Joe Scarborough of MSNBC’s Morning Joe distorted an Axios report on President Donald Trump’s economy to credit former president Barack Obama. The show ran a segment defending Obama’s tweet congratulating himself for today’s booming economy. 



Former President Barack Obama, touting his own economic magic wand, tried to take credit for the Trump economy. Obama sent out the self-congratulatory tweet February 17. He said that, “Eleven years ago today, near the bottom of the worst recession in generations, I signed the Recovery Act, paving the way for more than a decade of economic growth and the longest streak of job creation in American history.”



Good news is always welcome, especially when our own pockets are concerned. However, a recent Telemundo report about remittances from the United States to Mexico went overboard in plugging a Spanish bank with a subsidiary in Mexico. 



Yes, it´s true. People over 55 years of age are prospering across the nation. But so are Latinos - and as one Hispanic investment ace tells us, they are not the only ones, much to the chagrin of the liberal Spanish-speaking media that continue to make a case for an ailing economy about to crash and for Donald Trump to be deep-sixed.



Reacting to yesterday's short-lived meeting with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, the Morning Joe panel hurls a string of insults at President Trump: "stinks, complete idiot, pathetic."



Despite the first half or so of CNN’s The 2000s episode on the 2008 election and the early Obama years being largely pain-free on the bias front, the liberal media’s overwhelming love for Barack Obama burst through when it hit Election Day 2008 and the two years afterward. In all, CNN swooned over the Obama election with zero objectivity, portrayed Obama as trying to be bipartisan, and subtly painted Tea Partiers as angry, irrational conspiracy theorists who ran around with signs depicting the President as the Joker or a Nazi.



Several recent polls, plus the popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders, demonstrate that young people prefer socialism to free market capitalism. That, I believe, is a result of their ignorance and indoctrination during their school years, from kindergarten through college. For the most part, neither they nor many of their teachers and professors know what free market capitalism is.



The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 26,000 for the first time on Wednesday. When it first jumped the 26,000 hurdle during Tuesday's trading, only to fall back at the close, CNN's Christine Romans somewhat surprisingly noted it. But as she did, she positively and erroneously spun the market's awful pre-presidential election history in a way that even some conservatives have ignorantly come to accept.



On Tuesday, Julia Seymour at NewsBusters reported that the Friday evening news shows on all three networks spent a few seconds noting the government's somewhat disappointing but hardly alarming job-creation number for December (148,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs) reported earlier that day. Seymour observed that "Those same news programs (have) often underreported good economic news in the past year." Consistent with that pattern of selectivity, the three networks failed to note that Friday's job release reported the lowest black unemployment rate on record.



Business and technology magazine Fast Company may have pulled a fast one over any readers unwilling to whip out a calculator when thinking about the Universal Basic Income (UBI).

A universal basic income is when a government provides a certain amount of money unconditionally, to all individuals regardless of employment status or income level.



On Friday, the government reported that the economy added a seasonally adjusted 211,000 jobs, and that the unemployment rate dropped to a 10-year low of 4.4 percent. The day's press coverage had three noticeable highlights. The first was the headline at the Associated Press's coverage — "US JOBS DATA SHOW SOME SCARS FROM RECESSION FINALLY HEALING."



There are predictable signs that after eight years of giving the problem inadequate attention and occasional ridicule, the business press has decided that federal budget deficits and the national debt are going to start to matter again. Gosh, I wonder why? The Associated Press's Christopher Rugaber was relatively subtle about it in a report on Uncle Sam's December and year-to-date budget deficits on Thursday. As would be expected, Paul Krugman wasn't subtle at all in his latest New York Times column.