How can Judd Apatow, once ranked the smartest guy in Hollywood be so . . . ? On today's With All Due Respect, big comedy macher [credits include Lena Dunham's GirlsApatow said it was "ridiculous that anyone thinks that rich people care about other people.  When the Koch brothers give a billion dollars, it is not out of a great concern for the masses."

To his credit, Mark Halperin twice pressed Apatow as to whether his notion that the rich don't care about others also applies to rich Hollywood liberals.  Apatow eventually asserted that there's a difference: "Hollywood liberals would be willing to change the entire system if all would get the money out of it, and I don't think conservatives would do it."  Hmm.  Who was the guy who, realizing he could get untold millions from Hollywood among other places, broke his pledge to limit himself to public financing?  That would be Barack Obama.  



The New York Times is still bitter over the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United decision, which allowed businesses to give unlimited sums of money to campaigns on behalf of favorite candidates. While hailing poll findings showing alienated Americans against "the regime of untrameled momey," the NYT buried the fact that the American people care very little about the issue, compared to jobs and the economy.



Appearing on the Thursday edition of MSNBC’s The Last Word, The Nation's Katrina vanden Heuvel suggested that money in politics is discriminatory toward African-Americans: “Fifty years ago, African-Americans were discriminated against by poll taxes, literacy tests. Today, the skyrocketing costs of campaigns, including the super PACs you mentioned, these billionaires, have made everyday Americans rightful vote mean not a enough, mean too little.”



As CBS This Morning gave retiring Bob Schieffer a glowing send-off on Friday, the longtime Face the Nation moderator ripped the current media landscape: “Well, it's been turned upside down....we now don't know where people get their news, but what we do know is they're bombarded with information 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Most of the information is wrong and some of it wrong on purpose.”



On Wednesday, a federal grand jury indicted liberal activist and Florida postal worker Douglas Hughes on a total of six felony and misdemeanor charges in relation to his April 15 landing of gyropcopter on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol that, if convicted, could result in up to a nine-and-half-year prison sentence. When it came to the major broadcast networks covering this story on their Wednesday night newscasts, CBS and NBC neglected to devote even a second to this story.



According to columnist Eric Alterman, prominent journalists tend to realize that most Republicans are “ideological extremists” whose agenda, dictated by “the super-wealthy,” warps our politics. The problem, he added, is that the news stories those journalists write don’t reflect that realization.

Instead, argued Alterman in a piece for the magazine’s May 18 issue, “even our best reporters feel the need to put forth a fairy-tale narrative in which the United States enjoys a fully functioning democracy…When you consider that far-right billionaires like Sheldon Adelson and Charles and David Koch have the power to demand that presidential aspirants pledge fealty to their ideological preferences and financial interests, the notion that our laws represent the collective will of the American people appears comical at best.”



Liberals who habitually decry all the money in politics may want to turn their attention to Dallas today. That’s where a secretive meeting of millionaires and billionaires is convening and planning how to deploy $100 million over the next decade to influence American politics.

Closed to the press and public, the exclusive, invitation-only event includes the famous and not-so-famous, just so long as an attendee has at least $25,000 a year to give to causes “philanthropic” and political.



The Associated Press is one of many national establishment press outlets which has from all appearances utterly ignored National Review's chronicling of police-state tactics used by law enforcement in a "John Doe" investigation targeting Republican Governor Scott Walker in Wisconsin. Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm's fishing expedition, which began in 2012, has attempted but thus far failed to find evidence of illegal "coordination" between conservative political advocacy groups and Walker during his recall election campaign.

A search on Chisholm's last name at the AP's main national site at 9 PM ET this evening returned nothing relevant; ditto at its "Big Story" site. But the wire service's Scott Bauer found the time on Friday to relay opponents' petty, hypocritical complaint that the state is spending too much money protecting Walker, his family and his lieutenant governor from potentially violent fever-swamp leftists who Democrats could arguably be accused of encouraging (bolds are mine throughout this post; numbered tags are mine):



Four Aprils ago, polling showed Donald Trump in or near the lead in the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. In a Wednesday column, Heather Digby Parton suggested that Scott Walker could wind up as the Trump of this election cycle: the guy who peaked when he wasn’t even an official candidate.

Parton admitted that she’s never understood why so many Republicans think Walker’s great or why so many Democrats believe he’d be a tough opponent, given that he supposedly “makes epic gaffes over and over again.” In any event, she argued that now he’s hurt himself badly by going hard-right on immigration, thereby displeasing libertarian conservatives like Charles and David Koch who “tend toward a more moderate stance” on the issue and, of course, donate megatons of money to political causes.



Before disgruntled mailman Doug Hughes violated Washington D.C. airspace by landing his one-man gyrocopter on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, he sat down for a lengthy interview with the Tampa Bay Times and described in detail his plan to perform the dangerous stunt.



Eric Lichtblau and Alexandra Stevenson made the front of the New York Times by taking pains to make a major donor to Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz, sound suspicious, even sinister, digging up unflattering (and irrelevant) details and finding two liberal Democratic congressmen to criticize him.



On Monday night, ABC, CBS, and NBC combined to ignore the Hillary Clinton e-mail scandal with zero coverage of it in their evening newscasts. ABC and NBC also failied to mention the growing controversy surrounding the millions of dollars in donations to the Clinton Foundation from foreign governments and individuals. The CBS Evening News, however, stood out with a report that scrutinized the millions in donations from foreign individuals and spotlighted one member of Chinese parliament who gave $2 million to the organization in 2013.