The company behind “World of Warcraft” has been vilified by its fans and its employees have walked out in protest after it banned a professional gamer for supporting Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters.Activision Blizzard employees walked out of work on Tuesday at their campus in Irvine, California. The walkout happened after Blizzard announced a one-year suspension and withheld prize money from Hong Kong-based competitive Hearthstone player Chung Ng-wai, better known as “Blitzchung.”



Facebook is standing by its new approach to political advertising, despite sharp criticism from the left. Former Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential campaign asked Facebook to remove President Trump’s ad on Oct. 8, according to The New York Times.



Video game industry legend Mark Kern disavowed Blizzard for kowtowing to Chinese censorship, encouraging gamers to “rise up” and “#BoycottBlizzard.” Kern, who grew up in Asia, was involved in some of Blizzard Entertainment’s most famous games. He worked as a producer for demon-slaying epic “Diablo 2” and as a team lead on “World of Warcraft.”



Entertainment empires are turning to artificial intelligence to prevent offensive scripts from heading to the big screen. Actress and activist Geena Davis announced that her new digital tool, “GD IQ: Spellcheck for Bias,” will partner with Disney Studios, which includes ABC News and 20th Century Fox.



Are gangs now off-limits to crime-fighting superheroes? Allegedly, the South American MS-13, whose motto is “kill, rape, control” is considered to be a “marginalized group” by Big Tech liberals. American comic book creator Mike S. Miller alleged via his Twitter account on Oct. 2 that Kickstarter had deplatformed his comic book project on the grounds that it “subjugated” a “marginalized group.” Miller tagged many conservative media leaders and cited this incident as “[m]ore wokeness from the tech companies on display.”



Democrats want to persecute any business, person, or group that has helped or even simply not hindered President Donald Trump. Even top social media companies. Senator and Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren came after Facebook on Twitter on Oct. 7, for “help[ing] elect Donald Trump once” and for labeling her own campaign as “an ‘existential’ threat to Facebook.”



Another American company bowed to Chinese censorship in order to protect their bottom line. Blizzard Entertainment found itself in the same hot water as the NBA about China. The computer gaming firm, famous for titles such as “World of Warcraft” and “Starcraft,” has publicly announced a one-year suspension as of Oct. 8 for a professional video game player Chung Ng-wai, better known as Blitzchung. His crime? Shouting a Hong Kong protest slogan, “Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our times!” 



Facebook is taking a free-speech approach to political campaign ads, and letting users decide what is or is not fake news. Naturally, the left is upset about it. President Trump’s re-election campaign launched a new ad both on television and social media last week that condemned Vice President Joe Biden’s role in the Ukraine controversy. 



The liberal media are ready to redefine social media platforms as something only they can use freely. Harvard Kennedy School’s Joan Donovan and Data and Society head Danah Boyd wrote in a white paper that tech companies were responsible for a “new wave of hate groups.”



In a recent piece on Amazon’s “Day One” blog, Amazon detailed some of the “[n]ew ways Alexa makes life simpler and more convenient” and “your home smarter and safer” all the while keeping your “family and friends connected, and bring[ing] your favorite entertainment to  you, wherever  you are.”



Strange political times make for unexpected allies as Democratic primary candidates defend Trump’s right to have a platform on Twitter. Democratic presidential nominee rivals Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts rejected comments by Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris (D-CA) calling for Trump to be suspended from Twitter.



The massive search engine monopoly that is Google is now defending small businesses and it did so on Fox Business. That raises an interesting question: Do conservatives suddenly look more appealing to Big Tech in the face of regulatory statements by Democrat candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).