Gutfeld Lambasts ‘Spineless’ Bloomingdale’s, ‘Press Safety Patrol’ for T-Shirt Hubbub

Led by co-host Greg Gutfeld, three co-hosts on FNC’s The Five lit into Bloomingdale’s during Tuesday’s show for their nonsensical kowtowing to angry journalists by pulling a novelty t-shirt (found by a WPIX-TV reporter Allison Kaden) on a mannequin that read “Fake News.”

Gutfeld led off by ripping Kaden as a “triggered reporter” who had claimed that selling the shirt “delegitimizes hardworking journalists.” He correctly noted that he’s “not sure how a shirt on a dummy does that” and joked that he has a Sex Pistols t-shirt with “Anarchy in the U.K.,” but that hasn’t led him to topple the United Kingdom.

 

 

He then elaborated as only he could (click “expand”):

But this isn't really about shirts. It's about the modern, spineless corporation cowed by a tweet, reacting like Dandelions in a strong wind. A spokesperson said: “We apologize to anyone who found this t-shirt distressing” as if distressed shirts are the problem. But as you know, once you apologize, you just egg on those who are bored. Another member of the press safety patrol tweeted to Bloomingdale’s that its apology wasn't sincere. “Please try again,” the tweet dripped as if a 1,000 apologies could ever satisfy those who snip fear. So, good job, Bloomingdale's. One dummy and of storefront window is cold and topless while another dummy scores a scalp. I can hardly wait to see where this is headed. I saw a mannequin in SoHo wearing fishnet stockings. Fishnets — they’re used to trap fish. What kind of message does that send our youth? 

Gutfeld then went to Juan Williams and sought to guess how Williams would refute him by citing the BBC News reporter “shoved at a Trump rally” Monday night “by a surly drunk who was shouting fake news.” The former rejected that argument because “if you notice, it's a Trump supporter holding back that drunk jerk.”

Williams responded that he didn’t like the shirt and wouldn’t buy it, which was no surprise to his colleagues.

Fellow co-host and primetime FBN host Kennedy went next, opining (click “expand”):

It's one of those phrases that has been inserted into our modern lexicon and that's okay and it's funny to poke fun at things like that and that's exactly what they are doing. It's not a Trump 2020 campaign shirt....It’s — all it’s showing sarcastically that this phrase is ubiquitous and it's making fun of that. I don't have a problem with it. I do have a problem with the outrage and the apology. Like, I am so offended that you are taking aim at hardworking journalists. That's not the intent and that’s not — if fashion does startle people, if it jars you a little bit, good for them. That's what it's supposed to do. Fashion is supposed to be unapologetic like Dolce & Gabbana. Dolce & Gabbana make fun of everyone. They make fun of everyone and don't care if you’re Selena Gomez or Ariana Grande, they will make fun of there's not enough of that in the world, which is great. There’s not enough pointing out absurdity. There’s too much apologies and too much easy offense and I’m done with it. 

After an amusing tussle with fill-in co-host Morgan Ortagus about the customer service Bloomingdale’s showed (and a joke about our friends at Mediaite), Jesse Watters wrapped things up by making the astute observation about the thin-skinned nature of journalists:

This is about the reporters who dish it out but they can't take it. Think about all the industries reporters have attacked. The NRA, the military, the police department, the NFL, Fox News, talk radio. All this stuff. The minute you say anything about their industry, they lock it down. You can't criticize. Because they have to maintain their status and if their status is threatened, they run a mob at you. 

To see the relevant transcript from FNC’s The Five on February 12, click “expand.”

FNC’s The Five
February 12, 2019
5:37 p.m. Eastern

GREG GUTFELD: Anyway, Bloomingdale's pulled a shirt of a mannequin bearing the words “fake news,” after a triggered reporter tweeted a photo saying the shirt “delegitimizes hardworking journalists.” I'm not sure how a shirt on a dummy does that. I wear a lot of shirts with slogans and this dummy has no impact on anyone. I actually own an “Anarchy in the U.K. Shirt” and I've yet to topple a government yet. But this isn't really about shirts. It's about the modern, spineless corporation cowed by a tweet, reacting like Dandelions in a strong wind. A spokesperson said: “We apologize to anyone who found this t-shirt distressing” as if distressed shirts are the problem. But as you know, once you apologize, you just egg on those who are bored. Another member of the press safety patrol tweeted to Bloomingdale’s that its apology wasn't sincere. “Please try again,” the tweet dripped as if a 1,000 apologies could ever satisfy those who snip fear. So, good job, Bloomingdale's. One dummy and of storefront window is cold and topless while another dummy scores a scalp. I can hardly wait to see where this is headed. I saw a mannequin in SoHo wearing fishnet stockings. Fishnets — they’re used to trap fish. What kind of message does that send our youth? Strong finish there. Okay, Juan, I'm going to do your job. 

JUAN WILLIAMS: Thank you.

GUTFELD: Alright —

JESSE WATTERS: You might be wrong.

GUTFELD: — but Greg, but Greg — last night a reporter was shoved at a Trump rally by a surly drunk who was shouting fake news. Could this chart have contributed to that? To which I say no, Juan. They never saw the shirt and if you notice, it's a trump supporter holding back that drunk jerk. So, now we can move on to another guest. [PANEL LAUGHS]

WATERS: Yes.

