The recent media frenzy over EPA administrator Scott Pruitt’s travel expenses and use of first-class cabins, often lacked crucial information — like the death threats he has received.

According to The Wall Street Journal in November 2017, Pruitt gets five times as many threats as the previous EPA administrator and there had been “explicit death threats.” His family was also threatened. Yet, some media outlets completely ignored the existence of threats as they criticized his travel costs.


On Wednesday, a Global Opinions Editor at the Washington Post praised the work of Christopher Steele as "extraordinarily prescient," created by a man who "had stumbled onto a breathtaking threat to U.S. national security." Accordingly, Steele, per the headline at Christian Caryl's opinion piece, "is a hero – and Americans owe him their thanks" — a Four-Pinocchio claim by the Post's own standards.


At the New York Times on Saturday (Sunday's print edition), reporter Robert Pear seemed unhappy that the Trump administration is reining in an extra-legal tool used by the government's regulatory leviathan. Reading his article's headline — "Administration Imposes Sweeping Limits on Federal Actions Against Companies" — one would think that companies can now run rampant without fear of federal legal repercussions. That's nonsense.


On Friday, CNN's Evan Perez insulted Congress as people who "don’t have any idea how the law works" relating to surveillance, claiming that "grave harm ... was done by the release of the Republican (Nunes) memo even though it was a dud." How interesting, given that Perez knows, because he reported it in 2013, that Obama administration committed abuses serious enough to warrant an October 2011 FISA Court rebuke. Additionally, the now-FBI-defending Perez should know that in October 2016, the Obama administration admitted that it never changed its ways.


The Daily Caller’s Saagar Enjeti and Joe Simonson published an intrepid piece of reporting early Friday morning exposing CNN’s fishy hiring of former James Comey flack and 10-year-agent Josh Campbell as its latest “law enforcement analyst” to defend the FBI from Republican criticism. Citing a source, the pair reported that “Comey had a direct hand in securing [Campbell’s] CNN position in return for an exclusive interview.”


CNN media reporter Brian Stelter was up in arms during Sunday’s Reliable Sources as he ranted about how the release of Nunes memo was a win for Fox News, more specifically Sean Hannity, and all the people in conservative media trying to create what he called an “alternative reality.”


On Saturday's Fox & Friends, syndicated columnist and investigative reporter Michelle Malkin sharply criticized the establishment press's sharp U-turn on law-enforcement transparency from George W. Bush's presidency. She in effect observed that one of the key reasons for the current "stonewall media" environment is self-protection.


Since the release of the bombshell House Intelligence Committee memo detailing alleged misconduct by the FBI and the DOJ to obtain warrants through a FISA court, the liberal media have been focused on combating President Trump and the GOP for releasing the memo instead of the contents within it. A clear demonstration of this occurred during NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday where moderator Chuck Todd was receptive to attacks against the memo but aggressively pushed back against supporters.


The knives came out on ABC during their Sunday morning programming as they made President Trump and the GOP the target of their hyperbolic smear campaign following the release of the House Intelligence Committee memo detailing alleged misconduct by the FBI and Justice Department. And at one point during This Week, host George Stephanopoulos and Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz suggested that the “discord” and “mistrust” sowed by Republicans was ultimately helping Russian President Vladimir Putin.


Since the House Intelligence Committee, chaired by Congressman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), voted on Monday to release a memo detailing alleged misconduct and legal abuses by the FBI, the three major broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) have been acting like the mouthpiece for the Democratic Party. Between January 29, when the vote was held, and February 1, the networks dedicated roughly three and a half times the coverage to worries about releasing the memo than the allegations against the FBI than its purported contents.


At the New York Times, Wednesday's print edition version of Adam Goldman's and Matt Apuzzo's story on Deputy Director Andrew McCabe's departure from the FBI claims he "abruptly stepped down ... after months of withering criticism from President Trump ... (and) pressure from the head of the bureau ..." That isn't where the Times started when news of McCabe's departure first broke Tuesday. None of the story's original or six subsequent iterations seen at NewDiffs.org mention the "insurance policy" controversy which has tarnished McCabe's tenure.


The FBI was caught off guard Monday when Deputy Director Andrew McCabe decided to kick off his retirement early and resigned his post with little fanfare. Speculation swirled over why he chose that day to call it quits but the liberal networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) decided only one person was really to blame: President Trump and his desire to obstruct justice. That despite the fact that other close sources cited a harsh Inspector General investigation report coming down the pike.