When the U.S.-based crowdfunding website GoFundMe booted Australian athlete Israel Folau, critics had no idea it would be the best thing they could do for him. Folau is a popular national figure both as an athlete and an outspoken Christian. He was fired from his profession and deplatformed when he used GoFundMe to rally funds for a legal case to take his job back. Christian Australians however, have rallied around him in a huge way.



This weekend, another political earthquake hit the establishment. After trailing in every poll and being left for dead by liberals in the media, Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the conservatives in Australia won a shocking victory. But, just like with Brexit, Donald Trump’s win in 2016 and other examples, the New York Times on Sunday responded by sneering. In This case, the paper offered up the worst insult coming from Manhattan Liberals: Parts of Australia are now like the “American south.”



In a pre-recorded interview that aired on Tuesday's Amanpour and Company, PBS host Christiane Amanpour slanted left on gun control and global warming alarmism as she spoke with liberal New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.



At CNN, the once-proud network has ceased becoming a true news organization with a distinct line between anchors/hosts vs. analysts vs. commentators vs. reporters, but instead a place in which all groups provide up hot takes and snide remarks. And that was on display during Tuesday afternoons’s CNN Newsroom as host Brooke Baldwin and New Day’s Alisyn Camerota cheered the far-left activism of the Hogg family, hailed the March for Our Lives as having given them “goosebumps,” and pushing Australian-style mass gun confiscation to “fix” mass shootings.



As Australia’s election looms, the New York Times’ Australia bureau chief Damien Cave is spreading opposition research for the liberals in “Toxic Speech Derails Politicians in Australia. Some Call It Progress.” Cave, paranoid as ever about racism in conservative politics, managed to string together some tasteless social media posts into a general condemnation of conservative politics worldwide, for Friday’s New York Times. He blamed the usual suspects: "These groups have already had some success. Their perspective on immigrants is frequently found in the Murdoch-run news media..."



If one needed evidence of the gross ignorance of millennials, and their teachers and college professors, it's their solid support for socialism and socialist presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders. Socialism has produced tragedy wherever it has been implemented. Last year marked the 40th anniversary of nearly 1,000 Americans perishing in a mass suicide/murder in the jungles of Guyana. Just as Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez see socialism as mankind's salvation, so, too, did Rev. Jim Jones, who told his followers, “God is Socialism, and I am Principle Socialism, and that's what makes me God.”



New York Times Magazine staff writer Jonathan Mahler and media reporter Jim Rutenberg teamed on a colossal, three-part investigation of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire (and family drama), using the mogul’s sale of his 21st Century Fox empire to Walt Disney as the catalyst for an incredibly noxious hit piece on Fox News, which is accused of virtually everything wrong with the world. The tone is amazingly ideological and personally hostile, perhaps the most virulent and conspiracy-minded attack on Fox News ever issued by the paper, certainly the longest one, against some stiff competition. It reads more like a paranoid left-wing screed from The Nation or In These Times than it does content for an objective newspaper.



On Sunday's AM Joy show on MSNBC, host Joy Reid and The Intercept's Mehdi Hasan devoted a segment to fretting that there is a double standard in the treatment of Muslims as compared to whites after a mass shooting. Reid also invoked a debunked claim that white supremacist Dylann Roof was given special treatment after the Charleston massacre, and Hasan cited a misleading study claiming that most terrorism in the U.S. in the past decade has been perpetrated by whites.



Comedian Jim Jeffries spent his Tuesday evening agonizing over the scourge of racism and what factors have contributed to it the most in recent years. As you’d expect coming from a showbiz lefty, he’s concluded the onus of racism is on right-wingers, whose desire for a “pointless wall” and faith in the power of “thoughts and prayers” leads to both radicalism and inaction in response to acts of hatred.



On Saturday's Smerconish show on CNN, host Michael Smerconish brought aboard Democratic activist and media darling from the 2016 presidential campaign, Khizr Khan, and gave him an unchallenged forum to hint that the U.S. has helped create immigrants who are fleeing wars and climate change. He also tied defeating President Donald Trump in 2020 to thwarting the kind of white nationalism that led to the recent terrorist attack on a mosque in New Zealand.



Secret City: Under the Eagle, the second season of Netflix's Australian political drama released March 6, portrayed Americans as lying to their allies, droning their friends, and not caring if innocent people are hurt or killed in the process. This season finds reporter Harriet Dunkley (Anna Torv) investigating a cover up in the Australian government. When an explosion at a suburban home kills four people, it is initially blamed on a gas leak, then on the family's teenaged son, who survived. The truth, as it turns out, is far more sinister and, of course, the Americans are involved.



Reporting from Sydney, New York Times Australia bureau chief Damien Cave provided a conservative-mocking “news analysis,” “Coal Lobby Turns Up Heat, and Australia Wilts Under Climate Change.” The text box reproached the country: “A progressive nation remains in thrall to the energy industry.” The online headline: “Australia Wilts From Climate Change. Why Can’t Its Politicians Act?” In Cave's mind, Australia is throwing away its wonderful left-wing history for the devolutionary “circus” of global-warming skepticism.