On his Friday Fox News show, Tucker Carlson interviewed Nick Loeb, co-producer of Roe v. Wade, a dramatic film which plans to show viewers "what happened from 1966 through 1973" that led to the Supreme Court's decision declaring existing laws against abortion unconstitutional. Carlson's interview concentrated primarily on obstacles Loeb has faced in funding the film — obstacles which have included overt and covert suppression of his efforts on Facebook. Loeb also revealed that the film will show America "how the media was manipulated" during that critical period.



When a cable-news host concludes an interview, it's customary to thank his or her guest by saying something along the lines of "I appreciate you being here" or "Thank you for your time." 

But when MSNBC fill-in host Craig Melvin wrapped his January 22 Reid Report interview with Sarah Weddington, the pro-abortion rights counsel for "Jane Roe" in 1973, he not only thanked the former Texas state legislator for his appearing on the program but also added, "I do appreciate you." 



As MSNBC marked the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, Andrea Mitchell continued the MSNBC tradition of praising the abortion rights movement and harassing the pro-life movement.  On her January 22 program, Mitchell treated Sarah Weddington, the attorney in Roe v. Wade to a cream puff of an interview, while Marjorie Dannenfelser, the head of the pro-life Susan B. Anthony List, was grilled.

Dannenfelser was the first pro-life guest on MSNBC's programming on Tuesday, the 40th anniversary of Roe. By contrast, by the 1 p.m. Eastern hour, pro-choice advocates had appeared on various MSNBC programs, all to sympathetic interviewers. Among these guests were Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards, current NARAL Pro-Choice America president Nancy Keenan and former NARAL chief Kate Michelman.  [See video after jump.  MP3 audio here.]



As many of you are doubtless already aware, the "Roe" in Roe v. Wade, Norma McCorvey, converted to Christianity in the mid-1990s and became a pro-life activist, repentant of her role in the lawsuit that 40 years ago today legalized abortion.

So you'd think that any interview with McCorvey's attorney before the Court, Sarah Weddington, would include at least one question about McCorvey's change of heart. But alas, that wasn't in the cards with TIME magazine's Valerie Lipinski in her January 22 interview with Weddington. Indeed, the entire affair was a succession of softball question after softball question, concluding with a query about whether Weddington ever goes back to listen to audio recordings of her arguments before the Supreme Court (emphasis mine):