Kyle Drennen

Kyle Drennen's picture
Senior News Analyst


Kyle Drennen is the Media Research Center's Senior News Analyst and a Contributing Editor to NewsBusters. He is the co-author of the 2014 Media Reality Check study, TV News Blacks Out This Year’s Bad Election News for Democrats.

In 2009, he captured the infamous comment from then-Newsweek editor Evan Thomas comparing President Obama to God. Later that same year, he exposed for MSNBC deceptively editing video footage of a Tea Party rally to conceal the racial identity of an African American participant, forcing the liberal network to respond to criticism and explain its actions.

His media analysis has been cited by nationally syndicated radio hosts Rush Limbaugh and Mark Levin, as well as media outlets including Fox News, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal’s WSJ.com, The Washington Times, Washington Examiner, Politico, National Review, among others.  

Kyle joined the MRC in 2007 after graduating from Providence College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and political science. He lives in Northern Virginia and can be contacted via email at kdrennen@mrc.org.

Latest from Kyle Drennen

As NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams became embroiled in a major controversy on Thursday over his false story of being shot at in Iraq, he joined a growing list of NBC journalists whose credibility has been shredded in recent months in the wake of various scandals.


After promoting Obama advisor David Axelrod's nasty attack on Mitt Romney on Wednesday, Thursday's CBS This Morning noticed Romney aide Garrett Jackson denouncing the claim as a complete fabrication, with co-host Norah O'Donnell informing viewers: "Jackson told CBS News, 'I just hope this lie is the work of David Axelrod and not the President. It's ridiculous. I was very disappointed they would make that up.'"


While NBC anchor Brian Williams admitted on Wednesday that he falsely claimed a helicopter he was riding in was hit by enemy fire over Iraq in 2003, his Nightly News broadcast scolded Hillary Clinton for making similar false war zone claims during the 2008 presidential campaign. On March 24, 2008, Williams opened the show by proclaiming: "Also, war of words, a new eruption among the Democrats and why Hillary Clinton is changing her story about a trip to an overseas war zone."


Touting Dr. Vivek Murthy "making history" as the "first surgeon general of Indian descent" and "one of the youngest in history," CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose welcomed the nation's new top doctor to the show Wednesday morning for "his first television interview." Rose never explained that the reason for the delayed Senate confirmation was Murthy's own partisan background and controversial anti-gun views. Senate Republicans objected to Murthy's role in founding Doctors for Obama to support the President's 2008 campaign and his open advocacy for gun control, asserting in 2012 that "Guns are a health care issue."


Wednesday's NBC Today decided that the interior design of a Republican Congressman's office was an important national news story, as co-host Savannah Guthrie informed viewers: "Let's start with the latest intrigue involving my favorite show, Downton Abby....Bright red walls and carpeting, pheasant feather displays and gold-colored sconces....This is the Downton-inspired office of this guy, Illinois Congressman Aaron Shock."


While the ABC, NBC, and CBS morning shows on Tuesday all jumped on potential Republican 2016 contenders Chris Christie and Rand Paul being sympathetic toward parents skeptical of child vaccinations, all three broadcast networks ignored Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton holding the same positions in 2008.


In an interview aired on Monday's NBC Today, President Obama discovered that speaking to an actual journalist was a bit tougher than having YouTube celebrities lob softballs at him. In the exchange – conducted prior to the Super Bowl on Sunday – co-host Savannah Guthrie grilled the President over his handling of the war on terrorism: "You said in your State of the Union that American leadership is helping to stop the advance of ISIS in Syria and Iraq. But your critics say that is delusional, that in fact they've gained more territory since the air strikes have begun."


Even as his fellow Morning Joe co-hosts praised John McCain on Friday for denouncing Code Pink anti-war protesters who attempted to disrupt a Senate hearing as "low-life sum," MSNBC's Thomas Roberts lectured the Republican Senator for shutting down the intruders: "If people want to show up and protest, right? They should be allowed to hear their voices. And instead of calling Capitol Hill police and then calling them 'low-life scum.'"


