The front of Tuesday’s New York Times featured a long essay by Sarah Lyall on Brexit, “A Mighty City Trembles at a Global Crossroad -- With Britain Leaving Europe, Can London Remain a Capital of the World?” The online headline was stark: “Will London Fall?” The NYT made a big production of it, with big photos over the fold on the front and inside, with Lyall “mourning” the supposed death of the famously “tolerant....open-minded” city. Counter-arguments about national sovereignty and overweening bureaucratic dictates were quickly dismissed as irresponsible right-wing journalistic myths. Lyall's reporting has betrayed a consistent bitterness over Brexit: Before the vote, she had mocked the movement in a front-page story by evoking Monty Python.



Mark Thompson, chief executive of the New York Times, has written a highly padded opinion piece that boils down to one important thing he wants to get across to you rubes: Trump = Hitler. Oh yeah, he includes one very slight caveat so you don't think of him as your usual leftwing loon. The rest of his piece is mostly yawn inducing padding which serves as filler for his basic premise. 

So let us get to Thompson's unintentional humor as he stresses that Trump is like Hitler because, get this, they both spoke off the cuff. I kid you not.



The media exuded panic surrounding the vote for the U.K. to leave the European Union, commonly called Brexit. Reports after the vote panicked over how much markets had fallen, worried about a potential recession for the UK and otherwise attacked the outcome. 



Wednesday’s New York Times was crammed with condescension and hostility toward racist Brexit voters. Rachel Donadio had previously “credited” “a campaign of open xenophobia” for the victory of the Leave choice. On Wednesday she peppered some left-wing British in writing and theatre fields with loaded questions, and they delivered the artists’ predictable low opinions of their fellow citizen-xenophobes who’d had the bad taste to vote for national sovereignty. And two other reporters toured two struggling towns that had voted Leave, and predictably found racism, xenophobia, and economic ignorance.



When liberal newspapers attack less liberal newspapers: Jim Rutenberg’s Mediator column, “Fair Play in a Fact-Challenged Political Landscape,” on the front of the Monday July 4 Business Day, started with a media conflict involving a pro-Donald Trump commentator but pivoted to a denunciation of supposedly misleading journalism on Brexit from conservative newspapers before the vote. (The Times often singles out less liberal media outlets like the New York Post for scorn when events don’t turn out the way the paper wishes.) Then Rutenberg turned for Platonic political truth to...the liberal Politifact.

 



Liberals and their newspapers have a very simplistic formula for analyzing female politicians: you’re either “for women,” or you’re a token of an anti-woman political movement. One of two women will be the next prime minister of Britain, but since they’re in the Conservative Party, who at The Washington Post is happy?

In Saturday’s paper, Post reporter Karla Adam wrote a pejorative article headlined “Women question feminist values of Britain’s next leader.” Adam spends all her time relaying what “some” people (that is, leftists) think is wrong with all this.



What could be better than a new Star Trek movie? Its first openly gay character, of course!

The internet has been exploding with the news that USS Enterprise helmsman Hikaru Sulu will be portrayed as gay in the upcoming film Star Trek Beyond. Sulu will appear briefly in a scene with his “husband.” According to The Hollywood Reporter, “the two have a daughter together.” 



The New York Times’ snobbish, condescending, and just plain crazed hostility toward Britain’s vote to leave the European Union trade zone continued after a political coup resulted in Boris Johnson, the intellectual figurehead of the successful Brexit campaign, dropping out of the race for conservative leader to replace Prime Minister David Cameron. Friday’s front page featured an insulting "memo from London" from reporter Sarah Lyall gleefully digging the dirt and then shoveling it over Boris Johnson's political career:



The new July 11 edition of People magazine set a side a page for "The Man Behind Brexit," Boris Johnson, the "Donald Trump doppelganger." The photo makes Boris look like a boozy bumpkin (or Trumpkin). 
 
According to People writer Simon Perry, his Trumpesque tactic is fear-mongering: "Johnson, 52, shares more than just a hairstyle with America's presumptive Republican nominee. Like Trump he stokes nationalist sentiment and fear of open immigration."


CNN's Christiane Amanpour took her left-leaning, pro-European Union activism to a new level on Tuesday during an interview of pro-Brexit politician Daniel Hannan. Amanpour, who recently blasted the referendum as an example of "xenophobia", tried to implicate Hannan as somehow partially responsible for supposed post-vote "hate crimes."



Maybe it was those college courses on the history of Europe that soured me on the idea of a united continent. How could a conglomeration of nation states noted for invading each other, pillaging and warring against each other form a union? How could a continent with different languages, cultures and money become a united states of Europe modeled after the USA?



Journalists on all three networks on Monday continued to howl with outrage over Britain’s decision to exit the European Union. Reporters on ABC, CBS and NBC attacked the “worst decision” that could lead to “economic disaster.” On the Today show, analyst Jim Cramer assailed, “In terms of the financial chaos and collapse, it’s just one of the worst moves I’ve seen.”