Lauren Enk


Latest from Lauren Enk

Abby Bergman has an ax to grind. An LGBT activist “all her life,” according to her bio, the high school junior is also the daughter of a lesbian couple, and as a result … thinks we should chuck Father’s Day out the window. 

Bergman just wrote a Father’s Day piece (read, an anti-Father’s Day piece) for the Huffington Post called “Celebrating Father’s Day With Two Moms,” in which she whined that the traditional holiday was not quite inclusive enough. Although nothing stopped her from honoring “all the typical ‘father things’ that my moms do for me every day,” Bergman still managed to gripe. 



You should wait at least as long before buying a gun as before killing a baby – if HuffPo contributors Jan Diehm and Katy Hall had their way, that is. It’s an outrage to them that there are more waiting periods for abortions than there are for guns. 

Diehm and Hall posted a piece today complaining that more states require you to wait before having an abortion than before buying a gun. Using an infographic map, the article touted that 26 states have a waiting period for abortion, as opposed to 11 that require wait periods for firearms purchases. Fifteen states apparently have neither.



Uncle Jesse isn’t quite so family-friendly as he used to be. John Stamos, who played “Uncle Jesse” in the family-oriented hit TV show “Full House,” is set to host a new show in which he prompts friends and celebrities to open up about their first sexual experience. 

Entitled “Losing Your Virginity,” the new show is launching as a Yahoo! webseries in which Stamos interviews mostly-celebrity guests to reveal the details about their “first time.” Stamos is interested in whether his guest’s experiences were “a loss of innocence,” or humorous, or … (wait for it) … “love.” Although he insists it will not be graphic, he also suggested the show will re-create the guest’s loss-of-virginity experiences “with puppets or dolls or something – animated possibly.”



Having a strict “girls’ room” and “boys’ room” is just as bad as keeping black and white bathrooms separate, claimed UCLA law professor Adam Winkler. In a New Republic article called “Bathrooms Are Not Separate-But-Equal,” Winkler sympathized with Maine high school student Nicole Maines, a 15-year-old “transgender girl” who was denied access to the girls’ restroom, since Maines is biologically a boy who wears female clothing and makeup.

Winkler decried the “intolerance” of the “insensitive” schools officials who aren’t comfortable letting the male Maines use the girls’ bathroom, and complained that these are “strict and outdated rules that discriminate in who can use which restroom.” He insisted that such standards are “acts of discrimination no different from those that prohibited black people from entering white bathrooms until the 1960s.”



When you’re faced with bullying, then clearly you should be obscene and crass. That’s what HuffPo suggested in their coverage of an anti-bullying campaign called “The New F Word,” a photo campaign using pictures of celebrities flipping the bird in response to bullying.

HuffPo’s “Gay Voices” hailed the obscene photo campaign as “groundbreaking,” and gave a sample slideshow and links to support the project or buy tickets to its fundraising concert. The photo campaign includes such famous faces as Tim Gunn, Adam Lambert, Frenchie Davis, Carmen Electra, LeAnn Rimes, Lance Bass, and Aubrey O'Day--all posing for the camera with the infamous obscene gesture.



Russell Brand is living up to his raunchy reputation of cracking sex jokes about conservatives.  The crass British comedian today announced that he thinks conservative republicans with traditional views on sexuality are “perverts.”

Interviewing with HuffPo Live’s Josh Zepps, Brand said that he doesn’t know anyone who isn’t interested in sexuality. When host Zepps replied that he knew “a few Republican Conservatives who’d say that,” Brand immediately added: “I’ll bet they’re perverts.”



Yet another famous Hollywood face is pushing for gun control. “I cannot understand the people who are against some form of gun control,” insisted legendary actor Kirk Douglas on the Huffington Post yesterday.

“America’s cowboy days are over,” wrote the 96-year-old Douglas. Mentioning that “some crazy fan” had given him an engraved gun, Douglas, who often played cowboys, announced unhappily that America has “become a cowboy country with too many guns.”



“Just do it” before you say I do, HuffPo Live suggested when interviewing Jessica Ciencin Henriquez last week. Bashing programs that promote abstinence until marriage, author Henriquez attempted to blame her bad marriage on the fact that she stayed a virgin until the wedding.

HuffPo Live host Marc Lamont Hill was all support for Henriquez’ blame-game: “As the saying goes, you wouldn’t buy a car without giving it a test drive, would you?” Under the headline: “No Sex Before Marriage A Bad Idea, Says Author,” HuffPo devoted a half-hour segment to counting down reasons to give up purity before marriage.



Get with the times and be gay, Salon.com urged Disney on Saturday. The liberal site ran Renee Davidson’s piece “Why are there no gay Disney characters?” which ominously warned  that if Disney doesn’t start pushing LGBT imagery, then Mickey Mouse and his pals run the risk of going out of date.

