Clay Waters

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Clay Waters was director of Times Watch, a former project of the Media Research Center. His self-published whodunnit? is titled Death In The Eye.

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The New York Times was in a panic in Saturday’s edition, with reporters Manny Fernandez and David Montgomery relaying Democratic whining about a GOP fundraising letter in “Texas Democrats Urge G.O.P. to ‘Eradicate’ Incendiary Rhetoric.” The Texas-based team of Fernandez and Montgomery have previously teamed up for freak-outs over the “far right,” “ultraconservative” Texas GOP, and they are still skittish about their fellow Texans: "Leaders of the Texas Democratic Party called the letter racist, anti-Latino and anti-immigrant and said it was filled with the kind of rhetoric that fueled the hatred of the El Paso gunman."



Tom Wright-Piersanti, a senior staff editor on the political desk of the New York Times embarrassed his paper, which has been busy lately attacking President Trump for anti-Semitism, when several of his past offensive anti-Jewish tweets resurfaced at Breitbart, including one from New Year’s Day in which he resolves to be “less anti-Semitic” that year! It's revealing to see how the paper has dealt with previous examples of offensive (or “offensive”) social media comments, both from people in the news or on the Times’s staff. The paper’s outrage regarding “offensive” tweets seems connected to how many friends you have in liberal bastions like the mainstream press and Hollywood.



David Koch, the foremost of the businessmen, philanthropists, and libertarian activists known colloquially as the “Koch Brothers,” has died at 79. The New York Times marked his passing Friday by posting an obituary by Robert McFadden: “David Koch, Industrialist Who Fueled Right-Wing Movement, Dies at 79." The paper has long had a virulent hostility to the Kochs libertarian activism, and McFadden’s obituary for Koch is marred by bad faith and bad labeling. He has a history of hostile obits for conservatives, while showing reverence for liberal figures.



In a story for the New York Times front page Tuesday, “Shareholders Rule No More, C.E.O.s Pledge,” business reporters David Gelles and David Yaffe-Bellany conceded all the left-wing arguments about the evils of big business and roasted Nobel laureate free-market economist Milton Friedman as an avatar of greed: "This mind-set informed the corporate raiders of the 1980s and contributed to an unswerving focus on quarterly earnings reports. It found its way into pop culture, when in the 1987 movie “Wall Street,” Gordon Gekko declared, 'Greed is good.'"



The New York Times may be trying to haul moribund Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro over the line and onto the stage for the next debate.The front page of Monday’s edition featured a profile of Castro by Amy Chozick, “He Had an ‘Obama Moment.’ His Supporters Want Another.” Chozick seems bent on providing that moment with her rags-to-riches gloss on Castro. Castro is the twin brother of Rep. Joaquin Castro, who personally shamed some of his constituents who had the audacity to participate in the political system by donating to the Trump re-election campaign. Chozick skipped that family drama, instead leading off with ancient history: Castro’s keynote address at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.



Forget 1776 and all that: The New York Times wants to "reframe" your benighted understanding of the nation's founding, which they date to 1619, when the original sin of slavery first began to spread, as the first Africans were brought to North America as slaves. This year marks the 400th anniversary of that event, and the Times is primed to put slavery in the center of the American story, and redefine capitalism as slavery while they’re at it. The first salvo came in the special edition of the Sunday Magazine, stuffed with left-wing opinions, from the economy to junk food to medical care to the political system and traffic jams in Atlanta, with verything tied back to slavery.



They blew it again: After the New York Times’s pathetic response to the violent left-wing protestors of Antifa assaulted conservative journalist, the paper has apparently learned nothing. it accomplished more lousy reporting about Antifa on the latest clash in Portland, Oregon, for Sunday’s paper. The clear labeling bias served the radical, violent left-wing protest group: “Tensions Rise as Far-Right and Anti-Fascist Groups Face Off in Portland.” The conservative protesters were given various appellations of “right” and “far right,” while the violent left-wingers, their identities hidden under masks, were given their preferred flattering description, “anti-fascist.”



Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar and Rep. Rashida Tlaib were barred from visiting Israel, and the New York Times was not pleased. An editorial on Friday had an anti-Israel slant and a whitewash of the anti-Semitic nonprofit co-sponsoring the trip, along with a helpful link to their website. Two lead stories Saturday painted Israel's move as a win for the left-wing anti-Israel movement in both countries: "Israelis concerned about the health of the relationship with the United States worried aloud on Friday that by barring members of Congress at all, let alone because of their political views, the Netanyahu government had gravely jeopardized Israel’s bipartisan support in Washington."



The New York Times’s Cara Buckley (“a culture reporter who covers bias and equity in Hollywood”), complained Hollywood wasn’t embedding enough climate change messaging in their blockbuster movies in Saturday’s “Hollywood Sells Doom, Not Hope On Climate -- Critics say villains and dystopias obscure crisis-alleviating actions.” One suspects that the complaint that in some films “environmentalist are criminals” is the true concern: Perhaps Buckley and company are just annoyed that left-wing environmentalists sometimes feature as movie villains, as opposed to the usual villain of corporate raider or military madman?



