How appropriate would it be for a major publicly held American company to hire a person with a history of having publicly made the following statements and many others like them? (In the interest of brevity, I shall list only four.) “The world could get by just fine with zero black people.” “It's kind of sick how much joy I get out of being cruel to old black men.” “Dumbass f---ing black people marking up the internet with their opinions like dogs pissing on fire hydrants.” “Are black people genetically predisposed to burn faster in the sun, thus logically only being fit to live underground like groveling bilious goblins?”



The topic of white nationalists was handled in a heavy-handed way during the December 9 episode of Fox’s Rel. Rel (Lil Rel Howery), an African-American man, is a charge nurse in a Chicago hospital. In “Hate & Hip Hop,” his patient turns out to be a racist who fainted during a white nationalist protest rally. The white patient isn’t impressed when Rel calls him a blood brother, as they both have O negative blood.



Just when it seemed that the reaction to the death of former President George H. W. Bush was dying down, former ESPN anchor and far-left writer Jemele Hill of The Atlantic did her best to use the situation to inflame any racist sentiments held by black Americans. The article from Hill asserted that the Obamas “were gracious to the Trumps” because they “had to be” since “black people have no choice but to act benevolently toward whites for fear of more punishment.”



Friday at the Hot Topics table, the hosts of The View argued with Utah Republican, Rep. Mia Love, pressuring her to call President Trump a racist, after he blamed her critical stance towards him as the reason why she lost to her Democrat challenger in the midterm elections. Love didn’t fold under the pressure from the liberal hosts, instead calling out Democrats for targeting her because she is a black, female Republican.



On Wednesday's Late Night with Seth Meyers, aired early Thursday, NBC host Meyers provided far-left British journalist Mehdi Hasan an unchallenged forum to excoriate former President George H.W. Bush for the deaths of Iraqis and Panamanians, as well as the Willie Horton campaign issue and Bush's reaction to the AIDS epidemic.



Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's Amanpour and Company on PBS to discuss former President George H.W. Bush's legacy, The New Yorker editor David Remnick condemned Bush's use of convicted murderer Willie Horton in the 1988 presidential campaign as "racist." Host Christiane Amanpour also suggested that Bush had run a "racist" campaign ad. 



New York Times reporter Peter Baker tastelessly marked the beginning of the four-day commemoration of the life of former President George H.W. Bush by....whining about the “dog whistle” racist Willie Horton ads from Bush’s successful 1988 campaign against Democrat Michael Dukakis. For 30 years, media conventional wisdom has been appalled at the supposedly racist campaign ads from the Bush camp criticizing the irresponsibly lax prison program of Massachusetts, which featured the story of Willie Horton, a convicted murderer who raped and killed a woman in Maryland while on a weekend furlough.



On Monday night's All In show, MSNBC viewers saw an unusually heated debate between the left and the far left as Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin battled with Esquire contributor and frequent MSNBC guest Charles Pierce over whether former President George H.W. Bush was too accommodating to the "far right."



On Sunday's Kasie D.C. show, MSNBC host Kasie Hunt devoted a segment to fretting over the use of convicted murderer Willie Horton by George H.W. Bush during the 1988 presidential campaign as the group complained that "dog whistle" campaigning has gotten worse with Donald Trump as President.



Appearing as a guest on Sunday's Reliable Sources on CNN, former longtime ABC News reporter Sam Donaldson misleadingly tried to tie Ronald Reagan to the Massachusetts prison furlough program supported by Michael Dukakis which allowed convicted murderer Willie Horton to escape prison and attack others.



The Simpsons repeated the popular left-wing narrative of rampant racism in the United States in season 30, episode nine, titled “Daddicus Finch,” which aired on Sunday night.



Since the passing of former President George H.W. Bush, most of the networks have revisited one of the longstanding liberal peeves against the former Republican President -- that he brought to the attention of voters the fact that 1988 Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis supported a prison furlough program that allowed a convicted murderer, Willie Horton, to violently attack a couple while he was free. And, in doing so, the networks have also repeated the recurring myth that Bush's campaign was responsible for "the Willie Horton ad" that used a mug shot of Horton, thus revealing his race, when, in reality, the version of the ad run by the Bush campaign did not use the image and made no hint that Horton was black.