Christian Toto

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NAD Analyst

Latest from Christian Toto

Consumers have good reason to wonder why they have to pay for cable channels they don't watch. Most cable customers enjoy only a fraction of the channels on their services but end up supporting them all every time they write a check to Comcast or similar providers.

The hullabaloo over Miley Cyrus's sexualized performance during Sunday's Video Music Awards presentation gave bundled cable opponents another very good argument. Why should consumers support a channel like MTV which brings such content into their homes?

There's only one person tough enough to save the country, nay the world, from the sight of Ben Affleck dressed as Batman. President Barack Obama.

Or so some Batman fans thought when they signed a petition at "We the People" to request Affleck's removal from playing the Caped Crusader in the upcoming Man of Steel sequel. "We the People" is part of the White House's official web site where common folk can push change they can believe in.

Far-left director Oliver Stone isn't happy that Bradley Manning was spared a life sentence earlier this week. Stone would like to see Manning, convicted of leaking classified secrets, roaming the country as a free man.

The fact that Manning will spend considerable more time in jail is proof that America is a "tyrannical empire," one ruled by money, not the voters' will. He shared that, and the fear that Hillary Clinton's ascension to the Oval Office is a fait accompli, on his Twitter feed Wednesday night.

First-time filmmaker Steve Laffey knew he was in trouble when his film Fixing America got beat out for a festival slot by a documentary chronicling the gender transition of Cher's child, Chaz Bono.

Laffey shared his frustrations and triumphs Friday at the annual Western Conservative Summit in Denver, an event held by the Centennial Institute and Colorado Christian University.

Jay Leno and David Letterman represent late night TV's biggest rivals. Letterman's decision not to mock the Commander in Chief may be the deciding factor in their final months of head-to-head competition.

In short, Leno is suddenly cleaning Letterman's clock, around the same time Leno upped his comedic attacks on President Barack Obama.

The makers of the upcoming CBS series Under the Dome figured they could add a splash of verisimilitude to their drama by dropping in audio of President Barack Obama.

The network is now having second thoughts, and CBS editors have trimmed the material from the final broadcast.

Saturday Night Live alum Kristen Wiig's next comedy, Girl Most Likely, takes a page out of Hollywood's dog-eared playbook.

When in doubt, bash Bush. The Bridesmaids star plays a burned out woman who goes to live with her estranged mother (Annette Bening). The two clearly have a ways to go before they reconnect, and part of the problem is mama's new beau (Matt Dillon).

Most Americans marvel at the technology at their disposal in 2013, be it a WiFi-enabled iPad or the cell phone in their pocket or purse. Robert Redford sees such goodies as signs of technological excess that may lead to the planet's doom.

The actor, in Cannes to promote his latest film All is Lost, blasted his home country for its past political scandals and thirst for progress.

Alec Baldwin wins the stuffed Teddy bear prize for the most imaginative defense of the IRS scandal engulfing the Obama administration.

Or, to use Baldwin's Twitter turn of phrase, "scandal."

Comedy Central's Jon Stewart held Susan Rice's feet to the fire Friday night over the Benghazi debacle that left four Americans dead.

The liberal comic kept the pressure on Rice, wondering why the bureaucratic post-attack fireworks weren't matched by an equally vigorous effort to save those four people on Sept. 11, 2012.

Fox News's Bill O'Reilly might dub Erik Jendresen a "pinhead" for his comments about the Tea Party - assuming the host wants to mock the man bringing O'Reilly's "Killing Lincoln" book to television.

Erik Jendresen, the writer and executive producer behind the upcoming NatGeo production, compared Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth to the conservative grass roots movement during a press gathering to promote the project.

The late Andrew Breitbart wouldn't be surprised to learn 2012 was the year conservative films finally broke through.

He had a way of predicting media trends, sensing the Web-based technological revolution would let conservatives have a louder voice in the marketplace of ideas.

Comedians have spent the past four years bemoaning how hard it is to poke fun at President Barack Obama.

Obama is too smart, too handsome, too cool, they argued. What they really meant was:

The upcoming documentary "Occupy Unmasked" is getting the kind of promotional push too rarely received by right-of-center films.

The movie, directed by Steve Bannon and featuring the late Andrew Breitbart, tells the story of the chaotic, destructive Occupy Wall Street movement. The message hardly fits the standard theatrical template, which routinely sides with or sympathizes with the bedraggled protesters seeking their "fair" share of the one percent's cash.

Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin could write a Martian character as convincingly as one who pledges allegiance to the GOP.

Based on Sorkin's work, he's never met either an alien or a bona fide conservative.

Most movie goers likely haven’t heard of the Cristero War, the Mexican uprising against draconian government measures designed to stamp out Catholicism during the 1920s.

Pablo Jose Barroso, producer of “For Greater Glory,” can relate. The Mexico native knew very little about this horrific chapter in his country's history before embarking on the film’s production.

The new film “Act of Valor” doesn’t accuse U.S. military members of war crimes, nor does it paint them as cold killing machines.

That simply won’t do for many film critics, who cling to the kind of anti-military movies which routinely flop at the box office. “Valor” uses amateur actors – active duty Navy SEALs – and certainly can be faulted for their flat line readings. And the episodic nature of the movie also invites fair critiques, even if it’s remarkable the cast routinely acted around live gunfire. But many critics went beyond the call of duty to smite a film that dared to show SEALs as heroes, and their efforts to stop terrorists a noble endeavor.

Director Chris Weitz wasn’t satisfied humanizing the plight of illegal immigrants via his Oscar-nominated 2011 film “A Better Life.”

Now, the man who gave us “About a Boy” and “The Golden Compass” has directed a series of videos attacking Alabama’s anti-illegal immigration laws and comparing those who don’t believe in open borders to the state’s most racist political figures of yore.


The children eager to attend Harlem Success Academies don’t care about partisan politics or ideological turf wars. They just want the best education possible. “The Lottery,” a new documentary by Madeleine Sackler, showcases families desperate for an alternative to the New York Public School system.

The film, playing an exclusive engagement through July 15 at the Starz FilmCenter in Denver, follows four such families who enter a lottery system so their children can attend a prestigious charter school. Strip away the interpersonal dynamics and you’ll find a full-throated argument on behalf of charter schools. And those who think only Republicans support school choice measures will be surprised to see a large  number of Democrats eager to give charter schools a try.

Whenever Oscar-winning filmmaker Michael Moore releases a new documentary the reaction in the press is typically jubilant. Rave reviews. Fawning interviews which rarely ask tough questions. Oscar buzz aplenty.

But this time could be different.

Moore’s last film, “Slacker Uprising,” didn’t go straight to DVD. It went straight to download. Now, Moore’s catching heat from, the online film magazine which routinely taunts conservative targets like Gov. Sarah Palin. The site’s new Moore-related post swats the filmmaker for a less than sharp attempt at marketing his upcoming film about the country’s economic collapse. The movie blogger sets up his critique here: