Cal Thomas

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The Justice Department's inspector general, Michael Horowitz, and FBI Director Christopher Wray claim the 500-plus-page report found no "documented" evidence that political bias at the FBI directly influenced the findings in the Clinton investigation or the Justice Department's decision not to prosecute the former secretary of state. People in "flyover country" are more likely to believe pigs can fly than they are to accept that political bias did not expose a clear intent to damage presidential candidate Donald Trump.



I have often thought that tributes to those we love are best made when the object of our affection is still with us, rather than at their funerals. I do not know Charles Krauthammer well, though we would occasionally see each other at Fox News when I worked there and at Washington Nationals baseball games. Others have commented on his brilliance, his dry wit and his skill at deconstructing arguments made by his political opposites.



We've come a long way from harmless playground jibes like “your mother wears combat boots,” to those of today from the likes of Samantha Bee and other leftist “entertainers” who say things about President Trump and his family that are so vulgar they can't be printed in a newspaper or quoted on television.



The scientific, moral and theological battle between life as an "endowed unalienable" right and the evolutionary view that we are just material and energy shaped by pure chance in a random universe with no author of life, no purpose for living and no destination after we die has been won in Ireland by the evolutionists.



“I am shocked, shocked, to find that gambling is going on in here.” — Captain Renault, Casablanca. Human nature being what it is it should come as no shock that the next level of approved gambling in America is sports betting. States already have casinos, the lottery and other ways of separating money from the weak for their ravenous and bottomless coffers, so why not allow betting on sports contests?



CANBERRA, Australia — Here in Australia, "Question Time" has long been one of my favorite exercises of parliamentary democracy. The prime minister and government ministers appear before other elected members in support of their policies, while the opposition asks pointed and sometimes funny questions in an effort to belittle those policies.



MELBOURNE, Australia -- When you hear "world tour" you usually think of superstars performing concerts in various cities for adoring fans. Not so with the presidentially deprived, entitlement-driven Hillary Clinton. Last week, Hillary Clinton came to Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, and to Sydney, its largest, with a huge chip on her shoulder. The chip has been there since the 2016 election and seems to be growing larger with every appearance.



To be vulgar once earned societal disapproval, ostracism from polite company and -- in my grandmother's era — put a young person in danger of having his mouth washed out with soap. Today, vulgarities are now mainstream. People speaking in a way that "would make a sailor blush" are now on primetime television and words once frowned upon in polite society are now a part of what was once known as cordial conversation.



Before meeting with North Korea's "very honorable" (Trump's words) dictator, Kim Jong-Un, the president should bone up on the history of that country's duplicity and deception, including ways it has used the wishful thinking of some past U.S. presidents to achieve its objectives. A good place to start is an essay written by Joshua Muravchik of the American Enterprise Institute for the March 2003 issue of Commentary magazine.



"No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other." (Matthew 6:24) The verse refers to money, but in light of today's debate about the unaccountable devotion many Christian leaders have for President Trump it is not a stretch to apply it to their relationship with him.



"It's a modern changing world, Everything is moving fast. But when it comes to love I like, What they did in the past." -- The Everly Brothers, 1962. Call me old-fashioned -- and I've been called worse -- but do I sense the possible end to the sexual revolution, which exploded in the '60s and whose fallout continues today.



When President Bill Clinton signed the welfare reform act in 1996, which he negotiated with then-Speaker Newt Gingrich, the left claimed people would starve. They didn't. According to the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, between 1996 and 2000, the employment rate for single mothers increased from 63 percent to 76 percent. 



KEY LARGO, Florida — At dinner with friends, I was asked what is wrong with Washington. The question presumes a standard by which "wrong" can be defined. I am frequently asked this question by people who do not live in "the swamp." They don't behave like Washington politicians. If a disagreement arises in their personal or professional life, they discuss it and usually compromise and work things out. Only in Washington, they note, does this rarely happen, and when it does it makes headlines.



Since the beginning of recorded history there have been end of the world predictions. In recent years we have had radio preachers, politicians and scientists declare with certainty that the world would soon end, either because of our decadent lifestyle, or because of "global warming," now known as "climate change."



You wonder how these things begin. For Harvey Schmidt, co-writer of the longest-running musical in history -- who died last week at 88 -- and his collaborator, Tom Jones, it began when the two were students at the University of Texas. In a sense it really began in their romantic hearts. No one could have written what these men wrote, unless they had ever been deeply and passionately in love.



MIAMI -- The list of failures in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, are becoming legion. If any or all of those failures had been addressed, 17 students and teachers might be alive today. In addition to the several balls dropped by the local FBI office, it was later alleged that at least four Broward County sheriff's deputies, including armed school resource officer Scot Peterson, were outside the school during the shooting and instead of rushing in to confront the killer, later identified as Nikolas Cruz, waited four minutes until police officers from Coral Springs arrived to enter the building.



The indictment of 13 Russians and three companies for allegedly creating a “sophisticated network designed to subvert the 2016 election and to support the Trump campaign” is only half the story. While the Justice Department targeted foreign influence, others could have easily said something about the role U.S. media played in influencing the election’s outcome. While not criminal, the U.S. media should at least be shamed for its unrestrained bias for and against both left and right.



In my long career in journalism, I have met many famous people, but none of them impressed me as much as William Franklin "Billy" Graham. The reason had less to do with his fame and movie star looks; it was his humility that was so attractive, so refreshing, so like the One he faithfully served.



Partisans tend to read, watch and listen only, or mostly, to information and opinions that reinforce their beliefs. If information surfaces that counters those beliefs, it is usually disparaged, excused or ignored. That's human nature. Such is the case with the "memo" released last Friday by the Republican majority on the House Intelligence Committee. The four-page document alleges, in the words of a Wall Street Journal editorial: "the FBI and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court appear to have been used to influence the 2016 election and its aftermath."



“Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God.” (Romans 13:1) That verse, written by Paul the Apostle, is one of the most difficult for modern evangelicals to fully accept. It was written at a time when the Roman authorities were bad dudes.