Clay Waters

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Clay Waters was director of Times Watch, a former project of the Media Research Center. His self-published whodunnit? is titled Death In The Eye.

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Supreme Court reporter Adam Liptak was quite aggrieved in his "Sidebar" column about a decision involving allegations of excessive force against an Arizona cop. Liptak couldn’t have made it more clear whose side he was on, and focused almost solely on the two liberal dissents, in “Supreme Court Sides With Police Officer Accused of Using Excessive Force.” Liptak devoted 10 paragraphs of the 20-paragraph story to Sotomayor’s dissent, heavy on impassioned quotes, compared to a single paragraph, without quotations, summing up the majority.



The New York Times visited the district of a purportedly vulnerable Republican congresswoman to report “Gun Control and Fall Elections: Moment or Movement?” Reporting from Northern Virginia, Matt Flegenheimer and Jess Bidgood piled another log on the Democratic heat wave toward November, chiding gun rights advocates as sometimes offering "unsavory" tactics, while letting anti-gun teen activists be as classlass as they want to be: ""We’ll outlive them,' said Sean Monteith, 17, a junior at Lewiston High School, adding that he hoped his peers would be able to outvote them, too...."



Christians who opened the New York Times on Easter Sunday were rewarded with a poke in the eye from the front page of the Sunday Review. Most offensive, the smearing subhead to leftist writer Amy Sullivan’s “Trump’s Christian Soldiers": "Most white evangelicals would vote against Jesus himself if he ran as a Democrat.”



Boston Globe columnist and movie critic Ty Burr summoned the ghost of Frank Capra once more to project his liberal cinematic fantasies onto the American populace, and to save us all from the dark reality of President Trump. Burr thinks a gun-grabbing star was born in the form of a teenage Parkland activist, and pushes the conceit past ridiculousness, in “Can Emma Gonzalez give us a Hollywood ending?”



In Friday’s New York Times, reporter Nicholas Fandos used the firing by President Trump of Veterans Affairs secretary David Shulkin to spread irrational fear of privatization at the scandal and corruption-plagued federal organization for veterans assistance: “V.A. Shake-Up Gives Rise to New Fears of Privatized Care.”



For a journalistic enterprise, the New York Times certainly has a tortured view of free expression, with writers puritanically trumpeting their personal boycotts and criticisms of entertainers who aren’t pristinely politically correct. Times columnist Lindy West went after the British liberal, atheist comedian Ricky Gervais for being unashamed to tell “offensive” jokes: “The World Is Evolving and Ricky Gervais Isn’t.” Roxane Gay announced she was boycotting "Roseanne" because star Roseanne Barr is a Trump supporter. Yet comedian Kathy Griffin's comeback from the Trump-severed-head photo incident was cheered.



Taking a clear anti-gun stand, the New York Times sent a platoon of reporters worldwide to cover the anti-gun March for Our Lives for Sunday’s lead slot. On Monday, the paper pivoted to the November elections, with Alexander Burns and Jonathan Martin pressuring Republicans on the front page: “Gun Protests Leave Republicans Scrambling as Midterms Loom.” It’s the same gun-hostile, NRA-obsessed wishful thinking the Times has indulged in for decades, fueled by slanted reporting and expressing regret at past political failures.



The fashion magazine Vogue's newest political feminist heroine is California’s ambitious new liberal Democratic senator, and Vogue made the most of their access to push her as the next president (and first female president). Abby Aguirre tries hard to convince us of Harris’s commanding (yet also stylish) presence in black pearls and stillettos, in classic Vogue style: "Harris's political career -- seven years as district attorney in San Francisco and then another six as attorney general of California -- amounts to an extraordinary run of firsts."



Sunday’s New York Times lead story on the multiple rallies of anti-gun kids was reported by Michael Shear and a teeming throng of at least 19 other reporters around the world: “With Passion and Fury, Students March on Guns – Rebuke of N.R.A. by Huge Crowds Across U.S.” This would be the anti-gun March for Our Lives, not the pro-life March for Life, which the Times virtually ignores every year. Almost the same with the paper’s reluctant, hostile coverage of Tea Party protests. But this anti-gun rally received several thousands words in the paper’s lead slot.



The infamously Democrat-friendly New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse visited retired Sen. Harry Reid for a friendly debriefing. Hulse let the deeply partisan Reid conveniently lay in against his former Republican colleagues and President Trump, with no opposition, in “Senator’s Farewell: ‘I Just Shake My Head.'”