Reporter Michael Wines hyperventilated again over “dangerous to democracy” gerrymandering by Republicans in Wisconsin, in Thursday’s New York Times: “Push to End Partisan Maps Is Held Up by the Map Makers.” He led off with strong language: When the Supreme Court concluded this summer that it had no authority to strike down partisan political maps, no matter how outrageous, Chief Justice John G. Roberts offered solace to those who call the maps dangerous to democracy."



In her obituary for retired congressman Paul Findley, Republican from Illinois, New York Times’s Katharine Seelye ignored Findley’s anti-Semitic conspiracies, while bashing Republicans for being overly conservative and in the pocket of the Israel lobby: "Who else had a strong reason to want President Kennedy out? It is interesting-but not surprising-to note that in all the words written and uttered about the Kennedy assassination, Israel's intelligence agency, the Mossad, has never been mentioned.And yet a Mossad motive is obvious."



New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has twice in one week put his brand of classless leftist vulgarity on display after a national tragedy, this time by using the El Paso massacre to accuse Republicans of being terrorists and white supremacists. “Useful Idiots And Trumpist Billionaires" used a Trump fundraiser by the owner of Equinox and SoulCycle to claim Trump is trying to raise a "white nationalist regime." Last week Krugman said "the G.O.P. has become a systematic enabler of terrorism."



The liberal media will shamelessly blame its more conservative competitors for tragedies, and the front-page of Monday’s New York Times climbed on board with a long investigative report : “How the El Paso Gunman Echoed The Words of Right-Wing Pundits.” The Times story included graphic blocks of transcript excerpts from conservative personalities like Tucker Carlson, Ann Coulter, and Rush Limbaugh, plus Fox News guests, taking every opportunity to link the figures to white supremacist massacres.



Reporter Jo Becker got huge front-page play on the front of Sunday’s New York Times for the investigation, “How Nationalism Found a Home in Sweden -- A Global Machine Fuels the Far Right’s Rise.” But while battling two of the paper’s favorite villains, Russia and “Islamophobia,” along with the Swedish political party Sweden Democrats, Becker left out the context of quite a lot of recent Swedish history. It turns out that the concern over assimilating Muslim immigrants in Sweden is neither a recently hatched Vladimir Putin plot or the figment of racist imagination.



New York Times London-based reporter Ceylan Yeginsu reported on the abortion debate in Belfast under a flawlessly biased headline: “Can Northern Ireland Cling To Its Draconian Abortion Laws?” The online headline was bad in a different way: "Climate of Fear: When Part of a Country Bans Abortion.” (“Bans abortion” is an odd way to describe a law that has been in place in Northern Ireland since 1861.)



The New York Times article posed as a "fun" interactive quiz but hid some nasty Republican sliming in the text, accusing the GOP of conspiring to hold on to office via “voter suppression or attempts to skew the census” : “Quiz: Let Us Predict Whether You’re a Democrat or a Republican.” It’s a creation of Sahil Chinoy, similar to his previous “graphics” story, in which one of his graphics showed a major swerve to the left by the Democrats since 2008 but was downplayed in favor of the story’s intended takeaway of Republicans careening toward the “far right.”



The New York Times has learned its lesson on front-page headlines, making sure it injected plenty of anti-Trump context to lead its Thursday edition, after being vilified by the left for insufficient hostility toward Trump (and quickly changing a banner headline) on Tuesday. The headline over Thursday’s lead story posed no such danger to liberal groupthink, as it dutifully countered everything Trump did with a liberal rebuttal: “President Uses A Day Of Healing To Stoke Discord – Trip To Ohio And Texas – Trump’s Anger at Critics Eclipses His Gestures Toward Victims.”



The Columbia Journalism Review interviewed New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet over the Times changing its Tuesday morning lead headline after a left-wing social media mob complained it wasn’t sufficiently hostile to President Trump, in the wake of the mass murders in El Paso and Dayton. The paper’s own “Reader Center” also issued a mea culpa in “A Times Headline About Trump Stoked Anger. A Top Editor Explains."



Boston Globe staffer Teresa Hanafin’s daily e-mail newsletter downplayed the "news" angle to spew virulent anger toward both Trump and the Republican Party. Some of the fiery excerpts, delivered with a patina of ultra-cynicism, from Monday's offering: "Republicans don’t value people; they worship the blood money the NRA pours into their campaign coffers. If the slaughter of 20 first-graders couldn’t change that, nothing will. Get used to it....Let's be honest: As long as Republicans hold any power, the slaughter will continue."



The New York Times went to press for Tuesday’s print edition with the banner headline “Trump Urges Unity Vs. Racism.” But that accurate summation of what President Trump said about the mass murders in El Paso and Dayton did not please the left on Twitter, which demanded “context” about Trump actually being a racist demagogue. And the Times, which relies on the left for its readership, swiftly obeyed, showing repentance by admitting “The headline was bad” and changing it for the second morning edition  to a more Trump-skeptical headline “Assailing Hate, But Not Guns.”