On Saturday morning, CBS and NBC both ran predictable reports arguing that human activity is causing global warming, which is causing hurricanes like Florence to be worse, while those who are skeptical are derided as "climate change deniers." By contrast, global warming skeptic Joe Bastardi appeared on both Friday's Fox News at Night and Thursday's Hannity show on FNC. He argued that, while it is true that climate has always undergone change, past hurricane seasons have actually been worse than those in recent decades, as he doubted that humans are making a significant impact on the climate.



Climate alarmists sometimes like to claim skeptical scientists don’t exist, but they do, and one meteorologist had a lot to say on the subject.

In an interview with the MRC’s Business and Media Institute, well-known meteorologist Joe Bastardi dissected and criticized major aspects of the climate change alarmism movement. Drawing on his knowledge of weather and climate history, Bastardi said that “extreme weather” events the media talk about so much are commonplace and the result of normal variability. He also attacked basic arguments about CO2, scientific consensus and alarmist media bias.



Hank Paulson, whose claim to fame in the public sector is panicking and browbeating the nation and its Washington politicians into accepting the Troubled Asset Relief Program in late September 2008, and who just two weeks later "put a (figurative) gun to the heads" of large-bank CEOs to "persuade" them to accept federal "investment" in their enterprises, has re-emerged to tell us, according to the Hill, that "Republicans are 'ready for a serious discussion' on climate change."

As a reminder, in 2007, the late Robert Novak wrote that Paulson "contributed to Bill Clinton in 1992, Democrat Bill Bradley's 2000 presidential campaign, the feminist Emily's List and Wall Street's favorite Democrat, Chuck Schumer," before financially supporting George W. Bush in 2004. Paulson was also "regarded in his own administration as less a true Republican secretary than a transition to the next Democratic Treasury." One of Paulson's current assertions parrots global warming alarmists' claims in mid-May that that a serious and supposedly irreversible collapse of Antarctic Sea ice will catastrophically raise worldwide sea levels. Over the weekend, meteorologist Joe Bastardi, Chief Forecaster at WeatherBell Analytics LLC, relayed some very inconvenient data (bolds are mine):



Ever since Typhoon Haiyan devastated portions of Southeast Asia -- particularly the Philippines -- in early November, members of the self-styled mainstream media and climate alarmists have charged that "the most powerful storm ever" was caused in part by global warming, and more “extreme weather events” will happen because even during a climate change “pause,” the heat “isn't missing -- it's right there in the ocean, waiting to put super typhoons on steroids.”

Those claims are wildly exaggerated as indicated by our friends over at Climate Depot report. In fact, many scientists disagree strongly with them, including weather expert Brian McNoldy, who stated: “While Haiyan was absolutely amazing, it’s not alone. … Extremely intense tropical cyclones are rare, but have always been a part of nature -- we don’t need to find an excuse for them.”



CBS's Face the Nation Sunday spent fifteen minutes discussing climate change and amongst other things its impact on tornadoes - in particular the EF-5 that hit Moore, Oklahoma, last week.

As not one global warming skeptic was invited to participate in the panel, I've taken the liberty of getting opinions from some of the leaders on the realist side of the debate (video follows with commentary and full transcript of the segment at the end of the post):



Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's The O'Reilly Factor on FNC, meteorologist Joe Bastardi of Weatherbell Analytics -- formerly of AccuWeather -- argued against the view that global warming is causing more violent tornadoes and compared Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse's recent comments blaming recent weather disasters on global warming to "ambulance chasing." Bastardi:



As NewsBusters reported, global warming skeptic Marc Morano had a debate about climate change with Bill Nye the Science Guy on CNN's Piers Morgan Tonight Tuesday.

After it concluded, WeatherBell meteorologist Joe Bastardi took to Twitter to lambaste Morgan and Nye for their views on this subject:



Appearing as a guest on FNC's The O'Reilly Factor, meteorologist Joe Bastardi of Weatherbell Analytics -- and formerly of AccuWeather -- debunked a recent statement by Al Gore linking Hurricane Sandy to global warming. Bastardi asserted that the former Vice President's statement is either "stunningly ignorant or stunningly deceptive," and argued that hurricane seasons go through cyclical changes that stretch over decades.



For years America's media have been enthralled by anything that supports the theory that carbon dioxide is warming the planet leading to an imminent cataclysm if governments don't regulate this partially man-made gas.

By contrast, reports that might undermine CO2's importance in global warming, like the following released Tuesday by the AAS Solar Physics Division in Las Cruces, New Mexico, predicting a sharp decrease in solar activity in coming years, typically get either little attention or are downplayed:



Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert on Tuesday actually moderated a debate about global warming.

In fairness, it was less of a debate and more a vehicle for him to make fun of his guests Joe Bastardi of Accuweather and Brenda Ekwurzel of the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Regardless of the comedic intent on the part of the host, there were indeed some wonderful moments, in particular Bastardi pointing out that we're going to know in the next five to ten years whether there really is a connection between increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global temperatures (video follows with highlights and commentary):



"A study released this year by researchers at Yale and George Mason found that 56 percent of Americans trusted weathercasters to tell them about global warming far more than they trusted other news media or public figures like former Vice President Al Gore."

So wrote the New York Times's Leslie Kaufman in a rather surprising piece published Tuesday.

Shhh. Wait. It got better -- A LOT better:



A rare thing happened on Monday's "O'Reilly Factor": a climate alarmist and a global warming skeptic debated on American television Nobel Laureate Al Gore's favorite theory.

In the alarmist corner was Bill Nye the Science Guy.

In the skeptical corner was Accuweather meteorologist Joe Bastardi. 

Moderating the event, and doing a fine job of it, was Fox News's Bill O'Reilly (video embedded below the fold with transcript):