The press is simplistically treating South Carolina Congressman Mark Sanford's Tuesday Republican primary loss as exemplifying the price one pays if one doesn't learn, per the Associated Press, "not to cross (President Donald) Trump." A closer look at Sanford's history illustrates that this is a classic case of sudden media respect which ignores why Sanford was so vulnerable.



More strange new respect for religion -- or at least religious figures who advocate left-wing issues – in Sunday’s New York Times. Elisabetta Povoledo reported from Rome on Pope Francis’s “climate change” crusade and his lecture of corporations in “Pope Urges Oil Executives to Act on Climate: ‘There Is No Time to Lose.’” (Christian conservative opponents of gay marriage and abortion still reliably get hostile coverage.) Povoledo leveraged the Pope’s moral authority to push warming as a “global crisis.”



Former President Bill Clinton’s sex scandal with Monica Lewinsky was back in the news on Monday after he lashed out during an interview with NBC News’ Craig Melvin to promote the thriller novel he co-authored with James Patterson. And surprisingly, some members of the liberal media were critical of his attitude towards both Lewinski and Melvin, as was the case during CNN Tonight where host Don Lemon and his panel took the Democrat to task.



The New York Times featured a university student in France who has become a liberal hero by embracing a tenet of fundamentalist Islam in the form of a headscarf. It’s jarring to read a Times article so gung-ho in support of a sign of religious fundamentalism, and which criticizes the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo without mentioning the massacre of 12 of its employees by radical Islamists in 2015. The Times betrays a double standard when it comes to Islamic fundamentalism compared to that of other religions.



During a discussion on Tuesday’s edition of CNN’s New Day about whether the Trump administration should publicly apologize for the comment made by White House aide Kelly Sadler that Senator John McCain is dying of cancer, a clash arose between faux Republican and CNN political commentator Ana Navarro and Women Vote Trump co-chair Amy Kremer.



The front of Sunday’s New York Times featured political reporter Jonathan Martin’s tribute to the ailing Sen. John McCain: “At Home, McCain Shares Memories and Regrets.” It has some charming moments, but comes off hypocritical, given the paper’s back and forth feelings for McCain, praising him when he was a threat to more conservative Republicans during the 2008 party primaries, condemning him when he threatened the saintly Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential election campaign. It also used the veteran moderate Republican as a convenient, pointed rebuttal to President Trump.



Stirring the political controversy in the Vatican, New York Times Rome bureau chief Jason Horowitz once again gleefully pitted Pope Francis against “ultraconservative” Catholics in Tuesday’s “Pope Puts Caring for Migrants and Opposing Abortion on Equal Footing.” Horowitz used the Pope's newest apostolic exhortation to sharpen the conflict, crediting Francis with "citing vicious examples of defamation in some Catholic outlets" by Church conservatives.



Donald Trump is not the first President to have been accused of sexual improprieties. When President Bill Clinton faced allegations of sexual harassment from Paula Jones and even a rape charge from Juanita Broaddrick, the media looked for reasons not to cover those charges.



On Wednesday, Morning Joe host Mika Brzezinski was repeatedly struck speechless with adoration during an interview with former CIA Director John Brennan. Brennan had scored points with Brzezinski and her compatriots in the past with his verbose tweets attacking the President, some of which Brzezinski had displayed on screen for viewers to appreciate during the interview. Upon encountering Brennan in person, her fondness turned to reverence as he consistently told her everything she wanted to hear.



As the deadline approached for the Attorney General to decide whether to fire former Acting Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe, the media have ramped up the hysterics. On Friday, the hosts of MSNBC's Morning Joe lost their tempers and bashed White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders for "not being a good American" when she described McCabe as a "bad actor."



CNN reporter Bill Weir appeared on New Day Thursday morning, ahead of the premiere of the network's documentary series, Pope: The Most Powerful Man in History. Weir had just compiled a report focusing on Pope Francis and Syrian refugees and, along with co-hosts Alisyn Camerota and Chris Cuomo, seemed to agree that the seriesprovided the perfect platform to advocate for open borders.



A year after ridiculing President Trump for talking about it, the New York Times acknowledges that Sweden has a crime problem, and suggests very indirectly that it may have something to do with its loose immigration policy – just as the president insisted. In “Grenades and Gang Violence Rattle Sweden,” Ellen Barry and Christina Anderson used the incident of a man killed by a hand grenade in Stockholm to talk about the disturbing crime trend in Sweden, and hinted gently about a possible cause: Immigration.