On her Thursday MSNBC show, host Andrea Mitchell was aghast at Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu agreeing to speak before a joint session of Congress during an upcoming U.S. visit without consulting the Obama administration: "The White House is furious, furious at Israel's Prime Minister Netanyahu and also a little bit angry at Speaker Boehner for inviting Netanyahu to speak before Congress, to a joint meeting of Congress without even consulting the administration – protocol would dictate that."


Appearing on Thursday's NBC Today to promote his new film Black or White, actor Kevin Costner stood by his criticism of left-wing activist Michael Moore, following Moore's remarks slamming military sniper Chris Kyle as a "coward": "I just felt that those comments were, from my point of view, really wrong."
 


On MSNBC's PoliticsNation on Tuesday, host Al Sharpton touted liberal Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank making a "bold prediction" about the remainder of Barack Obama's presidency: "...you wrote, quote, 'If the economy continues on its current trajectory, as most expect, he'll leave office a popular president and leave the 2016 Democratic nominee with a relatively easy past to victory.'"


After all three network evening newscasts ignored President Obama dropping his controversial plan to tax 529 college savings accounts on Tuesday, only Wednesday's CBS This Morning noticed the development, giving it a mere seventeen seconds. Neither NBC's Today nor ABC's Good Morning America covered the White House reversal.


Appearing on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Tuesday, Huffington Post reporter Sam Stein worried that the Clinton political machine would be unable to compete with funding from Charles and David Koch during the 2016 presidential campaign: "I mean, Hillary Clinton and Bill Clinton will be scratching lotto tickets, I think, for the next week just trying to catch up with the $889 million that the Koch brothers are going to put in here."


Leading off an interview with Bobby Jindal on ABC's This Week on Sunday, host George Stephanopoulos played a clip of the Louisiana governor and potential Republican 2016 contender speaking about his faith during a religious event on Saturday: "We can't just elect a candidate and fix what ails our country. We can't just pass a law and fix what ails our country. We need a spiritual revival to fix what ails our country. It is like God has given us the book of life....And on the last page, our God wins."


Appearing on CNBC's Power Lunch at 1 p.m. ET Friday, the business network's chief Washington correspondent John Harwood touted President Obama's proposal to tax 529 college savings accounts: "If you want to change the distribution of income in this country, you've got to take from some to give to the other, and that's precisely what the President wants to do. Middle class families...have stagnated for a long time...while people at the top have done much better. So the administration is trying an across-the-board attempt to change that....redistribution Obama-style."


While playing a game of "Never Have I Ever" on Friday, the hosts of NBC's Today made a series of embarrassing confessions – everything from admitting to having "sexy dreams" about each other, to being drunk on air, to seeing each other naked.


In a nasty screed against American Sniper on Wednesday, Rolling Stone contributing editor Matt Taibbi claimed the Oscar-nominated film was "almost too dumb to criticize" but proceeded to do so anyway, declaring: "Even by the low low standards of this business, it still manages to sink to a new depth or two."


Introducing a segment on Thursday's NBC Today about parents saving for college, co-host Matt Lauer and the show's financial editor Jean Chatzky spent a scant twenty-four seconds on President Obama's recently announced proposal to hike taxes on college savings accounts. Lauer noted: "Talk to me a little bit about what President Obama was referring to when he gave the State of the Union address and he talked about proposing changes to 529 accounts."


Appearing on PBS's Charlie Rose Tuesday night following President Obama's State of the Union address, Bloomberg View columnist Al Hunt praised it as "one of the best speeches of his presidency" and "remarkably effective," before admitting: "I don't think he's going to get much done....This is not a cycle where you get much done. He may get a little stuff on trade and infrastructure."


In a softball interview with Joe Biden on Wednesday's NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer fretted over there being "more tension than normal" during Tuesday's State of the Union address with Republicans in control of Congress and slammed GOP reaction to a line in the speech: "...the President was talking about having arguments that are worthy of the body and the country, and then he said, 'I've run my last campaign,' and there was a smattering of applause, maybe even laughter from some Republicans and the President shot back. Did you see that as a moment of disrespect? Was it a symptom of the very pettiness that the President was referring to?"