New York Times impeachment testimony coverage on Thursday almost completely ignored the labored, pseudo-clever mean pun from law professor Pamela Karlan, who bizarrely named Trump’s 13-year-old son Barron to make some unrelated point. The controversy, which inflamed Republicans and even made some liberals cringe, was relegated to the last two paragraphs of the paper’s large front-page story.” The hidden bias was the partisan manner in which the main congressional players and witnesses were described by congressional reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Supreme Court reporter Adam Liptak.



On the front page of Saturday’s New York Times, reporter Catie Edmondson concerned herself with Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who is evidently being dragooned into defending President Trump against impeachment the way he stuck up for Judge Brett Kavanaugh: “Prodded by the Right, Graham Joins the Impeachment Battle.” Judging by her choice of adjectives in these passages, Edmondson has not gotten over Kavanaugh’s success in earning a seat on the Supreme Court.



On Thursday’s Hardball, MSNBC political analyst Michael Steele reminded viewers why there’s no reason to consider him a conservative or Republican. Not only did Steele bash the investigations into the deadly Benghazi terror attack and Operation: Fast and Furious, but he seemed to express disappointment with Congressman Will Hurd (R-TX) for not leaning toward impeachment. 



Adam Schiff’s Democrat impeachment hearings are under way – airing live all over the dial – and the liberals are quite upset that America couldn’t care less. NBC News spurred rage on Twitter for daring to admit (online) that the first two witnesses “lacked the pizzazz necessary to capture public attention.” The Washington Free Beacon posted some hilarious tweets railing against this reality. “I was so moved by their patriotic, factual testimony that I actually cried.”



With the news that the State Department had blocked Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland from testifying to Congress on Tuesday, CNN Newsroom went live to Capitol Hill for reaction. After showing remarks from Oversight Committee Ranking Member Jim Jordan, co-host Jim Sciutto continued the media's new favorite hobby of pretentious fact-checking when he charged Jordan with not telling the truth on Adam Schiff's meeting with the whistleblower, but in the end it was Sciutto who needed the fact-checker.



On Wednesday, Ohio State University released the “Report of the Independent Investigation” of “Sexual Abuse Committed by Dr. Richard Strauss,” who as a longtime athletics doctor abused over 175 male students from 1979 to 1996. The scandal became a national news story last year since Congressman Jim Jordan (R-OH) was an assistant wrestling coach from 1986 to 1994 after a career as a Buckeye student athlete. On Friday, Washington Post congressional reporter Paul Kane claimed that the report proved Jordan and fellow Buckeye officials knew of Strauss's abuses.



Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote an opinion piece for The New York Times on how Google has actually been aiming to protect user privacy. “[P]rivacy is for everyone — not just for the few,” he declared. His critics are not convinced. The same day another Times opinion piece titled “Google Says It Has Found Religion on Privacy” addressed his claims as well as his critics’ concerns. It described the CEO’s speech at an annual developers conference as “cognizant of today’s consumer privacy concerns” yet “out of step with the company’s history of intensive online data collection.”



Soon after former Trump attorney Michael Cohen testified in front of the House Oversight Committee hearing on Wednesday, a panel of commentators on CNN surprised viewers by contradicting the disbarred lawyer’s claim that he never wanted a post in the White House. Cohen’s troubles began when Dana Bash, the chief political correspondent for the liberal channel, pointed out that he was “not the perfect messenger” to attack Trump because of “one potential problem” contradicting CNN’s reports on the matter.



On her 2:00 p.m. ET hour show on Friday, MSNBC anchor Katy Tur seized on a nasty ad put out by the Democrat’s House Majority PAC that – among other things – compared Republican Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan to disgraced Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, who helped cover up child sexual abuse for years. Rather than criticize the outrageous attack, Tur and Politico’s Jake Sherman touted the Democratic strategy to paint the GOP as “crooked” and “corrupt.”



During his decades-long career, Jim Carrey has gone from being a popular comedian and movie star to a rabid liberal who thinks "half the country" is "cheering the locomotive that will kill them. He has diverted his creative energy into the political arena to bash his favorite target: President Donald Trump, as well as other people in the Republican Party.



Early Friday, NewsBusters reported that CNN spent only one minute of airtime on the recanting of a former Ohio State University wrestler’s allegations against Ohio Republican Congressman Jim Jordan. After reviewing coverage of the original NBC article which leveled the claims against Jordan, NewsBusters found that there was a massive discrepancy in reporting.



On Thursday afternoon, the Daily Caller reported that a former Ohio State University wrestler recanted his statement regarding Rep. Jim Jordan. The wrestler, Mark Coleman, originally claimed that Jordan had knowledge of sexual abuse by deceased OSU physician Dr. Richard Strauss. Coleman now says, “at no time did I ever say or have any direct knowledge that Jim Jordan knew of Dr. Richard Strauss’s inappropriate behavior.”