In what was a bit of a shock for what’s considered a sober PBS interview program, comedian and film director Judd Apatow substitute-hosted the Charlie Rose show on Monday night. And the director of movies like SuperBad and Knocked Up wasted little time in insulting Donald Trump as he declared: “I feel like he runs the country like he ran The Apprentice....And it’s a little scary isn’t it?” 



You know The Washington Post is a liberal newspaper when the big splashy figure on the front of Friday’s Style section is…Keith Olbermann. The man whose career has now “evolved” into ranting in obscurity for a fashion magazine? Yes.

Political reporter Ben Terris is clearly not thrilled with this assignment. He will clearly wound Keith’s massive ego by proclaiming late in the piece “Some of Olbermann’s commentaries are infused with a frenetic energy akin to the right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.”



The news media reward Donald Trump with a “honeymoon” as unfriendly as their campaign coverage, with journalists blasting the President-elect as a “racist,” “authoritarian” and a “demagogue,” while some cast his election as “tainted” and potentially “illegitimate” because of Russia’s hacking.



All this week, NewsBusters is recounting the most obnoxious liberal bias of 2016. Yesterday, we presented the most outrageous examples of journalists fawning over liberal or left-wing icons; today’s installment showcases some of this year’s most rancid quotes attacking Republicans or conservatives. Most of the media’s ire this year was aimed at GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump — who, according to some in the media, is either an American version of Hitler, “clinically insane,” or a “raving meth head” — but conservative Senator Ted Cruz and the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia were also targeted.



Monday’s NBC Nightly News led off with anchor Lester Holt decrying the “dark consequences” of Donald Trump’s “fiery and unsupported” warnings of a “rigged” election next month, and on Tuesday morning, MSNBC anchor Craig Melvin labeled Trump’s concerns “dangerous.” But back in 2004, NBC’s cable network MSNBC was the leader in casting doubt on the legitimacy of an election outcome, as then-8pm host Keith Olbermann spent night after night venting loopy left-wing fantasies about how President George W. Bush had supposedly stolen the election from John Kerry.



In a Wednesday piece, GQ writer Drew Magary told Trump supporters, "If you vote for him, you’re not making America great again. You are killing it. You are telling the world that America isn’t worth it. You are telling the world that all of our big talk about freedom and unity and ideals is just a load of shit, and that you would prefer a smoldering dystopia where freedom is just a flimsy cover for evildoing, led by a man who believes that strength is measured only in killing people."



A current MSNBC personality just passed the half-decade mark as a host on the channel. A former MSNBC personality who’s made plenty of comebacks just made another one. The Washington Monthly’s D.R. Tucker praised each man to the skies this past weekend. Tucker called Chris Hayes "the classiest man on cable” and opined that from the get-go, he was brilliant, “an engaging, charismatic host whose mind moved faster than Usain Bolt’s legs." As for Keith Olbermann, now of GQ, Tucker gushed that Olby "recognizes that conservatism…is a metastasizing cancer within the American body, and that if that cancer is left untreated, the American body will be consigned to hospice care."



In the course of presenting what is apparently one story in a series of several on a "Divided America," David Bauder at the Associated Press portrayed two Americans with largely different news consumption habits. Though the theme of Bauder's Thursday morning report was about how Americans are "retreat(ing) into tribes of like-minded people who get news filtered through particular world views," the two people he presented "don't rely exclusively on partisan media," and go elsewhere "to hear opposing viewpoints." This essentially contradicted his attempted primary point, which is that Americans are supposedly, as his story's headline reads, "Constructing our own intellectual ghettos."



In a Sunday post, The Washington Monthly’s D.R. Tucker urged Bern-feelers to follow the example of conservatives who “rebounded from Barry Goldwater’s spectacular [1964] loss [and became] a dominant force. By forming influential think tanks and media outlets, pressuring the mainstream press to focus on issues right-wingers considered important, and voting consistently in even the most ‘minor’ of elections, the right seized power…Barry Goldwater was not the man to lead a conservative revolution, but he unquestionably inspired one. Perhaps [Sanders’s] supporters could pick up where his campaign left off and lead a revolutionary effort to move this country to the left.”



Megyn Kelly as an unofficial campaign surrogate for Donald Trump? That’s how Washington Monthly blogger D.R. Tucker cast her when he posited that this year’s presidential contest boils down to “a fight between Rachel Maddow’s America and Megyn Kelly’s America.”

“The presumptive Democratic and Republican presidential candidates embody the distinctive traits of” Maddow and Kelly, contended Tucker in a Sunday post. “Hillary Clinton has all of Maddow’s wisdom, chapter-and-verse policy knowledge, and courage,” whereas “Donald Trump is the male Kelly, someone who has become famous as a result of irresponsible and undeserved media hype, someone who has been able to fool millions into believing he has substance.”



In the April 4 edition of Notable Quotables the liberal media: Barack Obama’s trip to Cuba inspires journalists to sing communism’s praises and worry about capitalism ruining that country’s “charm.” Meanwhile, anchors at PBS and CBS slam Ted Cruz for his “ugly” anti-terrorism policies and a former New York Times editor decries sexist persecution of “fundamentally honest” Hillary Clinton. 



Far-left host Keith Olbermann appeared on The View, Friday, to warn that while the threat of a nuclear ISIS is “theoretical,” the danger of Donald Trump becoming President is a “distinct” possibility. Olbermann wondered aloud, “Somebody said the other day...'What would happen if ISIS got nukes?.... So, I said, ‘what would happen if Donald Trump got nukes?’"