Thursday evening, Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted that CNN Chairman Jeff Zucker had criticized Fox News as “state-run TV” and a “pure propaganda machine” that “does an incredible disservice to this country” at a media conference earlier in the day sponsored by the Financial Times. Fox's Tucker Carlson also went after Zucker Thursday evening, reminding viewers that CNN is literally state-run TV in certain countries.



Donald Trump’s repeated branding of CNN as “fake news” may have been born in its biased 2016 campaign coverage, but the truth is CNN has peddled inaccurate reporting with an agenda for at least three decades. From former CNN correspondent Peter Arnett, in 1991, passing along Iraqi war propaganda of allied forces bombing a “baby milk” factory to CNN executive Eason Jordan, in 2005, accusing U.S. soldiers of targeting journalists to CNN contributor Donna Brazile feeding townhall questions to the 2016 Hillary Clinton campaign, there is a long history of news fakery at the oldest 24-hour cable news outlet.



Speaking of the hysterical outrage machine being turned up to a 10 after Donald Trump’s birtherism statement Friday morning, the pathetic behavior by the media continued into the afternoon as CNN host Ashleigh Banfield and media reporter Dylan Byers worried that Donald Trump and his supporters could undermine the media to the point that the country would look like Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. 



Sunday evening, Noah Pollak at the Weekly Standard noted that "Something important is missing from the New York Times's coverage of the war in Gaza: photographs of terrorist attacks on Israel, and pictures of Hamas fighters, tunnels, weaponry, and use of human shields."

That's because Hamas has demanded that such photographs not be circulated. The Times is clearly complying, and without telling its readers that is coverage has been restricted. Pollak believes that the Times really doesn't mind the overt censorship (links are in original; bolds are mine throughout this post):



A former top CNN executive who accused U.S. troops in Iraq of attempting to murder reporters will produce a Republican debate to be hosted by Donald Trump. As Michelle Malkin noted, a press release touted the "prestigious" and "top notch" job Eason Jordan will do.

The debate is being sponsored by the Ion network and  the conservative Newsmax magazine. In November of 2004, Jordon said this about the American military: "Actions speak louder than words. The reality is that at least 10 journalists have been killed by the US military, and according to reports I believe to be true journalists have been arrested and tortured by U.S. forces." These egregious comments resulted in him resigning in February of '05.