Tim Graham

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Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

NPR and PBS "conservative" analyst David Brooks was steaming mad about anyone on Team Trump using biblical analogies about illegal immigration as they separate illegal-immigrant parents from their children after they cross the border. "Of course in the Bible it says be cruel to the refugee," sneered Brooks on NPR's All Things Considered. He called the Bible quoting "ludicrousness on stilts" on PBS. 



PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff passed over the Inspector General's report with a no-bias-found verdict: "Very tough on James Comey, saying he was insubordinate, some other tough criticism of him, but, ultimately, 500 pages concluded that the way the FBI handled it didn’t demonstrate bias." Mark Shields was unintentionally funny: "If you’re a flat-Earth person or you’re a round-Earth person, there’s something. You have got some evidence, very sparse, but nevertheless there, that there was bias on the part of FBI people against Donald Trump." Very sparse?



Feminists who embrace the "right" to abortion – the right to destroy an unborn life on a woman’s demand at any point in pregnancy – just will not accept they are powerful enough in Hollywood. Abortion scenes in TV and the movies need to be more “educational” and end the “stigma” of violence against babies, such as being torn to pieces and feeling the pain of being chemically burned to pieces. Both things have been proven true after the 20-week period, yet it remains a "stigma" against their mothers.



On Tuesday night's Rachel Maddow Show, the MSNBC host's usual elongated lecture contained a few seconds of easily identifiable falsehood. In attempting to underline just how badly Trump negotiated with the North Koreans, she claimed the communists "gave up nothing. They promised nothing." This at the very least left out three American hostages released. 



Mike Brest at the Daily Caller reported former FBI director James Comey told the Inspector General he couldn't figure out why Hillary Clinton's emails would end up on Anthony Weiner's computer. “I don’t know that I knew that [Weiner] was married to Huma Abedin at the time.” As dumb as this sounds, this is not a new spin for Comey. He also uncorked this I'm-seriously-uninformed line on NPR's Fresh Air and NBC's Meet the Press.



On June 6, Fox News host Sean Hannity sarcastically suggested that the Trump White House could try Hillary Clinton's tactics in the probe of her private email server. Liberals took this message and twisted it into "Hannity urges destruction of evidence." On June 12, PolitiFact took up this liberal distortion of Hannity's words....and then proclaimed it would not issue any "Truth-o-Meter" verdict on this fact-mangling.



Anyone who walks past a newsstand knows that Time magazine hates Donald Trump. In 2016, they pictured his orange face melting on the cover, and then months later, that cover face melted into an orange puddle. They considered it unthinkable that he would win. Then once he won, two different covers imagined an endangered Trump in the middle of a raging storm. 



As the networks covered the Supreme Court victory of Christian baker Jack Phillips, and he calmly explained that he wanted the right to refuse to make cakes with messages he could not support, I wondered: Shouldn't the TV networks understand the freedom he was discussing? Did it have to be compared with segregationism? After all, as private businesses, the networks are allowed to refuse to air messages they don't want to support.



On the last non-advertising page of the June 18 edition of Time magazine, with a cover mocking Donald Trump imagining himself as a king, Time oozes all over the majesty of Barack Obama in an "8 Questions" interview with former Obama aide Ben Rhodes. Try these gushers: "Is his discipline made more striking by his successor?" And: "Is it surprising that someone so charismatic believed in institutions?"



The PBS NewsHour aired two days of interviews with Bill Clinton and his co-author James Patterson. Friday's was a typical softball interview with the two authors, but on Thursday, anchor Judy Woodruff turned tough enough to tell viewers that Harvey Weinstein was a major financial backer of the Clintons, so she asked Clinton if he knew about Weinstein's transgressions against women. Clinton denied it: 



Becket Adams at the Washington Examiner pointed to the partisan nature of Trump foreign policy analysis by CNN correspondents who used to work for Barack Obama. His target? National security correspondent Jim Sciutto, who worked from 2011 to 2013 as chief of staff to Obama's ambassdor to China, Gary Locke. 



The PBS NewsHour interviewed Bill Clinton and his co-author James Patterson over two nights. On Friday night, Judy Woodruff asked liberal analyst Mark Shields about Patterson's insistence that we elect serious people to office (translation: no Trumps), which allowed Shields to launch into a tribute to Clinton, who "courageously raised taxes...and produced an economy that produced 22 million new jobs." The Clintons really should have paid him a gratuity.



What is it about our entertainment elites that makes them think they are so much wiser than everyone else? Why do they seem to think that comedians like Samantha Bee and Trump impersonators like Alec Baldwin are going to save America with their rants? 



National Public Radio touts itself as an oasis of civility. But the calm tones of its announcers belie a dramatic liberal tilt. On Thursday's Morning Edition, longtime Supreme Court reporter Nina Totenberg touted the "quiet rage" and even "bad-assery" of Sen. Mazie Hirono, Democrat of Hawaii (lifetime American Conservative Union rating: 0.73 percent). She said to people who call her liberal, "F--- them."



This little boy was bursting with life.  He learned to spell, read, do basic math. He could even sign, a talent he employed, along with his beaming smile, to shower affection on the world.  For eight years, against all odds, he persevered.

But then one night, Paulie fell ill and within 24 hours, he was suddenly gone. When the news came out, an entire community was shattered



Washington Post “Fact Checker” Glenn Kessler has concentrated most of his firepower on Donald Trump. A June 1 blog post touted “President Trump has made 3,251 false or misleading claims in 497 days." So Kessler offered a tiny nod toward balance on Monday by picking apart two claims Bill Clinton made when he had a "meltdown" with NBC’s Craig Melvin.



On Friday's edition of The View, Sunny Hostin unleashed an angry tirade about people criticizing Samantha Bee instead of Roseanne Barr and Donald Trump. She reprised the full Kanye West attack on George W. Bush during a Hurricane Katrina telethon: "He doesn't care about African-Americans in this country!"



The New York Times has run advertisement underlining how "the truth is more important now more than ever." But they are still publishing accusations without evidence. Take media reporter Michael Grynbaum's story on left-wing media hero Seymour Hersh's life of "Making the Mighty Sweat." It just lays out unsupported allegations that Nixon beat his wife, Lyndon Johnson pooped on the ground to protest a journalist, and that he smoked pot with California Gov. Jerry Brown.



New York Times "gender editor" Jessica Bennett assembled a group of female Times writers to analyze Samantha Bee's feckless stunt against Ivanka Trump. Culture critic-at-large Amanda Hess suggested Bee was calling out Ivanka's "pink-washing" her father's aims with vague feminism. Opinion writer Bari Weiss replied Bee's C-word "really backfired," and she ended up "looking like a bully."



Matt Wilstein at the Daily Beast reports that Jon Stewart dismissed the scandal over Samantha Bee's vulgarity against the president's daughter as phony. In a Q&A session at the Clusterfest comedy festival in San Francisco, “They don’t give a shit about the word ‘cunt,’” he said of Donald Trump (and his voters). “That is probably—he says that instead of ‘please,’ I’m guessing.” He asserted that conservatives are playing a "game" by being offended.