter Ads was suspended permanently for “inappropriate content.” In a video posted to Twitter, the organization’s founder, James O’Keefe, explained how the censorship occurred. Twitter recently banned all political ads, except for cause-based ads from nonprofit and for-profit organizations. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), for example, can still run ads on Twitter. But some conservative sites have not fared as well as the SPLC.



Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey once said, “Journalists play a critical role in our society: keep the world honest and balanced. They are true servants of the people.” This seems to only apply to journalists that lean left, however. Journalist and Editor-at-large for The Post Millennial Andy Ngo was suspended on Twitter on Nov. 25 for “violating our rules against hateful conduct.” Ngo, who rose to fame by following radical Antifa groups throughout America, had tweeted at Chelsea Clinton earlier that day about trans murder rates. He was censored for his tweet.



A Facebook employee lauded by the Trump campaign in 2016 as an “MVP” is not happy that he helped President Trump’s election strategy. James Barnes, a former member of Facebook’s political ad sales team, wrote in a Facebook post on Nov. 23 that he was joining ACRONYM, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing the progressive movement



Parody accounts on Twitter are supposed to be protected under the platform’s terms of service. But the company seems to forget this fact on a regular basis. A parody account of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, @ElBloombito, was briefly suspended on Nov. 22.



Liberals complain about Big Tech platforms that allow for free and unfettered speech in political advertising. It seems as though some of these companies are listening. Google announced on Nov. 20 that it was restricting microtargeting on election ads on the platform.



A Twitter account that had been previously retweeted by President Trump was censored by the platform. Breaking News Live News had tweeted a story about Hunter Biden, former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, on Nov. 20.

 



In this era of civility, Google’s search algorithms are doing their part in keeping the peace. Google Images, the section of Google Search where users can look for images, suggests images with any phrase or word typed in the box. With the query, “punchable face,” several images crop up immediately.



Twitter appears to be doing all it can to protect those participating in the impeachment inquiry from public criticism. Liberal news outlet BuzzFeed noted that the phrase “I hired Donald Trump to fire people like Yovanovitch” was trending on the morning of Nov. 15.



Twitter has banned political ads -- except for some “cause-based” ads it still thinks are important. After Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced that all political ads were to be banned from the platform, both the left and the right were concerned about their ads.



Google makes many claims about its search engine. The results are not curated, they are not manipulated, and there is no blacklist of sites, says the company. However, none of these statements are true, according to an extensive investigation from The Wall Street Journal.



The founder of the liberal crowdsourced information platform Wikipedia, which received $2 million from liberal billionaire George Soros, is launching a social media site to rival Facebook and Twitter.  Jimmy Wales said in a tweet that WT:Social is a response to the “fake news and low quality content” that can be found on Facebook and Twitter.



Donald Trump Jr. warned of the large liberal influence that Big Tech companies such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter have on elections in an exclusive interview with Media Research Center president and founder, L. Brent Bozell.