CANBERRA, Australia — Here in Australia, "Question Time" has long been one of my favorite exercises of parliamentary democracy. The prime minister and government ministers appear before other elected members in support of their policies, while the opposition asks pointed and sometimes funny questions in an effort to belittle those policies.



NBC went all-out against President Donald Trump’s foreign policy during Thursday’s edition of Nightly News. They knocked Trump for getting tough with Iran, pretended he didn’t get tough with Russia, left out key parts of favorable quotes, and repeated dubiously sourced ones. “In these early days of his administration, President Trump is signaling a willingness to take the tough approach over traditional diplomacy no matter the country,” quipped anchor Lester Holt, handing it off to Hillary Clinton-super fan Andrea Mitchell. 



It would appear that Yuri Kageyama at the Associated Press has fallen into the trap of believing the rubbish her employer and much of the rest of the world's press has been pushing about how the world's economies really aren't performing all that poorly, that this "new normal" world isn't all that bad, and what we are seeing is all we have a right to expect.

You see, Kageyama doesn't understand why the world's stock markets are tanking when there is so much "data showing economies on the mend."



In what certainly won’t be the latest case of irony in the liberal media, Tuesday’s CBS Evening News immediately pivoted from a full report on surging gun sales in the United States following mass shootings to a piece prominently touting Australia’s massive gun control and confiscation initiatives carried out in the 1990's.



New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof quickly found something else to blame for the killing of two journalists besides the actual killer: America's gun culture, while glossing over the killer's mental disturbance. Kristof is notorious for using tragedies for political gain, like he did after the Boston Marathon bombing, and after the 2011 assassinations in Tuscon.



"I think this guy has a lot more, a lot different motives than religion driving him. And he finally found a way, anyway, to express himself in his end as he died." 

That was how Hardball host Chris Matthews closed a December 15 roundtable discussion segment about Sydney hostage-taker Man Haron Monis. Earlier in the segment, Matthews seemed perplexed as to why Americans would fear a similar incident happening on American soil, arguing that essentially such an incident would be no more or less rare than a school or workplace shooting motivated by non-religious factors.



In a scathing article for the Los Angeles Times on Sunday, reporter Robyn Dixon slammed Australia as “The adolescent country. The bit player. The shrimp of the schoolyard.” She contemptuously added: “For Australians it's not so bad – most of the time – to be so far away, so overlooked, so seemingly insignificant as to almost never factor in major international news. The lifestyle makes up for it.”



John Fund at National Review has written about three recent elections that show “Liberals In Retreat,” but only one is domestic: the Colorado gun-rights recall. The other two liberal defeats were in Norway and Australia.

A quick Nexis search demonstrated that ABC, CBS, and NBC all skipped the conservative victories in Norway and Australia -- but all three found time for news briefs in 2007 when Labor prime minister Kevin Rudd was elected in Australia on an anti-Iraq war platform. Meanwhile, lighter-than-air "Good Morning America" on ABC did find "news" Down Under when it came to trickle-down celebrity updates on Michael Jackson's daughter:



On Tuesday, liberal stalwart NPR hyped a BBC World Service poll that found that "if the world picked U.S. president, election would be a blowout" for President Obama. Writer Eyder Peralta's item, which was the number-one most-viewed on its website, spotlighted that the poll "taken in 21 countries...found for the most part, foreign countries preferred Obama. The only exception was Pakistan where more people said they preferred Romney."

The BBC poll, conducted between July 3 and September 3, found that the most strongly pro-Obama country, to no one's shock, was France, with 72 percent of respondents supporting the incumbent Democrat. The second highest pro-Obama country was Australia, followed by Kenya, Nigeria, and Canada.



A proposed "culturally insensitive" traffic law in New South Wales, Australia, could land Muslim women of good conscience in jail for a year, the Associated Press alerted readers in a July 10 story. Essentially the law requires motorists pulled over by police officers to show their faces so that officers can confirm their identity against a driver's license photo.

Failure to do so could result in a fine and/or jail time.

"A vigorous debate that the proposal has triggered reflects the cultural clashes being ignited by the growing influx of Muslim immigrants and the unease that visible symbols of Islam are causing in predominantly white Christian Australia since 1973 when the government relaxed its immigration policy," the AP preached.

But buried deeper in the article was an explanation of why the bill is being considered in the first place (emphasis mine):



Lest one would think liberal bias isn't an international phenomenon, the Australian Broadcasting Company (their ABC News) was showing their sympathies Saturday with a brief story titled "International Whores Day to Tackle Discrimination." Apparently, it is an injustice that prostitutes have a more difficult time in child custody cases, or getting bank loans or buying newspaper ads:   

Groups representing sex workers around the country are calling for anti-discrimination laws to protect them.

The head of the Scarlet Alliance, Janelle Fawkes, says there are laws protecting sex workers in place in Queensland, Tasmania and the ACT, but they are lacking in the other states and territories.

She says today, being marked by sex workers as International Whores Day, is about creating awareness within the community of discrimination.

"Currently levels of discrimination against sex workers are unacceptably high," she said.



The Pentagon rescinded the invitation of evangelist Franklin Graham to speak at its May 6 National Day of Prayer event because of complaints about his previous comments about Islam.

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation expressed its concern over Graham's involvement with the event in an April 19 letter sent to Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. MRFF's complaint about Graham, the son of Rev. Billy Graham, focused on remarks he made after 9/11 in which he called Islam "wicked" and "evil" and his lack of apology for those words.

Col. Tom Collins, an Army spokesman, told ABC News on April 22, "This Army honors all faiths and tries to inculcate our soldiers and work force with an appreciation of all faiths and his past comments just were not appropriate for this venue."