Even though Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) wants to break up Big Tech and regulate it, those who profit from the tech industry support her anyway. Warren had her most successful fundraising quarter yet, raising $125,305 from employees at Facebook, Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and their subsidiaries.

 



Without Russians to blame, liberal media have gone from scapegoating foreign agents to now condemning Facebook’s advertising itself. "That campaigns are now being fought largely online is hardly a revelation, yet only one political party seems to have gotten the message,” The New York Times lamented. In its Oct. 20 article “Trump Campaign Floods Web With Ads, Raking In Cash as Democrats Struggle,” The Times observed, “While the Trump campaign has put its digital operation firmly at the center of the president’s re-election effort, Democrats are struggling to internalize the lessons of the 2016 race and adapt to a political landscape shaped by social media."



In the latest incidence of Big Tech being in bed with liberals, Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife have been caught recommending campaign hires to a Democrat running for office. Campaign spokesman Chris Meagher confirmed that “Zuckerberg sent multiple emails to Mike Schmuhl, Buttigieg’s campaign manager, with names of individuals that he might consider hiring,” Bloomberg reported. In addition, Zuckerberg’s wife Priscilla Chan, “also sent multiple emails to Schmuhl with staff recommendations. Ultimately, two of the people recommended were hired.”



TikTok, the viral Chinese app that may live on your high school student’s phone, serves another devious purpose. It is a propaganda tool for the Chinese government. Australian human rights activist and Uyghur Muslim Arslan Hidayat tweeted a video taken from TikTok which was allegedly posted to an official Chinese police account in the Zhangwan District, Shiyan City, Hubei Province.



If competitive soccer games are too toxically masculine for your taste, and if your idea of “diversity” is an all-black cast, The New York Times has some games for you! The Times in mid-October posted “Fear, Anxiety and Hope: What It Means to Be a Minority in Gaming,” a roundup of diverse and (uniformly) progressive video game creators who The Times hopes will replace gaming’s “toxic” culture.Many of the games specifically deal with the creators’ own trauma and issues of identity. From an artistic perspective, the classic advice of “write what you know” is an understandable starting point, but many of these creators seem happy to jump off the deep end.



The left was not pleased with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to promote the value of “free expression.” After Zuckerberg gave a speech at Georgetown University, where he disavowed expanding the definition of hate speech and defended Facebook’s new policies for political ads, Democrats came after both him and the social media platform.



Facebook and its developers have been in the race to define and correct what the platform calls hate speech. But in a speech given to Georgetown University, CEO Mark Zuckerberg suggested a different direction for the company.



Big tech has presented many problems for the legislators in Washington to tackle. One of those is regulation. Many politicians on both sides of the aisle have discussed government regulation of Big Tech. Government regulation and amending Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act are seen as a solution to the scandals plaguing tech companies.



Twitter Inc. released a blog post titled “World Leaders on Twitter: principles & approach” on Oct. 5, which aimed to give “more context” on their “principles and process” for censoring tweets by world leaders. 



The two female faces of the Democratic run for the presidential nomination can’t seem to agree about policy points. On CNN’s Oct. 15 Democratic Party presidential primary debate, the discussion turned to Big Tech and what the candidates would do about it if they became president.

 



A proposed commission to bully online platforms into cracking down harder on speech has civil rights advocates outraged, The Hill reported. At least three bills were discussed, including ones targeting cybersecurity, drones and online platforms. The last bill was the “National Commission on Online Platforms and Homeland Security Act,” which Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-MS) explained by saying: 



The intolerant left has a long list of things they consider unforgivable sins. One of them includes simply talking and dining with those on the right. Politico published a story Oct. 14, which said that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg “has been hosting informal talks and small, off-the-record dinners with conservative journalists, commentators and at least one Republican lawmaker.”