Despite how they were dismissive of his truthfulness prior to Wednesday and the fact that he could not directly implicate President Trump in a quid pro quo scheme with Ukraine, ABC, CBS, and NBC heralded the public testimony of E.U. Ambassador Gordon Sondland as a “bombshell” from “the most pivotal witness yet.”



The liberal media is not known for its deep and abiding respect for the US military. Yet in the opening segment alone of today's Morning Joe, there were no fewer than nine instances of members of the panel referring to Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman as a "hero" or Purple Heart recipient. For good measure, Mike Barnicle melodramatically described him as "wearing the cloth of our country." What accounts for such a sudden onset of hero worship? The answer's obvious: since the Democrats and MSM see Vindman as a key impeachment witness against President Trump, it suits their political purposes to celebrate his status, lending credence to his testimony. 



New York Times impeachment coverage continued with the paper casting as heroic the testimony of Maria Yovanovitch under a predictably treacly banner headline over Saturday’s front page: “Ex-Envoy ‘Devastated’ As Trump Vilified Her.”  Sheera Frenkel was strangely unconcerned that powerful social media companies were squelching speech online by trying to memory-hole a name being bandied about online as the possible identity of the White House “whistleblower”  -- Eric Ciaramella.



Apple TV+'s flagship series, The Morning Show, was inspired by a book by CNN's Brian Stelter and it shows. Clearly meant to be prestige television in the mold of HBO, the series is more preachy, self-indulgent Newsroom than juicy, story-driven Big Little Lies. The first three episodes of a 10 episode season were released with the premiere of Apple TV+ on November 1.



The New York Times has abruptly changed its tune on the “Deep State,” a name given to the entrenched bureaucracy supposedly determined to work via secret machinations and selective media leaks to bring down the Trump administration from within. As Trump and his Republican allies railed against the “Deep State,” the Times typically mocked the very idea as a phony conspiracy theory. The headline under a March 2017 analysis: "What Happens When You Fight a ‘Deep State’ That Doesn’t Exist.” But the Times has changed its tune in startling fashion. Now the Deep State is real, and it’s just wonderful.



New York Times reporter Jennifer Steinhauer’s profile of Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, and how his military career has bolstered his political one, made Thursday’s front page. “A View Outside the Wire Lifts Buttigieg Onstage.” Reading Steinhauer’s loving profile of the South Bend, Indiana mayor is instructive in how easily the liberal press sheds its cynicism toward military heroes in politics when they happen to be Democrats. It also shows how differently she treats Republican presidential candidates.



When John Bolton first became President Trump’s national security advisor back in March of last year, the liberal broadcast networks were sounding their alarms to warn viewers of his “hardline” and “controversial” positions. But on Tuesday, they clung to reports that Bolton described Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani as a “hand grenade” running something like a “drug deal” in Ukraine.



Today's Morning Joe offered up another example of what we call "Sudden Respect," the phenomenon in which a person formerly despised by the liberal media suddenly earns its respect by doing something to liberal liking. Joe Scarborough has been a fierce critic of John Bolton. But suddenly this morning, Scarborough overflowed with praise for Bolton, repeatedly referring to Bolton as a "patriot." So what did Bolton do to turn Scarborough's scorn into such fawning admiration? Reports that Bolton branded the Trump administration's Ukraine policy a "drug deal."



Joy Reid plays the clip of President Nixon, facing impeachment, announcing his resignation. Former Watergate prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks praises Nixon and condemns President Trump, saying, "[Nixon] actually understood what government is and he actually acted in the benefit of the country by resigning. I don’t think that Donald Trump has even the slightest shred of humility or understanding. I don’t think there's any chance that he would ever admit and resign in the interests of the American people."



New York Times “climate reporter” Hiroko Tabuchi went to war against “secretive” conservative free-market groups that are fighting counter-productive regulations in Wednesday’s edition: “Warriors Against Environmental Rules Champion the Dishwasher.” Tabuchi found herself in the strange position of embracing corporate public-relations-speak from dishwasher manufacturers, in the cause of defending regulations.



More strange new respect for religion in Monday’s New York Times, for “America’s First Gun Violence Minister.” What sounds like an idea for a satirical Babylon Bee story is in fact a prominently placed interview in the lead National section of the paper of record: Reporter Adeel Hassan, whose work “focuses on identity and discrimination,” reporting from Texas for “A Ministry Pushing Beyond ‘Thoughts and Prayers.’”



When the New York Times’ hostility to police collides with the unyielding demands of solidarity and multiculturism, we get upside-down reporting like the kind that appeared in Saturday’s New York Times, when reporters Matt Furber and Mitch Smith question the harsh sentencing of a former police officer, Somali-American Mohammed Noor, found guilty in a woman’s death: “Over 12 Years in Prison for Minneapolis Officer in Woman’s Death.” Substitute “seen by some” with “seen by Times journalists” in the weasel-worded text box: “Far from building trust in the system, a case came to be seen by some as a sign of a double standard.”