As if searching for a way to criticize the late 2017 tax cuts, the broadcasts networks aired a series of panicked reports about tax returns in February. Roughly 80 percent of Americans taxes were cut by the legislation, yet the broadcasts complaints fostered a misleading implication that taxes were not cut.



Some Americans have much higher income and wealth than others. Former President Barack Obama explained, “I do think at a certain point you've made enough money.” An adviser to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez who has a Twitter account called “Every Billionaire Is A Policy Failure” tweeted, “My goal for this year is to get a moderator to ask ‘Is it morally appropriate for anyone to be a billionaire?’” Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, in calling for a wealth tax, complained, “The rich and powerful are taking so much for themselves and leaving so little for everyone else.”



Latino news networks in the United States exist for one sole reason: to inform Hispanics who prefer watching relevant content in Spanish. As such, it would seem only natural for major economic news directly affecting that viewership to occupy headlines on the nation’s top Spanish-language media outlets. Yet, as MRC Latino has repeatedly noted, the subject is consistently either ignored or under-reported, with the latest example being the new record low of 4.3% for Hispanic unemployment in February 2019.



PALM BEACH, FL — While most attention has been focused on immigrants trying to enter the United States over America's southern border, there is legal migration taking place that has been largely ignored, though it may have at least as much economic and political impact as the other. People are moving out of high-tax states to Florida and other states with lower tax burdens.



New York Times political reporter Katie Rogers specializes in fan notes to prominent Democrats, tied the government shutdown to a vintage revolutionary left-wing motif in “A Team of Millionaires Haunted by the Ghost Of Marie Antoinette.” The “Marie Antoinette” vibe could also be detected in Jim Tankersley’s report on Democrat Elizabeth Warren’s confiscatory tax plan: “Warren to Unveil Plan To Raise Taxes on Rich.” The text box is merely a quote from Warren: “It’s time to fundamentally transform our tax code so that we tax the wealth of the ultrarich, not just their income.”



WASHINGTON -- Homelessness is up for the second year in a row. That is no surprise to me. I spent the last few days in New York City, where it seems the homeless are as numerous as the tourists. They are everywhere. Not that they are not numerous in our nation's capital, too. I returned to Washington by the train, and there are areas of Union Station that are as populated with homeless people as the nearby shelter. The scenes are appalling. What can be done for these poor wretches?



We are about to find out whether Democrats meant it when they lamented the loss of civility in Washington. Having won the majority in the House of Representatives in Tuesday's election, will they cooperate with Republicans and "reach across the aisle," or will they pander to their base, which wants President Trump's blood? Guess which scenario I'm betting on Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), who will likely head the Financial Services Committee, has promised to seek revenge on the banks, which she notes loaned money to people in the '90s so they could buy houses they couldn't afford. 



In describing the GOP tax cuts, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said that they and bonuses American workers were getting were "crumbs." They were "tax cuts for the rich." Some argued that the tax cuts would reduce revenues. Pelosi predicted, "This thing will explode the deficit." How about some tax facts?



Poverty is no mystery, and it's easily avoidable. The poverty line that the Census Bureau used in 2016 for a single person was an income of $12,486 that year. For a two-person household, it was $16,072, and for a four-person household, it was $24,755. To beat those poverty thresholds is fairly simple. Here's the road map: Complete high school; get a job, any kind of a job; get married before having children; and be a law-abiding citizen.



A rag-tag bunch of 10 protesters calling for the abolition of ICE received feature-coverage treatment on Telemundo, the same network which did not consider the 164,000 Hispanics entering the labor force in June and record-low Hispanic unemployment sufficiently newsworthy to even be mentioned.



Paid Off is a brand-new TV game show that claims to be “working to end the student debt crisis.” The show’s host even told a liberal magazine Paid Off stands on the shoulders of the Occupy Movement, revealing the game show’s tilt to the left on the issue of student loans.



The Canadian government, lining the pockets of its dairy producers, imposes high tariffs on American dairy imports. That forces Canadians to pay higher prices for dairy products. For example, Canadians pay $5.24 for a 10.5-ounce block of cheddar. In Washington, D.C., that same amount of cheddar sells for $3.64. Canadians pay $3.99 for a 1-pound container of yogurt. In Washington, D.C., you can get nearly twice as much yogurt for a little over $4. It's clear that the Canadian government's tariffs screw its citizens by forcing them to pay higher prices for dairy products.