In the Hulu original series released March 15 and aptly titled Shrill, for how annoying it is, Saturday Night Live’s Aidy Bryant plays Annie, an overweight journalist who is trying to be more in touch with herself and find a healthy amount of self-esteem in her life to deal with her job, her parents, and her relationships.



Like any good liberal disciple, CBS’s Madam Secretary is back preaching about the fire and brimstone of climate change during Lent. The metaphor becomes more apt when the show literally goes against religious believers who dare question the will of scientists and fear-mongering politicians. After all, we’re "past the point of no return" already.



In case you missed the premiere episode of Starz’s Now Apocalypse last week and tuned into the March 17 episode titled “Where’s My Mind?”, you may have been shocked to see a few scenes of graphic sex. Rest assured, this episode is looking rather tame compared to the aggressive first episode.



On March 15, Netflix dropped a dark new animated sci-fy anthology series called Love, Death + Robots. The episodes boast many styles and animation teams across many different countries, but the one thing they have in common is a love of outrageously inappropriate material. Everything from violence to language to sex is up-close and personal in all the wrong ways. Looks like Netflix is quickly becoming the sex hub of streaming services.



The week’s not over yet, and television viewers have been treated multiple times to lectures about illegal immigration. On March 14’s episode of For the People, “This Is America,” we’re treated to a spectacular feat complete with showdowns in a federal courthouse, quick trips across the country to immigrant detention centers, and calls to ICE and Washington, DC. All because of a Guatemalan man, Merced, and his 7-year old son, Ramon.



Season three of CBS All-Access's The Good Fight is off and running with the issue of sexual harassment and the #MeToo movement. In the episode that aired March 14 titled “The One About the Recent Troubles," President Trump’s alleged scandals involving women other than his wife are brought into the mix.



Freeform’s Siren is so far beyond the channel’s slogan “a little forward” in promoting a liberal agenda, it's comical. When the show’s not wallowing in the cliched evil oil company plot, it’s doing worse with exploring polyamorous relationships. The spring finale serves as the epitome of both with a little eco-terrorism and polyamorous sex.



After its several weeks long hiatus, Fox's Star returned with its doozy of a March 13 episode, "When Stars Fall Down." Along with it returned the plight of illegal immigrant, Angel Rivera (Evan Ross), who's been moved to a sanctuary city due to concerns about ICE. His wife, Simone (Brittany O'Grady) is none too pleased or patient, even when Gravity Records owner Mateo (William Levy) is doing her, and Angel, a favor with his committment to go behind the scenes to make Atlanta a sanctuary city.



Entertainment media continue to wage war on President Donald Trump and conservatives, with major networks, cable TV, and streaming services hurling insults and ignorant opinions at every opportunity. In February alone, at least 40 separate entertainment programs attacked conservative values and/or President Donald Trump while promoting a hardcore progressive agenda.

 


Starz’s new sci-fi Millennial comedy Now Apocalypse premiered on Sunday and it had me thinking the title of the first episode “This Is the Beginning of the End” is too true. In just 30 minutes, pretty much every kind of sex and sexuality is shown: solo and mutual masturbation, heterosexual and homosexual sex, and even a form of bestiality.



TV Land’s comedy Teachers, the show that not long ago compared school shootings to bear attacks for comedic fodder, gave us a new liberal lecture on Tuesday’s episode “Teacher Depreciation Week,” claiming that “teachers aren’t the problem (for poor education), the government is,” and that budget cuts are keeping them from having adequate school supplies.



Since we last left off on TBS’s anti-religious comedy Miracle Workers, the show (which centers around our Biblical God) has continued to depict God as moronic, inept and an annoyance to everyone around Him, including the assistant He needs to help Him wipe Himself and operate a microwave oven, among other tasks.