House Republicans gave Democrats a chance to walk-the-walk on Wednesday when they put on the floor a nonbinding resolution in support of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the agency many liberals had been declaring should be abolished. The opposition to ICE failed spectacularly as only 34 were willing to vote “no.” It was an embarrassing turn of events that went completely unreported on the evening newscasts of ABC, CBS, and NBC.



Sparks flew on Capitol Hill Thursday as House Republicans grilled anti-Trump FBI agent Peter Strzok about his bias and its possible influence on the high-profile investigations of Hilary Clinton and President Donald Trump. The hearing was basically a zoo between Democratic outbursts, Strzok’s righteous indignation, and Republicans holding them back. Of course, liberal media outlets like ABC rushed to Strzok’s defense.



Immediately following a dinnertime break in the marathon grilling of anti-Trump FBI agent Peter Strzok in a joint House committee hearing on Thursday, MSNBC host Chuck Todd kicked off MTP Daily by siding with the former FBI agent and argued that President Trump and the GOP were empowering Russian President Vladimir Putin. And it was more than just baseless speculation, he insinuated it was their intent.



On Wednesday, anti-Trump FBI lawyer Lisa Page was supposed to appear on Capitol Hill for a joint hearing with the House Judiciary and Oversight Committees who were investigating alleged political bias against the Trump campaign by the FBI. But instead of complying with the Congressional subpoena that called her there, she defied it and didn’t show up. The allegations against her were serious but the major broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) didn’t find anything interesting about thesubpoena snub.



Jim Acosta, a legend in his own mind for shouting impertinent questions at President Donald Trump and Press Secretary Sarah Sanders at inappropriate times while insisting that he "won't be shushed" or "be the wallflower," interviewed Congressman Ruben Gallego Monday on CNN's Situation Room about his position on and the wisdom of calls by many Democrats, including three U.S. senators, to abolish the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency. After the Arizona Democrat twice dodged his questions, Acosta, the self-described tough guy, groveled: "I have to ask, I have to pressure you on this, and forgive me, congressman."



My column a fortnight ago, titled "Diversity and Inclusion Harm," focused on the dumbing down of science, technology, engineering and mathematics curricula to achieve a more pleasing mixture of participants in terms of race and sex. Heather Mac Donald, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, wrote about this in her article titled "How Identity Politics Is Harming the Sciences."



CNN's Brian Stelter and NRA spokesperson Dana Loesch got into a Twitter spat Monday evening over the press's handling of the story behind Getty Images photographer John Moore's "iconic" photo of a crying 2-year-old little girl at the U.S.-Mexico border. As usual, Loesch wiped the floor with the network's Reliable Sources host. During the back-and-forth, Stelter responded to Loesch's criticism of CNN's original story about the photo by pointing to a sentence stating that "A spokesman for US Customs and Border Protection later told CNN that the girl and her mother were not separated." What he really pointed to was an undisclosed stealth edit the network apparently hoped no one would see.



On June 19, Alec Sears at NewsBusters covered then-New Yorker Magazine "fact-checker" Talia Lavin, who posted a now-deleted tweet about a photo of Justin Gaertner, a combat-wounded war veteran and computer forensic analyst for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. She falsely claimed that a tattoo on Gaertner's elbow was a Nazi Iron Cross. Per ICE, it really is a Maltese Cross, the symbol of double amputee Gaertner’s platoon in Afghanistan, Titan 2. Despite her tweet's deletion and her apology, Lavin's subsequent conduct shows that she hasn't learned a thing.



On Wednesday's edition of The Five on Fox news, Juan Williams passed off Peter Fonda's overtly threatening tweet wishing that 12-year-old Barron Trump should "be put in a cage with pedophiles" as "poorly worded." He also claimed that his fellow hosts were "taking delight" in the appearance of Fonda's series of threatening tweets, because talking about them "takes away from the conversation focusing on what President Trump did."



Pictures may sometimes be worth 1,000 words, but they often either don't tell the whole story or tell a misleading one. Significant issues have emerged with what the press has read into the "iconic" photo taken of a crying two year-old taken at the U.S.-Mexico border by Getty Images photographer John Moore. The most important one, according to a UK Daily Mail interview with the girl's father left behind in Honduras with the couple's other three children, is that mother and daughter "were never separated by border control agents and remain together."



The press has gone into hyperbolic overdrive criticizing the Trump administration for separating families caught illegally crossing into the U.S. from Mexico. They clearly want the public, against all evidence, to believe that questionable processing of illegal-immigrant children and their families only began after Donald Trump took office last year. But in January 2016, the Associated Press, the Washington Post, and a Senate committee issued lengthy reports about unaccompanied children who were released to human traffickers. White House reporters, particularly at AP, utterly failed to push the Obama administration over how this was allowed to happen.



Over the weekend, Justin Gaertner, a wounded U.S. Marine veteran, came under fire because a New Yorker journalist mistook his tattoo for a Nazi symbol. The staff writer and fact checker, Talia Lavin, took to Twitter to condemn the man who now works for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) as a forensic analyst.