New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has given up on helping rural whites, judging from his Tuesday column, “Getting Real About Rural America.” The text box: “Nobody knows how to reverse the heartland’s decline.” To strengthen his attack on rural Americans, Krugman hints that social welfare programs often do no good, an interesting perspective from a liberal economist. He shed crocodile tears for rural America, while passive-aggressively sticking the knife in: "Even then, rural areas and small towns weren’t the 'real America,' somehow morally superior to the rest of us."



Rush Limbaugh’s December 2018 Limbaugh Letter has an article titled “Demonizing White Men.” It highlights -- with actual quotations from people in the media, academia and the political and entertainment arenas -- the attack on white men as a class. You can decide whether these statements are decent, moral or even sensible. Should we support their visions? Don Lemon, a CNN anchorman, said, “We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them.”



When the annual World Economic Forum opened in Davos, Switzerland, on Tuesday, one of the speakers was U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who declared that “a system that allows billionaires to exist“ is “wrong.” That claim drew a fiery response from Maria Bartiromo, who dismissed the socialist’s proposal to increase the tax rate on wealthy people to 70 percent, a concept the Fox Business Network anchor called “quite naive.”



The Green New Deal concept is the latest rage among progressives and the media that love them. In this case, that would include The Washington Post and New York Times. The Post’s promotions included bringing up the “smart” and “enormously popular” Green New Deal in at least 21 news or opinion pieces in just a month between Dec. 16, and Jan. 15. The Post touted a survey claiming a Green New Deal was “supposedly supported by most American voters.” Even though it’s doubtful anyone could explain what the deal really means.



If there’s one thing liberal media love, it’s the idea of raising taxes on the rich. It’s something they have in common with freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. As a self-identifying Democratic-Socialist, Ocasio-Cortez has plenty of expensive ideas for the government, including a Green New Deal she suggested paying for with much higher taxes on the wealthiest.



New York Times columnist Paul Krugman was at his old “authoritarian” tricks again in “Conservatism’s Monstrous Endgame." The text box: “Apparatchiks are corroding the foundations of democracy.” Democracy has been dying quite a while in Krugland. Of the judge who declared the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, he wrote, "...it’s about assaulting democracy in general. And the current state of the endgame is probably just the beginning; the worst, I fear, is yet to come."



In his most recent column this week for The New York Times, Paul Krugman claimed that the Republican Party is going “full authoritarian” by trying to transform America into a one-party state where elections are rigged and the media is controlled by the government. As a corollary to this column, Krugman tweeted that the United States is now part of a “new axis of evil” together with Russia and Saudi Arabia.



Paul Krugman embarrassed himself on several fronts in his Tuesday New York Times column, jumping on the latest liberal outrage bandwagon over the awarding of a Presidential Medal of Freedom to Miriam Adelson. But Krugman truly stepped in his own hypocrisy when he tried to elevate a late Republican solely to bash Trump: "A genuine hero like John McCain, who was critical of Trump, gets dismissed as a failure." Is that the same "hero" who Krugman called "awful" just last year?



Paul Krugman’s Friday New York Times column, “Real America Versus Senate America,” is another dose of Blue State urban smugness from Krugman. He becomes the latest liberal who, while accusing Trump of violating all political norms, turns around and advocates tossing aside traditional political structures like the Electoral College, the Supreme Court, and now the Senate when they interfere with Democrats obtaining power. Krugman also asks, :how do we explain those Senate losses?" without mentioning Brett Kavanaugh.



Respected liberal economist turned partisan Democratic columnist Paul Krugman is at his absolute worst during times of national tragedy, from 9-11 to the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, events he invariably tries to exploit for partisan gain. The pattern held after the anti-Semitic massacre at a synagogue in Pittsburgh. He was in typical form in Tuesday’s New York Times, “Hate Is on the Ballot Next Week. Don’t Pretend Otherwise." The text box had a dire warning for those daring to suggest Democrats have contributed to the aura of political violence: “Whataboutism is the last refuge of scoundrels. For cowards, it’s bothsidesism.”



It’s evidently going to take some time for the post-Kavanaugh confirmation healing to begin at the New York Times. With near unanimity the paper’s columnists, some of them former reporters, are reacting with anger and contempt over Trump’s victory against the Democrat’s Supreme Court smear campaign. Columnist Paul Krugman  rehashed his tired old line about “The Paranoid Style in G.O.P. Politics.” The text box read “Republicans are an authoritarian regime in waiting.” Not to be outflanked, columnist Michelle Goldberg claimed “Trump Gives Dictators the Green Light.”



As the last-minute accusation against Brett Kavanaugh was breaking, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman fired off a self-righteous mini-tweetstorm that showed an unusual absence of self-unawareness, even for a GOP-hater not lacking in conceit. The three tweets form a representative triptych of Krugman’s attack-dog persona, with equal parts attacks on his colleagues in the media and dire warnings for any on his Democratic side who might feign fairness and objectivity, which Krugman sees as a cowardly façade. Those two facets were sandwiched by the tweet showing his shocking lack of self-awareness: Calling a conservative "a smarmy, smirking, entitled and mercenary guy."