Many fans were dismayed when PewDiePie, YouTube’s biggest individual creator, planned to donate to the censorious ADL. Today he has recanted after the backlash and says he will instead donate his money elsewhere. Yesterday PewDiePie, whose real name is Felix Kjellberg, appeared to pledge $50,000 to the ADL, an organization that attacked him and has famously put out hit lists of politically-incorrect YouTubers worthy of deplatforming. 



Fox News apparently does not meet the standards for Facebook’s idea of journalism. Facebook’s newest feature, the News Tab, hasn’t even debuted and already it shows signs of biased against conservatives.

 



Facebook relies on the analysis of fact checkers to determine whether it should limit or boost media outlets. This backfires when the fact checkers are being investigated. 



The most popular YouTuber on the platform is attempting to gain favor with the organization that wrote no company “has any obligation to support his wide dissemination of hate speech.” PewDiePie, whose real name is Felix Kjellberg, announced on September 10 that he will donate $50,000 to the Anti-Defamation League. Because of his previous dust-up with the ADL, subscribers and fans are skeptical. 



If nothing else, the sordid story of Jeffrey Epstein has done some good by exposing possible corruption  in academia, science, and Big Tech. Business Insider wrote that LinkedIn founder and Microsoft board member Reid Hoffman is the latest in a long list of “powerful figures attracting scrutiny for their connections to now-deceased sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.”



Big Tech companies like Facebook and YouTube would like users to believe Wikipedia is the ultimate objective source of information. But a recent hack proves that contention false. On conservative organization PragerU’s Wikipedia page, the logo was changed to a more vulgar claim.



Microsoft President Brad Smith is one of Big Tech’s biggest advocates for censorship online.  Wouldn’t it be great if he brought that can-do attitude to the government? In an interview with Time Magazine, Smith told Romesh Ratnesar that he was not going to “rule out” a career in the government.



Big Tech companies are facing their day of reckoning from the Pro-Life movement. Leading pro-life organization Live Action has gone through its fair share of confrontations with Big Tech, and now is taking the fight to the next level. In early September, Live Action’s attorneys sent cease and desist letters to YouTube and Pinterest. These letters accused them of suppressing content and breaching contracts, which resulted in money loss and damaged reputations.



Another academic study about disinformation and election security has been released, this time from New York University. True to form, the research blames all facets of the right as sources of “domestic disinformation.” “Disinformation and the 2020 Election,” written by Paul M. Barrett of the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights, warned of the dangers of “disinformation” during the upcoming 2020 election.



Hundreds of millions of Facebook users’ phone numbers have been exposed online to the public. According to TechCrunch’s September 4 story, a compromised server exposed over 419 million users across multiple countries, “including 133 million records on U.S.-based Facebook users, 18 million records of users in the U.K., and another with more than 50 million records on users in Vietnam.”



Twitter has taken a side in favor of the killing of the unborn. David Daleiden, the undercover journalist for the Center for Medical Progress, reported that the organization had 19 tweets blocked on Twitter, at the advice of Planned Parenthood. Daleiden and Sandra Merritt face 15 felony charges for an invasion of privacy after releasing 14 videos showing the sale of aborted baby parts within Planned Parenthood in 2015.



Both Republicans and Democrats are chomping at the bit to take Big Tech to task over antitrust concerns. The Hill reported on September 3 that Senate Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust will host an upcoming hearing to “explore issues relating to competition in technology markets and the antitrust agencies’ efforts to root out anticompetitive conduct.”