On Monday, the hosts of CBS This Morning, along with Face the Nation moderator John Dickerson, proceeded to defend the Black Lives Matter movement in wake of former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani slamming the left-wing group as “inherently racist.” Dickerson claimed not to know what the Republican was talking about: “So it’s not clear what he means. But what he seems to mean is that the Black Lives Matter phrase is about black lives mattering more. The Black Lives Matter phrase is about the argument that black lives should matter as much as...”



One of James Taranto's recurring categories in his WSJ Best of the Web Today column is "the soft bigotry of low expectations."  We have a great candidate for it from today's Morning Joe, as, expressing the sentiment of Americans at large, Joe Scarborough asked: "why can't our president be as tough as France's president?" Ouch.

From Scarborough to Mika Brzezinski to Nicolle Wallace, Rudy Giuliani to Michael Hayden, the condemnation of President Obama's weak, shades-wearing, wave-doing, grinning response to the Brussels outrage was relentless. Most brutal and disturbing of all was the assessement of former CIA Director Michael Hayden, who said of Obama's response: "that wasn't a mistake, that wasn't weakness, that was policy, that going to the ballpark and spending less than a minute commenting on the attack. I believe in his heart of hearts the president's policy is that is not that big a deal. There are other things that are more important and that was what he was messaging."



Can you imagine if a conservative TV host interrupted a black woman journalist, instructing her to change the way she said something that was not to his linguistic liking? The cries of racial condescension and sexism would echo through the land.

So will Chris Matthews pay a price in the liberal media for the way he treated April Ryan on this evening's Hardball? When Ryan, of American Urban Radio Networksdescribed Rudy Giuliani as "pro-abortion," Matthews interrupted her: "abortion rights. Pro-abortion rights . . . I don't like [Ryan's] way." The gracious Ryan actually apologized: "I'm sorry."



Welcoming his first guest on his Tuesday Hardball program to discuss the rise of Donald Trump and the "Fall of the House of Bush" and other establishment Republicans, MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews gushed over former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani as the last of a dying breed of "moderate"  "cosmopolitan" pro-choice East Coast Republicans.



A few months ago, I took some flack in these quarters for suggesting that, his annoying liberalism aside, Chris Matthews is in his heart an American patriot.

That same patriotic proclivity displayed itself tonight. On the anniversary of 9-11, Matthews profusely praised his guest Rudy Giuliani for his leadership on that day.  And in a spontaneous aside, Matthews called RFK's assassin, the Palestinian Sirhan B. Sirhan, "the first terrorist."Can you imagine Rachel Maddow—or Barack Obama for that matter—doing the same?



New York Times reporter Patrick Healy portrayed the Republican candidates for president as bumblers blowing their chances against Hillary Clinton with their harsh attacks and right-wing obsessions, in Thursday's "Clinton Uses G.O.P.’s Words to Aid Her Arguments." (No factual backup was provided.) Even former independent prosecutor Ken Starr made an appearance, under spin straight from Bill Clinton's White House: "When White House controversies dogged Mrs. Clinton as first lady, the independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr made her sympathetic with his Javert-like investigations...."



Ginia Bellafante's "Big City" column in Sunday's New York Times smacked of a particular brand of star-struck, fact-allergic old-style liberalism in which Bellafante, metro columnist and occasional reporter for the Times, went after an old enemy, former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani: "The Dark Ages of Giuliani." Some urban liberals will apparently never forgive Giuliani for cleaning up the city and getting crime under control. After Giuliani made a common-sense observation about the homeless, Bellafante was so outraged she compared him to....Donald Trump.



Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani asserted that he would "have her under investigation for about five different crimes right now," and that it is "outrageous that the Justice Department is not moving forward with this."

Calling it a "true criminal case against Hillary Clinton," he further argued that the destruction of the drive which contained 34,000 emails, some of which were government-related, constituted "obstruction of justice" and could be viewed by a court as an "inference of guilt."



MSNBC host Chris Matthews used a portion of his July 7 Hardball interview with Rudy Giuliani to get the moderate Republican to express his wish that his party soften both its tone and policy positions on immigration, social issues, and the environment. 



The American Prospect’s Waldman sympathizes with conservatives who are “unfairly accused of racism,” but says that overall he doesn’t feel too sorry for them given that right-wingers routinely condone actual bigotry from their leaders. Addressing his conservative readers, Waldman admits that sometimes “liberals are too quick to see racist intent in a comment that may be innocuous or at worst unintentionally provocative. But you make heroes out of people like [Rudy] Giuliani, [Rush] Limbaugh, and [Erick] Erickson…and when other people occasionally notice the caustic hairballs of bile they spit onto waiting microphones, the most you can say is, ‘Well, I wouldn't go that far.’ So you have nothing to complain about.”



This week, journalists lash out at ex-NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani for saying he doesn't think Obama loves America, even as Bloomberg's Mark Halperin agrees Democrats said similar things about George W. Bush: "It's a huge double standard in the media." Also, CNN's Christiane Amanpour scoffs at Benjamin Netanyahu's "Strangelovian" speech warning of the dangers of a nuclear-armed Iran, while Netflix star Kevin Spacey outlines how his character would handle GOP obstructionism: "I'd just kill everybody. Just kill them all."



Frank Bruni's latest for the New York Times sported an intriguing title: "Despicable Us -- Scott Walker, the Media and the 2016 Presidential Campaign." Would Bruni be apologizing on behalf of both his paper and other outlets, which have had to retract false criticisms of Wisconsin's GOP governor? No. His media criticism was simply window dressing, an excuse to mock conservative candidates past and present.