On Friday's Amanpour and Company show on PBS, host Christiane Amanpour joined guest Ta-Nehisi Coates in linking the legacy of slavery in America to illegal immigrant children being held in cage-like detention centers as Coates promoted his new book, The Water Dancer. Amanpour even commented that it was "hard" to hear her guest say the words "kids in cages," even though these detention centers were built by the Barack Obama administration and designed that way to make it easier for Border Patrol agents to watch out for the wellbeing of detainees as they are held typically for a short period (less than 72 hours) after apprehension until they can be transferred to longer-term facilities.



Tom Brady's six Super Bowl titles are not the reason for his popularity, says a University of Rhode Island associate professor. His popularity is really due to white rage and white supremacy, says English Professor Kyle Kusz in a badly over-reaching chapter in a new book published by Macmillan. Matthew Impelli reports the story in Newsweek.



On Monday, Washington Post sports writer Kevin Blackistone declared that public protests and lawsuits are winning the war on words against the continued use of Native American nicknames and mascots. But it depends on what the meaning of "winning" is: Polling by his own newspaper says that opponents of Redskins, Indians and other such nicknames are losing badly in the court of Native American opinion.



All Rise just aired its pilot episode on CBS Monday night and the new legal drama is chock full of wokeness.



Liberal producer Chuck Lorre’s sitcom Bob Hearts Abishola might be new, but its ending certainly was not. Monday night’s pilot episode for the new CBS show about a Nigerian immigrant nurse (Abishola, played by Folake Olowofoyeku) and her white patient (Bob, played by Billy Gardell), ended with a signature Lorre vanity card that was a clear shot at President Trump and his campaign’s red MAGA hats. The card simply showed an image of a yellow IMAG (Immigrants Make America Great) hat, the same one Lorre wore to promote his new show in August.



The New York Times unleashed a farrago of fear-mongering opinions over the weekend, targeting the Republican Party as dirty, dangerously dogmatic, and downright evil. Columnist Farhad Manjoo produced another example of his recent free-floating fear of the Republican Party in his thought experiment: “Tucker Carlson 2024.” The text box: “I imagined a president worse than Trump. Welcome to my nightmare.” The graphic showed host the popular Fox News host Carlson as a wounded cyborg with his metal frame showing from under his skin camouflage. Contributor Annalee Newitz profiled notorious moralist Anthony Comstock  to compare him to modern-day social conservatives.



Shane Gillis’ immediate firing from Saturday Night Live over one year-old insensitive Chinese jokes has generated serious discussion about how our society should deal with being offended by entertainers and other members of the media. Granted there’s a whole swarm people putting out credible arguments about how Shane was offensive, but fellow comedians see his decisive termination as a symptom of something worse: a culture that seeks to destroy what it disagrees with, which signals trouble for comedy, and ultimately free speech at large.



Comedian Chelsea Handler loves being browbeaten about her white privilege by woke millennial college students, apparently. On The View Wednesday, she admitted that in her new Netflix documentary about white privilege, she visited a liberal college campus where black students “took her to task” her about her own privilege. Handler said she even took sexual harassment and racial sensitivity classes, which “everyone” should be taking, she said.



On Tuesday's New Day show, as John Avlon recited a piece on the history of Presidents facing opponents within their own party, the CNN political analyst took a gratuitous cheap shot at Pat Buchanan's 1992 Republican convention speech by vaguely likening him to Adolf Hitler. The crack had nothing to do with the overall point of the segment.



Former SNL comedian Norm MacDonald knows a thing or two about being fired by NBC’s sketch comedy show for some controversial comedy. It’s why the legendary stand-up comic has offered support for recently-hired-then-fired comedian Shane Gillis, the young man who was axed by SNL after video surfaced of him making fun of Chinese people.



Media disdain for model citizen Tim Tebow is so ridiculous that on Monday Carron J. Phillips, of The Shadow League blog, compares him to law-breaking actress Felicity Huffman. She got 14 days in jail, a $30,000 fine and community service for conspiracy to fix her daughter's SAT scores. Tebow, who angered the Left by going on ESPN Friday to say he opposes pay for college athletes, is "convicted" with Huffman, by Phillips, for the high crime of "white privilege."



On Monday, it was reported that inaugural Women’s March co-chairs Bob Bland, Tamika Mallory and Linda Sarsour were being replaced with 16 new board members. The Washington Post had the scoop, and its headline announcing “Women’s March cutting ties with three original board members accused of anti-Semitism” made it sound like the radical left-wing group was finally taking a stand against anti-Semitism within its leadership, but that couldn’t be further from the truth.