"The animation giant has never featured an openly gay character in any of its multimillion dollar films or cartoons,” Davidson lamented, “let alone present a (genuine) same-sex kiss.” CitingArchie Comic’s recent money-making decision to portray it’s first “gay kiss,” Davidson was eager to see the House of Mouse follow suit and start writing “openly gay characters.” Otherwise, Davidson suggested, Disney might become what Archie Comic’s CEO Jon Goldwater calls “an anachronism.”



Leftie site grumpy about lack of LGBT characters.

 



Twisting Bible stories for the gay agenda? Yup, that’s right up HuffPo’s alley. 

The Huffington Post’s “Gay Voices” blog was all praise yesterday for gay artist Paul Richmond’s schlocky painting called “Noah’s Gay Wedding Cruise,” which depicts gay couples aboard the Ark. HuffPo lauded Richmond’s work as a “whimsical, gay twist on the biblical narrative.”



Al Jazeera continues to find friends among the American news media. Former NBC anchor Tom Brokaw plugged the anti-western, Qatar-owned news network during a May 30 appearance.

Brokaw commented during a HuffPo Live interview by host Alicia Menendez about his many years as a journalist. When Menendez mentioned that Al Jazeera, which recently purchased Gore’s Current TV, “is going on one of the biggest hiring binges in the U.S., media-hiring binges,” Brokaw interrupted her to announce: “I watch Al Jazeera.”



Former NBC anchor claims anti-American network does ‘pretty good job.’



The talking heads at HuffPo Live must think the Pope is pretty funny, since much of their short discussion of him on Wednesday at the tail end of a religious segment – was laughs and grins.

Perhaps it’s no surprise after HuffPo misrepresented the Pope’s words on atheists, but when the Vatican’s Rev. Rosica issued a clarification, HuffPo Live host Mike Sacks seemed to have trouble taking it seriously. He grinned as he claimed that the Vatican’s statement “seems to walk back” on what he called Francis’ “groundbreaking homily in which he stated that people who reject the teachings of Christ can be saved after all.”



Gay? Yes. Seductive and manipulative? Absolutely.  Narcissistic sex addict? You bet.  But a de facto child molester who had an affair with a minor? Nope, they left out that little detail about Liberace.  

“Behind the Candelabra,” the new HBO film about the famous gay pianist that made waves at Cannes this month, covered all the depressing details about ‘Lee’s’ turbulent homosexual affair with a man 47 years his junior, but conveniently forgot to mention that Scott Thorson, the younger half of the duo, was still a minor at only 16 years old when the two met.



‘Behind the Candelabra’ glosses over child molestation.



It isn’t often that 0.065 percent of something becomes its defining characteristic. But that’s what happened in Paris on Sunday. After a peaceful pro-traditional-marriage march had already ended, 96 protesters – less than 0.065 percent of the 150,000 demonstrators – were arrested for refusing to disperse and skirmishing with police. But from the way the media covered the march, one would think the demonstration itself was made up of violent rioters clashing with police forces.

“French pro-traditional marriage march turns into a riot,” announced The Examiner. Reuters followed suit, starting off their article with a 30 pictures slideshow, of which at least 24 shots were related to the post-march rogue groups of rioters. (Only picture #30 provided a clear view of the streets filled to overflowing with the tens of thousands of peaceful demonstrators.) Reuters admitted that “the rally was peaceful throughout much of the day,” but the second half of the article was ominously entitled “WARNINGS OF VIOLENCE IGNORED” and discussed the possibility of the march turning aggressive.



Police haven’t pinned responsibility on anyone yet for the alleged “hate crimes” against gays in New York, but “Social Justice Activist” Murray Lipp has already decided who’s to blame for the violence: religion, patriarchal society, and too many straight people.

Come again? 

That’s right.  Writing on the Huffington Post’s “Gay Voices” page, Lipp insisted the blame for violent hate crimes be laid at the door of traditional groups or beliefs he claims “create and fuel homophobia in society.” Catching the crime’s culprits isn’t enough, Lipp protested; it’s time to raze traditional societal structures and rebuild society from the ground up. “Homophobic beliefs drive homophobic conduct,” he opined.



Pope Francis made waves on Wednesday when he said that atheists can do good; but some media headlines jumped on the chance to portray the new pontiff as bucking Church teaching. 

Preaching on Christ’s words that “Whoever is not against us is for us,” Pope Francis emphasized that Christ died to redeem all men, “even atheists,” and insisted we can’t assume non-believers cannot do good.  Such people can do good, he said, and “must,” because of “this commandment at heart: do good and avoid evil.”



Pope Francis made waves on Wednesday when he said that atheists can do good; but some media headlines jumped on the chance to portray the new pontiff as bucking Church teaching.