As part of the liberal media’s all-out promotional campaign before James Comey’s Thursday morning Senate testimony, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews spun the hearing as one for the history books with Comey channeling Jimmy Stewart against a President Trump that Matthews compared to Batman’s The Joker.



Rachel Maddow has been spending a few minutes of the 10:00 p.m. Eastern hour on MSNBC's The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell on the heels of rumors O’Donnell could be axed, so it was during Wednesday's chat that Maddow suggested a report that the Trump White House hired Flynn as National Security Adviser despite knowing Flynn was under federal investigation would mark the biggest scandal in presidential history.



During Tuesday’s Situation Room, CNN host Wolf Blitzer repeatedly nudged guests to accept the notion of impeaching President Donald Trump following a New York Times piece claiming that Trump told then-FBI Director James Comey in February to end the Mike Flynn probe.



After initially refraining from making irresponsible comparisons between President Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey to the Watergate scandal, on Wednesday’s NBC Nightly News and Thursday’s Today, the network could no longer resist its liberal instincts, joining ABC and CBS in labeling Trump the new Richard Nixon.



The New York Times on Thursday trotted out liberal favorite John Dean to make the comparison journalists love to hear: (Fill in the blank Republican) is just like Richard Nixon in Watergate. The headline darkly hinted about the connections: “He Has Seen It All Before” and described the ex-White House aide as “an expert on the abuses of presidential power.” Get it? 



After surviving a targeted effort by Turkish lobbies to derail its success, the Armenian Genocide film The Promise will open in American theaters next week. And Hollywood celebs are getting the word out. 



Count on The Washington Post to wallow perpetually in its own Watergate myth. When they were trying to take down President Nixon, it somehow wasn’t a liberal power grab and a way to crumble the Vietnam War. It was all a noble crusade for “truth,” because Democrats never lied to win an election or to….start the Vietnam War.

The latest salvo is an op-ed by leftist actor-activist Robert Redford reminding the Post readership that Redford was so impressed with Woodward and Bernstein that he made a movie out of their self-promoting Journalistic Hero story. The Post headline read:  “Robert Redford: 45 years after Watergate, the truth is again in danger.”



On Thursday, Washington Post writer Dan Zak (@MrDanZak) unloaded on Twitter in general as a blabby mess. Zak was praising a satirical-Nixon account at @dick_nixon operated by a New York playwright, and dropped this bomb: 

"Most of Twitter, especially around a big event, is nonstop nonsense, the equivalent of a billion babies with a billion rattles."



As the issue of Hillary Clinton’s e-mails mushrooms, let’s take a stroll down the media’s memory lane to another time and another scandal and another woman. The scandal, of course, is the Watergate scandal and the role the tapes played in bringing down a presidency.



This week the media greeted the new GOP Congress with fears about a conservative “kamikaze caucus,” pushing “confrontation with Obama,” and stressed that if Republicans were to be successful they needed to look less “scary,” as they pointed out the 114th Congress was “80 percent white, 80 percent male and 92 percent of its members are Christian.” But in 2007, when Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats took over the House, the tone from the liberal media was very different.



The Washington Post has already declared the Best Books of 2014, with five weeks left to go. As usual, a pile of liberal favorites, like Capital by French socialist Thomas Piketty were on the list. There was one surprising result: the Post's Top 50 Nonfiction Books has three Obama-cabinet memoirs on the list, including the doorstop by presidential candidate Hillary Clinton:



Liberals seeking examples of conservative craziness often look for the wrong thing. That's the word from California writer Paul Rosenberg, who in a Thursday piece for Salon stated that "the wild-eyed kind of crazy we’ve all been led to expect" is much less common than "the button-down, conservative kind we heard in the Donald Sterling tape — or that we can hear on [Rush] Limbaugh’s radio show, or see on Fox News any day of the week."
 
It gets worse. Rosenberg notes that "conservatives as a group routinely score significantly higher" for a personality trait that's linked to psychopathy, and reports that some in academia "are beginning to ask, in effect, if [right-wingers are] actually defending, even promoting, evil."