Jay Maxson

Contributing Writer


Latest from Jay Maxson

The NFL and its new partner, rapper Jay-Z, are trying to put ex-player and renegade Colin Kaepernick in the past and move social justice activities off the field, and The Nation's sports editor Dave Zirin is fit to be tied about these developments. Zirin is so mad at Jay-Z for supposedly selling out Kaepernick that he wrote two blogs this week to blister the man who agreed to become a new social justice partner with the NFL.



USA Today resident progressive sports writer Christine Brennan is demanding that our 2020 Olympic athletes delay a visit to the White House until after the presidential election. President Donald Trump's tweetstorms and manipulative behavior would simply be "a terrible distraction" for U.S. Olympic competitors, she predicts. And besides, Brennan writes, the athletes should not be used as pawns in Trump's "cutthroat Washington chess matches."



Tuesday's NBC Sports Pro Football Talk discussion between Mike Florio and Chris Simms fully demonstrated how the sports media's criticism of those who repeat the "stick to sports" refrain is much more of an attack on conservatives than anything else. After it became known that the NFL Players Coalition had drop-kicked Miami Dolphins' owner and Trump supporter Stephen Ross out of its social justice club, he and conservatives were subject to attack by left-wing echo chambers.



Hey, any of you NFL owners out there interested in entrusting your team's fortunes this season to a man leading a Black Panther-inspired movement and a fight for black liberation in his spare time? Yes, it's Colin Kaepernick, who came out swinging at police, system oppression and the NFL again today, practically taking over The Paper, a publication featuring commie radical Angela Davis, Kaepernick's kneeling sidekick Eric Reid and Victoria Secret's first trans model.



Though the NFL recently tilted further to the cultural Left by aligning with rapper Jay-Z for the direction of future Super Bowl entertainment, ESPN's race-baiting Bomani Jones is ripping the new partners for selling out Colin Kaepernick. Jones took to the sports section of the ESPN blog, The Undefeated, to bash billionaire NFL owners, Jay-Z and "white supremacist" President Donald Trump while defending Kaepernick's social justice crusade.



Reading more like a political action committee's website, The Washington Post sports section devoted a story this week to a progressive sports announcer's upcoming book aiming to discourage the 2020 re-election of Senate President Mitch McConnell (Rep-Kentucky). Ben Strauss wrote the story about a book-length rebuke of McConnell by Matt Jones, a "southern progressive populist," sports radio host in Kentucky and ongoing critic of the long-time senator. The book is co-authored by Chris Tomlin, not to be mistaken for the popular Christian singer Chris Tomlin.



Athlete activism is both growing and diversifying, just in time for the 2020 Summer Olympics and the U.S. election, writes The Washington Post's Jerry Brewer. It's all the more reason for this sports columnist to stray from his lane and stick to the promotion of athlete/coach activism. "Could there be many displays that paint the ugly picture of divisiveness in America?" Brewer asks.



Brent Suter is a relief pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewers who isn't looking to Mariano Rivera or Lee Smith, two relievers who were recently inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame, for his inspiration. His role model is Al Gore, and he's trying to save the planet. Suter's worldly mission got a big boost Tuesday from The Washington Post's Dave Shelnin, whose story details Suter's efforts to save the world.



Former World Series champion and six-time baseball all-star Curt Schilling's talk of running for Congress is drawing "combustible" reactions from hostile media, along with strong support from his pal, President Donald Trump. The former major league pitcher especially incited the rancor of The Washington Post and USA Today.



A new survey of Native American opinions on the Washington Redskins' nickname once again demonstrates underwhelming opposition to the moniker and just how out of touch the so-called "mainstream media" really is. The new survey duplicates the Washington Post's 2016 poll finding that 90 percent of Natives are not offended by the Redskins' nickname ― much to the disappointment of writers at the Post. Like Theresa Vargas, who insists the name is a dictionary-defined slur, no matter how many people accept the word.



American fencer Race Imboden deserves induction into the "Hall of Shame" for kneeling on the victory stand at the Pan American Games and dishonoring his country on social media Friday. The Democratic Underground certainly loves his tweet blaming a "hateful" President for his pathetic protest, and Bleacher Report gave him a platform for encouraging other athletes to disrespect the U.S. flag.



Washington Post sports writer John Feinstein, author of the 1986 inside look at former Indiana University basketball coach Bobby Knight (A Season On the Brink), can't wait to hear from right-wingers about his latest column condemning the notion of sticking to sports. In a tweet promoting the column, Feinstein dismisses the idea of sports writers and athletes sticking to sport as "ludicrous.":



We can officially classify the USA Today's Jarrett Bell as a multi-tasking sports writer and social justice warrior. He's earned his spurs ― if that isn't too militaristic a word for sensitive progressives ― especially after today's puff piece lathering praise upon the Miami Dolphins' receiver/anthem kneeler Kenny Stills. Bell writes that "Activist and Trump critic Kenny Stills is the kind of player every NFL team needs".



Fearing they'll lose their reputation as the Worldwide Leader in Entertainment and Sports "Political" Network, ESPN personalities are defying President Jimmy Pitaro's stick-to-sports directive. Some of the network's biggest names trampled over his restrictions on politicizing their work, using social media to strongly advocate for government action to stop shooting massacres.



Scoring five goals in one game can give a pro soccer player an inflated sense of self importance on matters of public policy. Philadelphia Union winger Alejandro Bedoya got so full of himself on his huge day Sunday in D.C., that he dictated a gun control demand to Congress. USA Today's For The Win sports blog denied it was a call for gun control and labeled it "patriotism at its best."



For the second year in a row and following the horrific shootings in Dayton and El Paso, social justice warriors have politicized the Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony. Champ Bailey and Ed Reed exploited their Hall of Fame platform to position gun violence and racism as America’s biggest issues. A year ago, Hall of Fame inductee Randy Moss wore a tie politicizing the deaths of several African-American men. Carron J. Phillips, a social justice writer for The Shadow League, championed all three former NFL stars as "true patriots."



Members of the sports media were thrilled when the Baltimore Orioles on Thursday night took four President Trump fans not "out to the ball game," but out of "the old ball game." Doing their best to make Baltimore baseball horrible again by taking an 11-2 shellacking from Toronto, the cellar-dwelling Orioles removed the fans for displaying a large Make America Great Again banner advocating for the re-election of President Donald Trump in 2020.



How low can some media members go? Try knee level. In his post, "Missed Opportunity: Taking a Knee at the Debates", Splinter blogger Hamilton Nolan says Wednesday night's Democrat presidential hopefuls blew a golden opportunity by not kneeling for the national anthem. Evidently the media now look to NFL reject Colin Kaepernick as a role model for presidential wannabes on the Left.



Media fascination with America-hater Colin Kaepernick continues as strong as ever as the NFL readies for its third season without his acidic presence. TMZ Sports is thrilled that Kaepernick gave a shout-out to former teammate Eric Reid, who plans to carry on the despicable spectacles Kaepernick inspired during the 2016 season, his last in the NFL. Former NBA player Grant Hill told CNN's Van Jones that athletes like Kaepernick have the right to be outspoken, and diehard media are still holding out hope that some team would be foolish enough to sign him.



Chicken Little, the sky is NOT falling! Media, members of Congress, corporate America and soccer's social justice warriors have all supported an ongoing narrative that the U.S. national women's soccer team has been the victim of sexism, receiving lower pay than men's team members. An Associated Press story carried by USA Today Sports revealed the U.S. Soccer Federation has actually paid out more to the women.