On Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC, as the show spent much of its time reacting to President Donald Trump's response to white racists rallying in Charlottesville last weekend, recurring MSNBC guest and self-described Republican Richard Painter repeatedly demonized the Christian right as he lumped them in with white racists as extremists who should be denounced by Trump and other Republican leaders to drive them out of the party. Painter -- a former legal counsel for the George W. Bush White House -- trashed conservative Christians as "fake Christians" and "phony Christians" who "couldn't read a Bible if they tried."

 


One can always count on the left to overreach. Thursday’s Hardball featured MSNBC legal analyst Paul Butler arguing that President Trump’s Charlottesville response was only a continuation of “white racism” put forth by former Republican Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. To make the show’s more loony, guest Erroll Southers later argued that “the right-wing” is “the greatest threat to our nation’s homeland and national security” thanks to Trump.


On Saturday afternoon, an act of racist terrorism was committed in Charlottesville, Virginia. Among those responsible, according to Esquire’s Charles Pierce, were Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush. “Every Republican who ever played footsie with the militias out west owns this bloodshed,” disgorged Pierce in a Sunday post. “Every Republican president -- actually, there's only one -- who began a campaign in Philadelphia, Mississippi, to talk about states rights...owns this bloodshed…Every Republican politician who followed the late Lee Atwater into the woods in search of poisoned treasure owns this bloodshed…Every conservative journalist who saw this happening and who encouraged it, or ignored it, or pretended that it wasn't happening, owns this bloodshed.”


Appearing as a guest in a pre-recorded interview for the Sunday, August 13, Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, far-left HBO comedian Bill Maher declared that he hopes there is a "crash" in the stock market so that it will hurt President Donald Trump's political support. A bit later, he also repeated a discredited myth parroted over and over again by the Left that Ronald Reagan began his 1980 presidential campaign in Philadelphia, Mississippi, as a "dog whistle" to appeal to racism.

 


The world of television and how Hollywood delivers it keeps changing. Streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon have become prestige brands whose original programming draws a pile of Emmy nominations. But as much as technology changes, some things remain the same. The entertainment factories keep ripping on Republican politicians in the crudest terms.


I have experienced defeat in presidential politics many times. Actually, I expect most Americans have. You win some, and you lose some. I first experienced defeat in 1964 when then-Sen. Barry Goldwater went down, though I was not even old enough to vote. I experienced it in 1968. I experienced it again in 1976, when my candidate was Ronald Reagan.


FX’s Snowfall continues its season-long plot about the cocaine epidemic of the 1980s. You need a reminder that the show is about the '80s? There’s no better one than an image of President Ronald Reagan inserted into a scene. But Snowfall goes one step further with another '80s pastime: hating Ronald Reagan.


The first episodes of the third season of Hulu’s Difficult People were comprised almost entirely of liberal tirades against conservative politicians. The show, which revolves around the lives of the self-absorbed Julie (Julie Klausner) and her gay friend Billy (Billy Eichner), had a field day delivering anti-conservative blows in its first three episodes, which were released on August 8.


What do you get when former presidents are used in a weird plot meant to bring old friends together and teach them some lessons in friendship? You get Netflix’s Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later, released on August 4, 2017. The bizarre story was told in eight 30-minute episodes and, along the way, former President Reagan was depicted as a diabolical nuclear warhead thief and involved with several poop jokes for good measure. Yes. Really.


One month after the election, President-elect Donald Trump made a "victory tour" of states that had helped deliver his surprise win. In Fayetteville, North Carolina, Trump introduced his choice for Secretary of Defense, Gen. James Mattis, and pledged the following: "We will stop racing to topple foreign regimes that we know nothing about, that we shouldn't be involved with. Instead, our focus must be on defeating terrorism and destroying ISIS, and we will."


On MSNBC Wednesday night, the Hardball Roundtable circled the wagons to defend CNN’s Jim Acosta after he got his clock cleaned by Stephen Miller on immigration. New York Times reporter Yamiche Alcindor led the way, treating the Statue of Liberty poem like a legally-binding document we have to abide by and blaming Ronald Reagan for supposedly pro-white pandering.


Playwright Tony Kushner, who penned the heavily left-wing, U.K. theater production “Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes,” now brings Americans yet another politically-charged play, which centers around a “mentally ill” Donald Trump.