The press has gone into hyperbolic overdrive criticizing the Trump administration for separating families caught illegally crossing into the U.S. from Mexico. They clearly want the public, against all evidence, to believe that questionable processing of illegal-immigrant children and their families only began after Donald Trump took office last year. But in January 2016, the Associated Press, the Washington Post, and a Senate committee issued lengthy reports about unaccompanied children who were released to human traffickers. White House reporters, particularly at AP, utterly failed to push the Obama administration over how this was allowed to happen.



Over the weekend, Justin Gaertner, a wounded U.S. Marine veteran, came under fire because a New Yorker journalist mistook his tattoo for a Nazi symbol. The staff writer and fact checker, Talia Lavin, took to Twitter to condemn the man who now works for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) as a forensic analyst.



Appearing to take the show's host by surprise, Henry Cuellar, a Democrat in Texas's congressional delegation contended Saturday on CNN that in 2014, the conditions at detention centers holding unaccompanied and separated illegal-immigrant children were "kept quiet under the Obama Administration." That's probably correct, but it should also be noted that enough info had leaked out that that the press, if it had been genuinely interested, could have investigated matters further, and clearly didn't.



The Wall Street Journal's Kimberley Strassel appeared on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show Friday to discuss Thursday's Inspector General report on "Various Actions by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Justice in Advance of the 2016 Election." She made the big-picture point most of the rest of the press is either ignoring or denying, namely that the IG has delivered "a searing indictment of the entire FBI and its culture."



https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/17pdf/16-980_f2q3.pdfMonday afternoon, the Associated Press covered the just-released Supreme Court decision on Ohio's voter-roll purging procedures. Both the APNews.com tease and reporter Mark Sherman's content misled readers by stating that the Court, in upholding those procedures, had declared that "States can target people who haven’t cast ballots in a while in efforts to purge their voting rolls." Since when is trying to make sure that voters still live where they say they live is a form of "targeting"? And since when is six years "a while"?



A Net Neutrality-free Internet – is the Internet status quo. It’s “The Internet as we know it.” Everything you knew about the Internet the first two-plus decades – is what you know about the Internet now. Everything else being flung at you by the Media-Left – is just ideological monkey poo.



A Net Neutrality-free Internet – is the Internet status quo. It’s “The Internet as we know it.”

Everything you knew about the Internet the first two-plus decades – is what you know about the Internet now.

Everything else being flung at you by the Media-Left – is just ideological monkey poo.



Snopes.com's so-called "fact checks" are so often inane — NewsBusters has caught it "fact-checking" an obviously satirical post — that it's tempting to dismiss it as irrelevant. That would be a mistake. It's therefore important to call sites like Snopes out when they play their deceptive "fact check" games. That's what the site's Bethania Palma definitely did in discussing a claim about California's recently-passed water-use legislation.



On Wednesday, media outlets began reporting of a draft Justice Department Inspector General report floating around that was highly critical of former FBI Director James Comey and former Attorney General Loretta Lynch. But come Thursday evening, both CBS and NBC failed to mention it even though they each had the opportunity to report the development during two of evening broadcasts and their morning shows.



On Monday, columnist James Freeman at the Wall Street Journal's "Best of the Web" noted the selective memories seen in the vast majority of the press over President Donald Trump's relatively noncommittal but nonetheless protocol-breaking tweet an hour before Friday morning's upcoming jobs report. Many of them had a serious case of the vapors, but didn't recall three instances when former President Barack Obama did the same thing during his presidency, with as much or more specificity.



The folks at CNN were fuming Tuesday after a correspondent and her cameraperson, along with those from the Associated Press, were kept out of a press event held by the EPA to discuss a plan to deal with a certain kind of toxin in water supplies. And during The Situation Room that evening, a host of CNN personalities threw hissy fits about not being allowed in. They even seemed to suggest the EPA couldn’t be held accountable unless CNN was in that room.



On Wednesday, the California Energy Commission adopted "standards requiring solar systems for new homes" beginning in 2020. Kathleen Ronayne at the Associated Press published a virtual press release celebrating the move, and presented woefully incomplete information about the alleged financial benefits of this unelected body's latest move.