In July, Adam Grant, organizational psychologist at Wharton Business School, tweeted: “Agendas aren't driven by problems. They're driven by solutions. Calling out what's wrong without proposing ways to make it right is complaining.” This week, complaining was the order of the day.



Nothing “free” ever really is, but that didn’t stop The Washington Post from depicting “free” college as a “no-lose proposition for a politician.” The Post noted that several Democratic presidential candidates have pledged to do just that. But the Post acknowledged the devil is not in the details, it is the details. Currently liberals are all fighting over those to decide not only which taxpayers pay for it, but who should be eligible in the first place. Higher education economics reporter Danielle Douglas-Gabriel touted free college as a campaign goal and highlighted that, but ignored conservative views on tuition assistance programs in her July 28 piece. 



You know, there are plenty of Econ 101 students who could tell you that raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour is a bad thing for the U.S. economy. Plenty of waiters and busboys, too. So the counter argument must get away from the facts of the issue and offer something a little more emotionally-charged, like “the racist history of tipping,” in order to push for higher wages in the service industry.



Multimedia journalists beware, if you create a video about a candidate’s proposal without any opposing perspectives, that’s not news and your video will look like blatant advertising. That’s exactly what CNBC’s video about Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and her student loan plan looked like on June 14. It described Warren’s plan in detail, but only her details beginning with her words and citing others on her side.



Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren has grand ambitions for spending other people’s money. Her latest proposal was (by her own estimation) a $1.25 trillion policy proposal for student loan forgiveness and free college.

CBS News made a $49,950,000 error when it reported that Warren’s reparations plan “would also create some incentives for black students and lower-income families such as a fund with at least $50 million for historically black colleges and universities.”



At Slate.com on Friday, Felix Salmon called the Ford Motor Company "heartless" for its plans to phase out most of its car models, because "The losers, of course, will be the workers." Saturday, Ford responded that no jobs will be lost at its Chicago Assembly plant in converting it to light truck production. Salmon posted that response at the end of his column, but in three days he and Slate haven't changed their "heartless" — and baseless — assessment.



A recent article in The Guardian dons the foreboding title "Robots will destroy our jobs -- and we're not ready for it." The article claims, "For every job created by robotic automation, several more will be eliminated entirely. ... This disruption will have a devastating impact on our workforce." 



I'm calling foul on all the leftists rushing to protect the NFL's protest crusaders from President Donald Trump's criticism of their national anthem antics. Their shabby line of defense? The NFL is a "private enterprise" whose "rights" are being violated by those who dare to challenge the league's political radicalization. The anti-Trump Democratic Coalition has even filed an ethics complaint alleging that the president's comments constitute a criminal violation against using government offices "to influence the employment decisions and practices" of a private entity.



Somehow, CNN thought it’d be an excellent idea to give New Day co-host Chris Cuomo a week-long tryout for a possible primetime show. Needless to say, Cuomo made a fool of himself on Wednesday, pushing fake news about climate change and alleging storms like Hurricane Harvey are happening “every other year.”



On the Wednesday edition of her HLN show, conservative/libertarian host S.E. Cupp ripped into the current political debate over disaster relief funding in light of Hurricane Harvey that’s centered around how lawmakers felt about the so-called Sandy relief package in January 2013.



What everyone knew would happen as a result of Philadelphia's 1.5 cents-per-ounce soda tax began materializing on Wednesday, as Pepsi announced that it would lay off roughly 20 percent of its workforce there over the next several months. Coverage at both Philly.com and Associated Press allowed the city to engage in fantasy by claiming without meaningful challenge, or even clarification, that Pepsi in particular, but clearly other beverage makers by implication, should be using profits earned elsewhere to subsidize their Philly operations.



Andrew Ross Sorkin is considered a financial guru - a savant of all things business.  So how is he so very, very wrong about government teat specialist Elon Musk?: “Donald Trump: Please think about calling Elon Musk….Mr. Musk…(is) the real-life Tony Stark behind Tesla, the electric car company; SolarCity, the solar power provider; and SpaceX, the rocket company….”

Actually, Elon Musk isn’t the Tony Stark of anything.  And the only person behind Tesla and Solar City is a government bureaucrat - writing Musk yet another government check.