Tuesday’s New York Times featured a humdrum personal profile of its own reporter, Maggie Haberman, whose only point of interest was an offensive comparison the White House reporter made between Michael Bloomberg’s 2001 run for mayor of New York City and Donald Trump’s run for president in 2016. In both cases, “an unprecedented form of terror in an election” resulted in an unlikely result. One was an Islamist terrorist attack that murdered over 3000 people; the other, some embarrassing campaign emails that may have damaged Clinton’s prospects over Trump. Same thing, really, right?


Thursday’s New York Times was haughtily dismissive of the Trump-inspired “2017 Fake News Awards” posted on the RNC’s website Wednesday night: “May We Have the ‘Fake’ Envelope, Please?” The Times itself scored two of the coveted slots. Reporters Michael Grynbaum and Matt Flegenheimer tried to shift the blame to Trump right off the bat, while taking the stunt quite solemnly indeed, seeing a threat to “press freedom” in criticism false reports.


When President Trump announced them in early January, many in the liberal media thought that the Fake News Awards were a bluff and he wouldn’t go through with them. But after having previously been postponed, Trump unveiled the “winners” Wednesday night. Out of the top 10 instances of fake news, CNN was sloppy enough to win four awards with the top spot going to The New York Times. The awards twice noted a Media Research Center study that showed 90 percent of the media’s coverage of him was negative.


Leftists in the media don’t like to be called out for their liberal bias. When that happens, their knee-jerk response is to lash out with petty ad hominem attacks. A perfect example of this reaction came in The New York Times’ Paul Krugman’s January 15 column, “Know-Nothings for the 21st Century.”


In 1999, journalist Eleanor Clift compared House Republicans during the impeachment of Bill Clinton to the Ku Klux Klan. In 2011, sleazy New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, with no facts whatsoever, blamed the Tea Party for the shooting of then-Congresswoman Gabby Giffords. In 1989, journalist Lesley Stahl predicted that, in years to come, historians would be baffled by anyone liking Ronald Reagan. 


New York Times columnist Paul Krugman clowned it up on Tuesday by suggesting that the “pink pussy hats” of the Women’s March in January “should be the symbol of our delivery from evil.” Just put a pussy hat on the Statue of Liberty and call it a day!


After making completely false claims about the GOP tax reform bill on ABC’s Good Morning America earlier on Sunday, Clinton lackey George Stephanopoulos spent most of This Week leading the discussion tearing it down. After spending a couple minutes smearing the bill in his opening monologue, Stephanopoulos interviewed Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn where one of his first questions involved allegations GOP leaders bought off Tennessee Senator Bob Corker with a real estate provision:


Media Research Center President Brent Bozell on Wednesday mocked New York Times columnist Paul Krugman as “constantly wrong” and a “left-wing radical.” Varney and Co. host Stuart Varney pointed out just how off Krugman’s prediction of the stock market was for the Trump era. 


The New York Times classless columnist Paul Krugman eagerly swallowed the mainstream media distortion of comments conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh made on his program as Hurricane Irma approached to snidely dismiss him as a “terrible person” in “Conspiracies, Corruption And Climate” on Monday. Krugman extended his assault to conservatives and Republicans in general as demonstrated by the column’s text box: “It’s not just Rush: know-nothings are running America.”


Immigration is the issue where the New York Times’ liberal lean is most obvious, a truth underlined in Friday’s edition, showing the paper still grieving over President Trump’s decision to eliminate the unilateral, constitutionally dubious Obama administration diktat, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which temporarily protected from deportation illegals who came to the United States as children. 


For the most part, people share common goals. Most of us want poor people to enjoy higher standards of living, greater traffic safety, more world peace, greater racial harmony, cleaner air and water, and less crime. Despite the fact that people have common goals, we often see them grouped into contentious factions, fighting tooth and nail to promote polar opposite government policies in the name of achieving a commonly held goal.


It's clear that Paul Krugman at the New York Times could hardly wait to submit his latest column, a Monday polemic which predictably celebrated Republicans' recent failure to roll back ObamaCare. Krugman ventured even further into the realm of fantasy than usual when he conferred nearly angelic status on former President Barack Obama and his administration. His claim: "The Obama administration was remarkably clearheaded and honest about its policies" — particularly in regards to ObamaCare.