On Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during a discussion of conservative reaction to Democratic Congresswoman Ilhan Omar dismissively referring to the 9/11 attacks as "some people did something," Washington Post columnist and MSNBC contributor Jennifer Rubin slammed Fox News as an entity that is "endangering people of color" and "destroying political thought."



The Sulzberger dynasty that publishes The New York Times does not like the Murdoch dynasty that runs the News Corporation and Fox News. They charge the Murdochs with "destabilizing democracy" around the world. What this really says is that the Times has lost its influence, and Fox News is on the rise. 



New York Times Magazine staff writer Jonathan Mahler and media reporter Jim Rutenberg teamed on a colossal, three-part investigation of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire (and family drama), using the mogul’s sale of his 21st Century Fox empire to Walt Disney as the catalyst for an incredibly noxious hit piece on Fox News, which is accused of virtually everything wrong with the world. The tone is amazingly ideological and personally hostile, perhaps the most virulent and conspiracy-minded attack on Fox News ever issued by the paper, certainly the longest one, against some stiff competition. It reads more like a paranoid left-wing screed from The Nation or In These Times than it does content for an objective newspaper.



Jaclyn Peiser’s front-page New York Times autopsy for a fading New York tabloid, “Daily News, Lean but Brassy New York Staple, Cuts Staff in Half.” Peiser mourned the brutal downsizing announced at the local tabloid rival whose hard-left turn in recent years failed to save it. The right-leaning New York Post, on the other hand, is clearly loathed by the Times.



By now, the shock and awe of Rupert Murdoch’s December 14 sale of 21th Century Fox to Disney has set in, so it’s worth a look back at how Murdoch built Fox into the mammoth film and television force it’s become today. Born in 1931, the Australian-born Murdoch has he left an indelible mark on the media industry. After inheriting his father’s media empire, he eventually acquired a slew of television stations, as well as the iconic movie studio 20th Century Fox from oil magnate Marvin Davis.



By now, you’ve probably heard the news. The Walt Disney Company has announced a definitive mega-deal to merge with Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox, which includes the FX cable channel and – more importantly – the 20th Century Fox motion picture studio. The deal is worth over $50 billion, and is set to close by the end of next year. It does not, however, include the FOX Broadcasting Company, FOX News, FOX Business, and channels such as FS1 and FS2 — all of which will be spun off into an independent company.



According to New York Times media reporter and columnist Jim Rutenberg, only the right side of the media aisle is trying to make news, while the dominant mainstream side (including his newpspaer) is as fair and objective as can be. Rutenberg launched another attack on Rupert Murdoch’s media empire for failing to ignore Russia-related controversies on the Democrat side of the aisle, in his Wednesday column, “Closing Ranks, Murdoch Empire Sows Doubts on Russia Inquiry.” It’s the latest piece suggesting Rutenberg is not a fan of investigative reporting -- at least when it risks hurting Hillary Clinton. He also let CNN, which has gotten many anti-Trump stories wrong, praise itself for working in the public interest.



The Twitter website has become the go-to place for people in the “mainstream media” who have said things they wish they hadn’t stated on television. They can then apologize in a format that far fewer individuals will notice. A perfect example of this principle took place on Tuesday, August 22, by Bret Stephens, a right-of-center columnist for the New York Times who was also hired by NBC News and MSNBC on Wednesday, June 28.



It’s always nice when someone remembers your birthday, but Marc Lamont Hill -- a liberal commentator for the Cable News Network -- took the tradition in a bizarre direction on Sunday, July 16, when he commemorated the 70th birthday of Assata Shakur, a convicted murderer and known terrorist, in a series of tweets posted on the Twitter website.



The front page of Friday’s New York Times featured a graceless goodbye to former Fox News chairman and chief executive Roger Ailes (and an insult to Fox News viewers): “A Fighter Who Turned Rage Into a News Empire” by Clyde Haberman. Even upon his passing, the Times maintained its hostility toward a man who found a wide and instantly receptive audience who latched on to a point of view clearly absent from the mainstream media’s liberal universe.



The front of Wednesday’s New York Times sported a 2,600-word enterprise piece by Katrin Bennhold with a peculiar focus on fellow journalists, those of the allegedly right-wing tabloid irresponsible variety: “Did Tabloids Cause ‘Brexit’? It’s Covered With Inky Fingerprints.”  Bennhold condescendingly blamed the right-wing tabloid press for Brexit (while her paper steadfastly denies its own pro-Clinton, anti-Trump slant throughout the last presidential campaign). 



If there’s ever a Donald Trump-centric TV channel, it’s likely that not all of its big names would be from the populist right, hinted What Liberal Media? author Alterman in his column for The Nation's November 14 issue. Alterman claimed that MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough “has made some of the most egregious pro-Trump arguments heard anywhere during this election cycle” and, regarding Bloomberg’s Mark Halperin, wrote, “The famous inside-baseballer has bathed himself repeatedly in Trump’s orange glow, posting romantic-style selfies with the nominee from his helicopter and defending his racist arguments about Mexicans and guns, among many other outrages.”