The sudden, if not unexpected, appointment of John Bolton as President Trump’s national security adviser led the New York Times on Friday and the paper packed a year’s worth of predictable “hard-line” and “hawkish” labels in one edition. (The Times has used “hard-line” to describe Soviet Communists and Iranians who support the continuing Islamic death sentence against author Salman Rushdie, so it’s a pretty loaded term in Timesland.



On no other issue does the New York Times betray its liberal slant as it does on illegal immigration, and on Wednesday reporter Liz Robbins reacted with predictably liberal alarm in her “news” story about a sheriff in New York State who had the audacity to agree to help enforce national immigration law through Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE: “Sheriff Joins Federal Immigration Crackdown, in a First for the State.” The bias came early and heavily, starting with the “undocumented immigrants” label, and a tone of liberal horror quickly crept in.



Liam Stack sticks out among even the liberal journalists at the New York Times for his unrelenting snark and his partisan Twitter feed. He was at it again on Wednesday, with the hard news that liberal comedy host John Oliver has rushed out a children’s book to troll one by Vice President Mike Pence’s 24-year-old daughter Charlotte: “When 2 Bunnies Love Each Other Very Much, and Troll the Pences.”



In “The Free Speech Grifters --Why are some of the biggest public intellectuals so fixated with a small minority of liberal college students?” GQ writer Mari Uyehara downplayed the ongoing attacks on free speech by radical left-wing groups against conservative campus speakers (and um, the ACLU?). The real enemy: Those cynical conservatives who evidently enjoy being silenced on campus and aren’t really victims, anyway.



The plea from New York Times reporter Jonathan Weisman appeared in the Sunday Review: “Missing in the Fight Against Anti-Semitism.” The online headline: “Anti-Semitism Is Rising. Why Aren’t American Jews Speaking Up?” But Weisman focused solely and dubiously on controversial rightists and missed several recent examples of Democrats lining up with Louis Farrakhan. Weisman himself has a tangled history with accusations of anti-semitism that make his plea unconvincing.



Peter Beinart, contributing editor at The Atlantic, devoted 1,700 words in the April issue to ludicrously crowning House minority leader and arch-liberal Nancy Pelosi an amazingly effective congressional leader -- and dishonestly calling Republicans sexist for daring to oppose her: “The Nancy Pelosi Problem -- The first female speaker of the House has become the most effective congressional leader of modern times -- and, not coincidentally, the most vilified." He followed up: "...despite attributes that should make her endearing to cultural conservatives -- she is a Catholic Italian American grandmother of nine who entered politics only after staying home to raise her kids -- many Americans greeted her rise with, in the words of the Yale researchers, “contempt, anger, and/or disgust.” It was the same for Hillary Clinton...."



Scientific American continues on its activist leftward path, diluting its science trademark by transmitting biased anti-gun propaganda under the guise of unbiased sociology. The latest entry was posted Wednesday: “Why Are White Men Stockpiling Guns? -- Research suggests it's largely because they're anxious about their ability to protect their families, insecure about their place in the job market and beset by racial fears.”



In Friday’s New York Times, Deborah Solomon and Kitty Bennett mocked President Trump’s new chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow, the conservative economist who will be the next director of the National Economic Council. There was yet another insulting NYT headline: “A TV Commentator Becomes a Presidential Adviser: Go to the Videotape.” The online headline was more blunt: “6 of Larry Kudlow’s Not-So-on-the-Money Predictions.” But what other economist (one who regularly writes for the NYT) has a flawed forecasting record?



The New York Times on Thursday dismissed Larry Kudlow, President Trump’s pick to head the National Economic Council (replacing Gary Cohn) in “President Picks TV Commentator as His Economic Adviser.” The conservative economist and associate director for economics and planning in President Reagan’s Office of Management and Budget was reduced to someone who Trump picked for his loyalty and Trump-style audacity.



The New York Times has fully and unapologetically embraced the children’s crusade of gun control in the aftermath of the Parkland school killings, and is now cheering on the promised nationwide school walkout today. The lead National section story for Wednesday, reported by Stephanie Saul and Anemona Hartocollis, was “Too Young to Protest? 10-Year-Olds Beg to Differ – Thousands of Students Nationwide Plan to Walk Out of Class.”