Near the end of Friday's New Day on CNN, the show devoted three minutes to a piece by Bill Weir in which the CNN correspondent hyped a one-person weekly protest by a teenage global warming activist in New York outside the United Nations headquarters.



On Tuesday's MSNBC Live, host Ali Velshi delivered the latest gem of an example of a self-anointed fact-checker trying to prove a conservative to be wrong about something only to get it substantially more wrong in his alleged correction. Responding to former Greenpeace president turned right-leaning analyst Patrick Moore attacking the Green New Deal plan, Velshi misleadingly gave the impression that carbon dioxide is not a critical component for biological life on Earth.



Friday night, Last Man Standing aired a new episode titled “Arrest Her Development.” The episode focused, in part, on Mike’s (Tim Allen) liberal son in law, Ryan (Jordan Masterson); however, tonight he wasn’t so liberal. To Mike’s surprise, Ryan was going about his marijuana business in a capitalist way.



On Monday's NBC Nightly News, the show devoted a full report to a group of five women -- all Democrats -- who were recently elected to the Colorado state senate at the same time, helping to hand their party control of the legislative chamber away from Republicans.



New York Times Berlin bureau chief Katrin Bennhold, a native of Germany, doesn’t seem in tune with her home country, calling the idea of putting a speed limit on the autobahn a “no-brainer,” one tragically scuttled by the “far right,” and maybe, somehow, Hitler. “Speed Limit? Germans Voting With Lead Feet,” on the front page of Monday’s New York Times. Adolf Hitler makes a cameo.



The New York Times Thursday ran a long investigative piece by climate reporter Hiroko Tabuchi, “E.P.A. Retreat Leaves Wound In Small Town.” The online headline made it political: “A Trump County Confronts the Administration Amid a Rash of Child Cancers.” It’s the old “cancer cluster” concept that alarmist reporters use to push business regulations or in this case protect regulations from repeal, with the Times trying to imply a link that isn’t proven or even substantiated, even by the scientists quoted,, while keeping the Trump administration (which had nothing to with the underlying pollution) front and center and suggesting hypocrisy by Trump supporters.



Among the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's responsibilities are approval and regulation of pharmaceutical drugs. In short, its responsibility is to ensure the safety and effectiveness of drugs. In the performance of this task, FDA officials can make two types of errors — statistically known as the type I error and type II error. With respect to the FDA, a type I error is the rejection or delayed approval of a drug that is safe and effective — erring on the side of over-caution -- and a type II error is the approval of a drug that has unanticipated dangerous side effects, or erring on the side of under-caution.



Appearing on Saturday's CNN Newsroom and again on New Day Sunday to discuss the international summit on global warming, CNN correspondent Nick Paton Walsh repeatedly fearmongered about the possibility of "catastrophe" in a decade if "drastic" changes are not taken to combat global warming.



On Sunday evening, CNN Newsroom ran a full report in which correspondent Drew Griffin bemoaned EPA acting head Andrew Wheeler's efforts to cut regulations, as well his past ties to the coal industry and his work for Republican Senator James Inhofe, whom Griffin derided as a "climate change denier."



Appearing as a guest on Saturday's Today show on NBC to discuss the passing of former President George H.W. Bush, MSNBC contributor and historian Jon Meacham made a point of praising the former President for going left on some issues like taxes in defiance of the Republican party's conservative base. Correspondent Andrea Mitchell also saw raising taxes as a bright spot on Bush's presidency and talked up the notion that it improved the economy.



On Monday morning, several shows on CNN and MSNBC picked up on a United Nations report alleging that the world only has about 10 years to reduce carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere to stave off "dire" and "catastrophic" consequences of global warming.



On Saturday evening, the NBC Nightly News devoted a full report to hyping a group of teenage environmental activists who are suing the United States government to demand that the courts impose regulations to combat global warming.