Some left-wing pundits, anticipating that Donald Trump will lose on November 8, are pre-emptively trying to make sure that conservatives take the blame for Trump’s nomination. Gary Legum of Salon argued that right-wing news outlets “have both spent the better part of the Obama administration pushing the exact silly demagoguery  and conspiracy theories that riled up the conservative base and pushed it into nominating a demagogue of its own.” The Washington Monthly’s Martin Longman claimed that “other than John Kasich, at times, and short-timers like George Pataki and maybe Jim Gilmore, the rest of the field represented (or, at least, pandered to) a far right-wing conservative worldview that has been steeping in weaponized stupidity for the entire Obama Era.”



CNN's Alisyn Camerota pressed former New York Governor George Pataki on Tuesday's New Day over Ted Cruz's "New York values" attack on Donald Trump. Camerota noted how Pataki asserted that Cruz "was obviously referring to the liberal values of New York politicians," but wondered, "Wasn't he also talking about...regular New Yorkers?" When the Republican politician denied this was the case, the anchor followed up by asking, "The people of New York voted these politicians in. So, isn't there some smear that they, too, are morally bankrupt?"



After GOP businessman Donald Trump hosted an episode of NBC's long-running Saturday Night Live program -- which drew the show's highest ratings in four years -- the network has decided to give other Republican presidential candidates “equal time” to match the 12 minutes Trump appeared during the Nov. 7 edition of the show.

According to an article posted by Dylan Byers on the CNNMoney website, the unusual offer was made in compliance with the Federal Communication Commission's “Equal Time” rules,

 



Continuing to come unhinged and flash his liberal colors in the first CNBC Republican presidential debate on Wednesday, co-moderator John Harwood pontificated that President Obama has made the United States economy “the strongest in the world.”



Appearing as a guest on Friday's New Day on CNN, GOP presidential candidate George Pataki -- who is known for generally supporting the legality of abortion -- charged that Planned Parenthood has shown a "callous disregard for humanity and people's sensibilities," as he responded to the undercover videos showing employees discussing the sale of body parts from aborted babies. The former New York governor called for the federal government to stop funding the abortion provider with taxpayer dollars.



On Thursday's New Day, CNN's Chris Cuomo wondered if some in the 2016 Republican presidential field might be making the possible redeployment of U.S. troops into Iraq a political issue. When GOP strategist Kevin Madden underlined that "so many Republicans disagree with the President's [Obama's] approach on combating ISIS that so many of these candidates are going to want to draw as stark a contrast as possible," Cuomo replied, "You playing politics, though – with the troops, though?"



Thomas Roberts didn’t stray an inch away from the liberal media narrative about conservative difficulties with Iraq War questions. On the May 20 edition of MSNBC Live, the host interviewed potential 2016 candidate and former New York governor George Pataki on the subject. 



On Sunday’s State of the Union, CNN’s Gloria Borger hosted three prominent Republican politicians to discuss the ongoing debate surrounding Rudy Giuliani and his suggestion that President Obama doesn’t love America. Throughout the combative segment, Borger hit the former New York City mayor for his “hateful” comments and went so far as to claim that he “kind of hijacked the conversation in a different direction.”



How about that, it was actually mentioned on MSNBC last night that President Obama responded to the deadly attack on the US consulate in Benghazi ... by winging to a fundraising "jaunt" in Vegas the following day.

Of course, the awkward fact that Obama did this wasn't cited by one of his innumerable apologists at America's cable version of Pravda. Instead, it came from a Republican acting as surrogate for Mitt Romney after the third and final presidential debate. (video after page break)



The Republican convention was delayed by a day on Monday. It’s not a problem: the national media’s pre-convention spin was timed perfectly, almost as if it was on automatic pilot. In Monday’s New York Times, longtime political writer Adam Nagourney regurgitated the same old, tired political spin that the Republican Party is too conservative and exclusionary on “social issues,” and that their divisive stands will hurt them with “mainstream” voters.

1976. 1980. 1984. 1988. 1992. 1996. 2000. 2004. 2008. Will they ever stop saying this?

 



MSNBC Morning Joe contributor Mike Barnicle repeated the Democrat mantra that repealing Republican tax cuts doesn't constitute a tax increase that he also spouted yesterday on Morning Joe. "The idea that reverting back to a tax rate that existed that people paid into, calling it now a tax increase, I just think that's politics at its worst," said Barnicle.



On Wednesday's Rick's List, CNN's Rick Sanchez tried to connect the overwhelming opposition to the planned Ground Zero mosque to a Florida pastor's "Burn a Koran Day" event. Sanchez asked former New York Governor George Pataki, "Do you feel in any way that some of this backlash...led by some fine gentlemen like yourself...has kind of paved the way for that controversy, and if so, do you feel guilty at all?" [audio clip available here]

Sanchez interviewed Pataki during the prime time edition of his program. Just before the bottom of the 8 pm Eastern hour, the anchor raised Pastor Terry Jones's planned inflammatory protest: "Let me ask you one final question, if I possibly can. There's this new hullabaloo going on in Gainesville, Florida, with this pastor who wants to literally burn Korans. And now, we're getting protests in Afghanistan- our generals are saying this guy's going to get our troops killed."