On Friday's PBS NewsHour, the show's regular "Shields and Brooks" segment unintentionally summed up the major problem conservatives have with the show -- that there is no actual conservative panel member giving a contrasting point of view against liberal columnist Mark Shields as he and New York Times columnist David Brooks often show little disagreement when discussing the week's political news. As the two men were both critical of Republicans over both ObamaCare repeal and the White House budget, not only did Shields at one point declare that "I can't argue with any point that David (Brooks) made," but a bit later, host Judy Woodruff observed that "both of you are saying the same thing." Shields then joked: "What? I hope not. I mean, there's no point in watching."



In a pre-recorded interview in which PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff pressed Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan over whether President Donald Trump's travel ban for some Muslim countries is a good idea, at one point she incorrectly claimed that there had not been any "terrorist incidents" by people from the seven countries on the list. Woodruff: "But there haven't been terrorist incidents perpetrated by people from these countries." But, as documented by The Federalist, there have been two Somalis who made terrorist attacks in the U.S., as well as others who came to the U.S. to give support to Islamic terrorism.



On Friday's week-in-review segment on the PBS NewsHour, everyone was disparaging Donald Trump -- anchor Judy Woodruff, liberal analyst Mark Shields, and pseudo-conservative David Brooks. They mocked Trump as childish for calling Sen. Charles Schumer the "head clown" of the Democrats. Shields weirdly lectured: "Chuck Schumer is a proud and able and dedicated and skillful leader, and you don’t want him as an opponent." So Schumer won't be an opponent to Republicans if you talk nice?



The polite liberal bubble – where they are constantly upset about the incivility of Donald Trump but see themselves as the Essence of Reasonableness as they wail about impending dicatorship – is still full of hot air about Trump tweets. On Friday’s PBS NewsHour, anchor Judy Woodruff asked her regular columnist panel about his failure to stop tweeting.

New York Times columnist David Brooks said there is “fascism” talk in the air, or Trump’s cabinet secretaries could lose control over their bureaucracies. Liberal columnist Mark Shields said Trump’s tweets were “cyberbullying,” especially when bothering “terrific reporters.”



A snobby PBS analyst said less educated Trump voters were "just going with their gene pool." Sadly, if not surprisingly, the analyst was the "right-leaning" pundit on the PBS NewsHour, New York Times columnist David Brooks. Stupid white males are voting for stupid white males. Now if Brooks had said a version of this in 2008 -- that blacks were just voting for their "gene pool" -- he would have been drummed out of the media elite. But mocking stupid whites doesn't ruffle a feather at PBS.



On the heels of my Drudge Report-linked post about NBC’s Ron Allen informing MSNBC on Wednesday that the Paris climate change deal “is designed to stop” weather events like Hurricane Matthew, Thursday’s PBS NewsHour joined ranks of the absurdity as Judy Woodruff and guest Gavin Schmidt from NASA pondered the “interconnection” between the two.



On Friday’s PBS NewsHour, anchor Judy Woodruff thought the police shootings were the top news story of the week, but she wasn’t pleased when both liberal Mark Shields and pseudo-conservative David Brooks reluctantly agreed that looting and disorder were going to help Donald Trump politically.

Looting? Woodruff hadn’t really wanted to get that specific. She suggested that wasn’t typical of Black Lives Matter protests.



On Tuesday, PBS's Judy Woodruff did a live interview with Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein which was carried on Facebook. The entire interview, plus questions asked by viewers, is present at the network's Facebook page.

That interview without the Facebook questions was also broadcast on PBS's NewsHour — but not quite all of it. For some reason, key portions of Stein's answer to Woodruff's final question about whether "literally ... Hillary Clinton is every bit as bad for the country as Donald Trump" are not present. Based on what was edited out, it would appear that the cutouts, at least one of which was done in mid-sentence, were carried out to protect Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton's left flank.



Full Frontal host Samantha Bee joined the set of Wednesday’s PBS NewsHour to promote her TBS show and in the process, she claimed to be an “independent” despite being “excited for Hillary” and defended her show’s near constant use of “salty language” despite a drove of critics (which she argued she ignores). 



PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff was awarded an interview with Republican vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence for Thursday night's newscast, and she questioned Pence from the right about whether Trump can be someone social conservatives can support. But what really stood out was Woodruff's repeated protests against "pretty harsh criticism" of Hillary Clinton. She said "Last question," and then asked the same question three times, insisting the Republicans were just too harsh.



Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, appeared in live PBS/NPR convention coverage on Wednesday night and walked into a barrage of liberal questions designed to shame him and separate him from Donald Trump, who they implied was a terrible Christian. “Conservative” PBS David Brooks not only suggested Trump has no Christian virtues, he told Perkins that social conservatives should sit out the election – obviously making it easier to elect Hillary Clinton.



PBS covered the Republican convention for three hours of prime time on Monday night, in association with its pubcasting buddies at NPR. But they were allergic to showing any Hillary-scandal films that were offered on the convention floor. As a mini-documentary ran about Benghazi, PBS anchors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff clumsily talked over it, and NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson had a wide-eyed freakout at what she claimed was a historically “intense animus” against an opposing candidate.