At Slate.com on Friday, Felix Salmon called the Ford Motor Company "heartless" for its plans to phase out most of its car models, because "The losers, of course, will be the workers." Saturday, Ford responded that no jobs will be lost at its Chicago Assembly plant in converting it to light truck production. Salmon posted that response at the end of his column, but in three days he and Slate haven't changed their "heartless" — and baseless — assessment.



The UK’s surprising decision to exit the European Union brought out typical sneering from journalists, as well as warnings that the decision would bring doom and gloom to the country. Business Insider Finance Editor Lianna Brinded warned Britain was “beyond repair,” and the worst was “yet to come.” 



On Monday, Fusion senior editor Felix Salmon echoed New York Times writer Mark Oppenheimer's call for the end of the tax exemption of religious institutions, but took it one step further: he called for the specific targeting of churches that "remain steadfastly bigoted on the subject" of same-sex "marriage." Salmon contended on Fusion.net that "if your organization does not support the right of gay men and women to marry, then the government should be very clear that you're in the wrong. And it should certainly not bend over backwards to give you the privilege of tax exemption."



Within the space of a week, the Public Editor of The New York Times, Margaret Sullivan, and Sarah Durand, a senior editor of publisher Simon & Schuster subsidiary Atria Books, have vividly illustrated how the game of liberal media bias works.

Let’s start with the Times.



Earlier today, the liberal website Gawker did a document dump including 950 pages worth of confidential documents affiliated with Bain Capital.

The idea was to expose Mitt Romney's alleged tax-dodging schemes with offshore accounts in the Cayman Islands.  Problem being, the parent corporation known as the Gawker Media Group has a little secret of their own.