CBS: Iran ‘Chants Death to America, But More Habit Than Conviction’

On CBS This Morning: Saturday, reporter Elizabeth Palmer did her best to channel the sentiments of Iran following the preliminary nuclear agreement between them and the United States. The CBS reporter proclaimed that “at Friday prayers there was the usual chant of death to America, but more habit than conviction."

Palmer began her report by touting Iranian support for the nuclear deal as being “all about ending its isolation. After marathon negotiations, Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif arrived home a hero especially among the young who hope the new deal will bring their country in from the cold.”

The CBS reporter went on to tout the Iranian leadership's overwhelming support for the deal: 

At Friday prayers there was the usual chant of death to America, but more habit than conviction. The sermon by senior Ayatollah Kashani [sic] made it clear Iran's leaders support this deal. “I congratulate those who lead the talks” he said. “Great job.” For the Iranians, the talks in Lausanne were not so much about nuclear weapons. Iran says it never wanted them in the first place, but about economics. 

Palmer offered little skepticism as she played up how Iran will receive economic relief and noted that “that's why a deal, even a preliminary one, kicked off such a celebration. “I think the economic pressure that people have endured” said David Gafari [sic] “will ease now.” 

The CBS reporter did play a clip of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu condemning the deal with Iran but Palmer concluded by claiming that Republicans in Congress, not Iran potentially cheating on the nuclear deal, could be biggest hurdle of all:

Benjamin Netanyahu's dislike of that Lausanne deal is echoed in the U.S. House of Representatives among Republicans which could make ironing out the final details between now and the end of June the hardest part of all.

 

See relevant transcript below.

CBS This Morning: Saturday 

April 4, 2015

VINITA NAIR:  Now to the continuing reaction both pro and con of to the outline of a nuclear deal with Iran reached this week. In a televised address on Friday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani welcomed the accord and hailed it as a start of a new relationship with the world. 

ANTHONY MASON: The Iranians insist they'll abide by the plan. That would shelve their presumed hope of building atomic weapons for at least 15 years. Israel isn't buying it. Elizabeth Palmer is in our London bureau with the latest. Elizabeth good morning.

ELIZABETH PALMER: Good morning. Well, for Israel, and for the rest of the world for that matter, these negotiations were always about preventing Iran from developing nuclear weapons, but for the Iranians it was something quite different. They were all about ending its isolation. After marathon negotiations, Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif arrived home a hero especially among the young who hope the new deal will bring their country in from the cold. 

At Friday prayers there was the usual chant of death to America, but more habit than conviction. The sermon by senior Ayatollah Kashani [sic] made it clear Iran's leaders support this deal. “I congratulate those who lead the talks” he said. “Great job.” For the Iranians, the talks in Lausanne were not so much about nuclear weapons. Iran says it never wanted them in the first place, but about economics. 

U.S. led sanctions have crippled Iran’s businesses and its currency and sent inflation soaring to 40%. That's why a deal, even a preliminary one, kicked off such a celebration. “I think the economic pressure that people have endured” said David Gafari [sic] “will ease now.” The partying may be premature, as details on sanctions relief haven't been hammered out yet, but the hope is very real. Contrast that with the reaction of Israel's prime minister. 

BENJAMIN NETANYAHU: Such a deal does not block Iran's path to the bomb. Such a deal paves Iran's path to the bomb. 

PALMER: Benjamin Netanyahu's dislike of that Lausanne deal is echoed in the U.S. House of Representatives among Republicans which could make ironing out the final details between now and the end of June the hardest part of all. Anthony, Vinita? 

NAIR: Elisabeth Palmer in our London bureau this morning. Thank you, Elizabeth.

NBDaily Foreign Policy Iran CBS CBS This Morning Elizabeth Palmer

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