The New York Times is still trying to spin the congressional sex scandals in the Democrats’ direction, as demonstrated in three stories Friday virtually bragging that their stand on Franken will put them on the “unassailable” “high ground” for Campaign 2018. The paper frantically spun for the party of Bill Clinton on a day when a presidential hopeful for 2020 was resigning in disgrace: "Democrats appear determined to grab the moral high ground in an environment in which they hope sexual harassment becomes a wedge issue in the 2018 midterm elections – even if it costs them popular colleagues and political icons."



In a Thursday morning address on the Senate floor, Minnesota Democratic Senator Al Franken announced that he would step down from office as pressure mounted from his female colleagues. But he went down swinging, noting what he called “irony” in Donald Trump being president and Republican Roy Moore still running for Senate. ABC’s World News Tonight got his hint and spent more time harping on the “irony” than Franken’s resignation, while NBC Nightly News forgot to report he was a Democrat.



One U.S. politician is challenging the media to accurately report on a bill he hopes will show the “humanity of the unborn.”



On MSNBC Live Thursday, host Ali Velshi refused to listen to his guest, Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) after he started to give the liberal host an answer he didn’t like. Hosts Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle first asked the member of the Armed Services Committee about Trump’s handling of North Korea’s threat against the U.S. territory of Guam. 

 


CNN tarred the Romney campaign with Todd Akin's infamous "legitimate rape" comment, and now it is trying to do the same to Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) for making a much less controversial remark on rape and pregnancy.

Franks, referring to a bill that would ban abortions after 20 weeks, and arguing that no exception should be made for pregnancies from rape, claimed that "the incidents of rape resulting in pregnancy are very low." He clarified that the number of those cases was low and should not be the focus of the debate, but Democrats (and the media) pounced and lampooned him for saying that.



On Wednesday's All In show, MSNBC host Chris Hayes condescendingly compared House Republicans to a "bunch of really ideologically zealous teenagers" who put on events equivalent to "campus conservative clown shows."

As Hayes complained about Republicans pushing votes on restricting abortion and the repeal of ObamaCare that are not likely to pass into law, Hayes complained:



MSNBC's Chris Matthews is so hell-bent on trashing Arizona's Republican Governor Jan Brewer after her dust-up with President Obama that on Friday's Hardball he dragged out a poll from November showing a high disapproval of her in her state.

I guess Matthews - who just Tuesday revealed that he had never heard of Congressional insider trading until the President mentioned it during the State of the Union address - missed a poll released two days ago showing high favorability numbers for Brewer (video follows with transcript and commentary):



MSNBC's Chris Matthews claimed Thursday that the unemployment rate is lower now than when Barack Obama took office.

Such was said during a contentious Hardball discussion with Republican Arizona Congressman Trent Franks (video follows with commentary):



In a fine example of the new civility at MSNBC, Lawrence O'Donnell on Tuesday actually yelled at an Arizona Congressman who didn't agree with him about the need for gun control following the shootings in Tucson.

The discussion on "The Last Word" really got heated after the host made the case to Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) that additional security at Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' (D-Ariz.) Congress on Your Corner event wouldn't have mattered because "The overwhelming majority of bullets fired by police officers always miss their target" (video follows with transcript and commentary):