At the New York Times on Saturday (Sunday's print edition), reporter Robert Pear seemed unhappy that the Trump administration is reining in an extra-legal tool used by the government's regulatory leviathan. Reading his article's headline — "Administration Imposes Sweeping Limits on Federal Actions Against Companies" — one would think that companies can now run rampant without fear of federal legal repercussions. That's nonsense.


Some people have called for a balanced budget amendment to our Constitution as a means of reining in a big-spending Congress. That's a misguided vision, for the simple reason that in any real economic sense, as opposed to an accounting sense, the federal budget is always balanced. The value of what we produced in 2017 -- our gross domestic product -- totaled about $19 trillion.


With Tuesday’s State of the Union well-received by the public (and not the liberal media), it was time to move on and back to spreading fake news, attacking Christians, and hurling around tired insults. Luckily for the Resistance, Wednesday’s Hardball accomplished just that thanks to four cringe-worthy moments featuring host Chris Matthews and a team of liberal guests and journalists.


Once upon a time, Telemundo sought to answer a need in the marketplace by taking a "Just the News" approach, to critical and ratings acclaim. But it appears that the network is eschewing that approach in favor of more one-sided coverage, especially when it comes to immigration.

 


Dedicated tax-and-spend liberals often get help from the press in describing their plans to raid constituents' pocketbooks in vague terms, while nobly describing the alleged benefits of their plans to use the money. Washington's Democratic Governor Jay Inslee has the Associated Press running that kind of interference for his carbon tax.


On Friday morning, CNN anchors were freaking out as President Donald Trump used the occasion of record-low temperatures on the East Coast to take a jab at global warming theory. On CNN's Early Start program, co-host Dave Briggs repeatedly called Trump's tweet "bizarre," and CNN's New Day also dealt with the story in the first half hour of the show.


On Thursday, MSNBC's Ali Velshi interviewed former FCC commissioner Robert McDowell about that agency's move to eliminate the Obama administration's "Open Internet Order," better known as its "net neutrality" regulations. Velshi was in over his head, and as people who find themselves in such a situation often do, he resorted to hostility, bluster, and an accusation of condescension to try to make up for his repeated attempts to make a tired little-guy-versus-big-guy argument against the FCC's action.


Appearing as a guest on Friday's The Beat with Ari Melber, Huffington Post global editorial director Howard Fineman -- also an MSNBC contributor -- went negative on Republicans planning to cut taxes as he described them as "getting drunk on egg nog," and claimed that cutting taxes "periodically gets them into trouble." He went on to suggest that the internet deregulation plan would amount to "an all-out war on" the middle class voters who elected Donald Trump.

 


USA Today reporter Paul Davidson apparently doesn't understand that policies which help workers get hired and keep their jobs are more "worker-friendly" than those designed to line trial lawyers' pockets and help labor unions coerce companies into dealing with them. At least twice this year, Davidson, in his headlines and his content, has characterized moves by the federal government's National Labor Relations Board which have restored predictable economic order as "overturning" Obama-era regulations which were supposedly "worker-friendly," but really weren't.


On Tuesday, all three network morning shows touted the “immediate backlash” against President Trump’s decision to reduce the size of two national monuments in Utah. Little, if any, attention was paid to supporters of the decision, but liberal opponents threatening legal action got all the headlines.


One of the most challenging and important jobs for an economics professor is to teach students how little we know and can possibly know. My longtime friend and colleague Dr. Thomas Sowell says, "It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance." Nobel laureate Friedrich August von Hayek admonished, "The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design."


The most recent cover of Time Magazine — or I should say what's left of it, given its parent company's recent decision "reducing ... circulation and frequency" of the formerly iconic publication — calls President Donald Trump's cabinet "The Wrecking Crew" on a mission of "dismantling government as we know it." Separate reports singled out EPA Director Scott Pruitt, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, and HUD Secretary Ben Carson for scrutiny.