One of the internet’s foremost tech journalists blasted the owner of Fox News and The Wall Street Journal as the “largest menace to the modern world.” Recode co-founder and New York Times contributor Kara Swisher wrote in a tweet on Jan. 8, 2020, “If you had to pick one person who has been the largest menace in the modern world, spreading hate and disinformation that has disastrous results everywhere he goes, Rupert Murdoch or, as I like to call him, Uncle Satan, would top the list.”



Sydney-based New York Times reporter Damien Cave found yet another thing to blame on the conservative press and in particular Australian-born newspaper mogul Rupert Murdoch: “Murdoch Manipulates Debate on Australia’s Fires.” The front of the Business Day section on Thursday featured the Sydney-based reporter committing his standard Murdoch-demonizing opinions to the Times’ so-called news pages: "Yet, for many critics, the Murdoch approach suddenly looks dangerous."



Aging acting coach Sandy Kominsky, once a successful actor, and his best friend, his longtime agent Norman Newlander, are back in Season Two of Netflix’s The Kominsky Method. Airing on October 25, the eight episodes, each one-half hour long, are an easy and enjoyable binge. The only problem is that Chuck Lorre, the Executive Producer, is an openly anti-Trump member of the Hollywood community so there are a few random anti-Republican, anti-Trump remarks.



On Monday's New Day, the three-hour CNN show treated viewers to a parade of one guest after another who pushed for more gun laws in reaction to the weekend's mass shootings. Even Republican-leaning guests like CNN contributor John Kasich and former Donald Trump advisor Anthony Scaramucci came down on the liberal side of the issue. No one noted the argument that the killers in both El Paso and Dayton cose targets that were gun-free zones, or pointed out that nearly all new gun laws proposed would have had nothing to do with the circumstances of either attack.



James Poniewozik, the New York Times’ chief TV critic, ran a fevered attack on three recent works -- two television shows and a play -- that render media mogul Rupert Murdoch and his outlets, including the Roger Ailes-led Fox News, in unflattering terms. The headline hid the inflammatory nature of the text: “Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes Gave Us Fox. These Shows Try to Make Sense of It All – ‘The Loudest Voice,’ ‘Ink’ and ‘Succession’ map out the influential world the two men created.” With the media and entertainment culture almost monopolized by the left save for Fox News, it’s Fox that somehow represents an ideological danger.



On Real Time Friday, host Bill Maher closed his satirical segment “New Rules” by urging First Lady Melania Trump to dump the President, arguing that her doing so would enable President Trump to “implode on his own.” Maher also encouraged Rupert Murdoch’s wife, Jerry Hall, to do the same before describing Fox News as an “axis of evil” and comparing the Trump base to “an army of brain-dead zombies.”



As Australia’s election looms, the New York Times’ Australia bureau chief Damien Cave is spreading opposition research for the liberals in “Toxic Speech Derails Politicians in Australia. Some Call It Progress.” Cave, paranoid as ever about racism in conservative politics, managed to string together some tasteless social media posts into a general condemnation of conservative politics worldwide, for Friday’s New York Times. He blamed the usual suspects: "These groups have already had some success. Their perspective on immigrants is frequently found in the Murdoch-run news media..."



On Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during a discussion of conservative reaction to Democratic Congresswoman Ilhan Omar dismissively referring to the 9/11 attacks as "some people did something," Washington Post columnist and MSNBC contributor Jennifer Rubin slammed Fox News as an entity that is "endangering people of color" and "destroying political thought."



The Sulzberger dynasty that publishes The New York Times does not like the Murdoch dynasty that runs the News Corporation and Fox News. They charge the Murdochs with "destabilizing democracy" around the world. What this really says is that the Times has lost its influence, and Fox News is on the rise. 



New York Times Magazine staff writer Jonathan Mahler and media reporter Jim Rutenberg teamed on a colossal, three-part investigation of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire (and family drama), using the mogul’s sale of his 21st Century Fox empire to Walt Disney as the catalyst for an incredibly noxious hit piece on Fox News, which is accused of virtually everything wrong with the world. The tone is amazingly ideological and personally hostile, perhaps the most virulent and conspiracy-minded attack on Fox News ever issued by the paper, certainly the longest one, against some stiff competition. It reads more like a paranoid left-wing screed from The Nation or In These Times than it does content for an objective newspaper.



Jaclyn Peiser’s front-page New York Times autopsy for a fading New York tabloid, “Daily News, Lean but Brassy New York Staple, Cuts Staff in Half.” Peiser mourned the brutal downsizing announced at the local tabloid rival whose hard-left turn in recent years failed to save it. The right-leaning New York Post, on the other hand, is clearly loathed by the Times.



By now, the shock and awe of Rupert Murdoch’s December 14 sale of 21th Century Fox to Disney has set in, so it’s worth a look back at how Murdoch built Fox into the mammoth film and television force it’s become today. Born in 1931, the Australian-born Murdoch has he left an indelible mark on the media industry. After inheriting his father’s media empire, he eventually acquired a slew of television stations, as well as the iconic movie studio 20th Century Fox from oil magnate Marvin Davis.