WILLIAMS: Juan: I — 

GUTFELD: I played Juan.

WILLIAMS: Is that your point? 

GUTFELD: Yes. I — I wanted to undercut your point. 

WILLIAMS: Well, no, I think this is very real. I just hope — I hope that you understand that people can be offended, like, for example, this business going on with — what is it — Katy Perry's shoes —

GUTFELD: Yes, right.

WILLIAMS: — that look like black face and people say, “hey, it’s offensive” and so then they pull it. I mean there are certain things you don't want. 

GUTFELD: It’s a weird looking shoe. 

WATTERS: But Juan, you are not offended by a fake news t-shirt, are you? 

WILLIAMS: I don't like it if that’s what you’re asking me. 

WATTERS: But you’re not offended by it?

KENNEDY: Then don't buy it. 

WILLIAMS: No, I wouldn't buy it. 

WATTERS: Okay.

KENNEDY: Yeah, that’s right.

WATTERS: Then it passes the Juan test.

WILLIAMS: But I think — I think that when you’re talking about the kind suggestion, by the way, this came from a local New York City TV reporter. 

GUTFELD: And then another reporter and then everybody else was — [MAKES PILES WITH HANDS]

WILLIAMS: Right, but what — what people are reacting to is the enemy of the press thing, right?

WATTERS: Okay.

GUTFELD: But you know what? The thing is, Kennedy, you are an operator of sarcasm. 

KENNEDY: Okay.

GUTFELD: You could be wearing the fake new shirt ironically. 

KENNEDY: Yes.

GUTFELD: You could actually be wearing it.

KENNEDY: On a news broadcast. 

GUTFELD: On a news — yes. Kind of a symbol against Trump. “I am wearing fake news because I think it's a joke.”

KENNEDY: It's one of those phrases that has been inserted into our modern lexicon and that's okay and it's funny to poke fun at things like that and that's exactly what they are doing. It's not a Trump 2020 campaign shirt. 

GUTFELD: Not at — not at Bloomingdale's. Definitely.

KENNEDY: No. It’s — all it’s showing sarcastically that this phrase is ubiquitous and it's making fun of that. I don't have a problem with it. I do have a problem with the outrage and the apology. Like, I am so offended that you are taking aim at hardworking journalists. That's not the intent 

GUTFELD: Yeah.

KENNEDY: — and that’s not — if fashion does startle people, if it jars you a little bit, good for them. That's what it's supposed to do. Fashion is supposed to be unapologetic —

GUTFELD: Tell me about it.

KENNEDY: — like Dolce & Gabbana. Dolce & Gabbana make fun of everyone. They make fun of everyone and don't care if you’re Selena Gomez or Ariana Grande, they will make fun of there's not enough of that in the world, which is great. There’s not enough pointing out absurdity. There’s too much apologies and too much easy offense and I’m done with it. 

GUTFELD: Alright, Kennedy. Morgan, it’s true, though. It’s like — you look at this, it’s not a Trump t-shirt and still the reporters are, like, offended. 

MORGAN ORTAGUS: Yeah, I think that the untold success story in all of this is for Bloomingdale’s, actually. They responded to the tweet right away and I love Bloomingdale’s. I think they have excellent customer service. I tweeted them about my shoes 

GUTFELD: This is — this is terrible.

ORTAGUS: No, I think it’s good. They — they respond to their customers. 

GUTFELD: This is idiotic. They should not be on Twitter because it seems — 

ORTAGUS:  That’s not true.

WATTERS: She loves Bloomingdale’s. She’s trying to curry favor.

GUTFELD: I know what she’s doing. I know what she’s —

ORTAGUS: They responded to my tweet once. 

GUTFELD: — okay, how about this?

ORTAGUS: I got bad shoes. I had new shoes within a week.

GUTFELD: Alright, how about this?

KENNEDY: So, should they not sell the shoes anymore?

GUTFELD: Let's — let’s put — let’s put the shoe on the other foot. Let’s say you say something on The Five, right? 

ORTAGUS: Yeah.

GUTFELD: And that because — one person out there in outer space is offended by and they — and they — and they contact Fox and Fox goes, “we are so sorry that Morgan Ortagus.” Wouldn't you be pissed off —

ORTUGA: Isn’t that — 

GUTFELD: — if they didn't support you?

ORTAGUS: — isn’t that called Mediaite? [PANEL LAUGHS]

GUTFELD: No, that’s what my point is. My point is companies are no longer standing by anybody.

ORTAGUS: No. I think Bloomingdale's is awesome and they have good customer service. 

GUTFELD: You are — this is so selfish of you. You are — oh, gosh no.

ORTAGUS: I want a discount.

WATTERS: Greg, you know what it is? I was going to get the shirt but I don't look good in yellow so I didn't buy it, but this is about the reporters.

ORTAGUS: That’s not what your mom said.

WATTERS: This is about the reporters who dish it out but they can't take it. Think about all the industries reporters have attacked. The NRA, the military, the police department, the NFL, Fox News, talk radio. All this stuff. The minute you say anything about their industry, they lock it down. You can't criticize. 

GUTFELD: Right. How dare you?

WATTERS: Because they have to maintain their status and if their status is threatened, they run a mob at you. 

GUTFELD: Yeah.

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